Selman Chevrolet - Top

JR Motor Sports - Top

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  1. #1
    Engine building character obnoxious001's Avatar
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    565 cubic inch BBC build

    Ok,, thought I would post photos of this build I did earlier this year for "Rightytighty" over on PB. After discussing his needs, we decided on a 565 cubic inch normally aspirated big block Chevy, looking for something around 700 HP or so to put into a 21' Sanger mini cruiser.

    Parts would include:

    New Dart 10.2" tall deck block with billet main caps
    Extra nice used Lunati 4.250" crank
    New Compstar 6.800" connecting rods
    New JE flat top pistons
    New Dart Pro 1 heads with Inconel exhaust valves










  2. #2
    Engine building character obnoxious001's Avatar
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    First thing I do is some cosmetic work on the block, even though the Dart blocks are really nice from the factory, here is some before and after. Besides looking nicer, it gets rid of sharp edges. The work in the valley helps a bit with oil drainback to the crankcase.












  3. #3
    Engine building character obnoxious001's Avatar
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    After a very thorough wash job I can get ready to paint the block. Actually , it's much more like 3 wash jobs, using degreaser, brushes, then high pressure water rinse, then high pressure soap type wash with more brushes, then high pressure water rinse again. The Dart blocks come with steel freeze plugs for some reason, those get changed to brass. They also supply coated cam bearings with the billet cap block.



    After installing the brass plugs with sealer (aviation Permatex), I mask the block for paint, using tape and paper on the top, but I have a dedicated timing cover and oil pan just for painting, as well as covers for water pump and fuel pump bosses that are all held in place with bolts to save time.



    And then the finished paint job:


  4. #4
    Engine building character obnoxious001's Avatar
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    Meanwhile, the rotating assembly has been picked up from the balance shop. I use Revco in Long Beach, I have known Larry since about 1979 when I worked for Gale Banks and he was balancing for ABS in Southgate.


  5. #5
    Engine building character obnoxious001's Avatar
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    First I measure the crankshaft and record my measurements.




  6. #6
    Engine building character obnoxious001's Avatar
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    Apparently I don't have a photo of using the dial bore gauge to compare the bearing clearance against the micrometer reading. By setting the dial bore gauge at "0" against whatever the micrometer setting is for a given jounal, then torquing the bearings into place and measuring with the dial bore gauge, the gauge reads the bearing clearance so there is no guessing. I usually go back and forth and double check the dial bore gauge against the mic several times to try and make sure I don't make a mistake. In this case I was able to hold a good tolerance using all standard size bearings with the exception of one .001" under main bearing shell. I don't mind that the rear main bearing has a little extra clearance with the wide surface area.


  7. #7
    Engine building character obnoxious001's Avatar
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    The crank gets laid in place after a very careful wash in the solvent tank, and the crank endplay checked with a dial indicator.


  8. #8
    Engine building character obnoxious001's Avatar
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    Now the pistons and rods get washed. All of the bearings had been previously torqued into the heads and measured. I keep all the wrist pins with the pistons they were balanced with, even though they should all weigh the same. The newspaper on the bench was all clean and fresh prior to laying out the parts in the order that I will install them, even bank in the rear, odd bank in the front. By using the same methods each time I assemble an engine, it makes it easier to get everything done without mixing up parts or making mistakes.




  9. #9
    Engine building character obnoxious001's Avatar
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    Pistons are put onto the rods, making sure to oil the wristpins prior to assembly. This step takes some time, no matter how many times I have assembled pistons with spiral locks, they are a bit of a pain sometimes.


  10. #10
    Engine building character obnoxious001's Avatar
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    The rings get set into the individual cylinders, measured with a feeler gauge, and then filed to get the gap the maker recommends for the particular application. The rings get squared in the bore with a special tool.

    This was one of the last engines I had to hand file prior to buying a new electric ring filer, photos of that in a future build.




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