WELCOME TO RIVER DAVES PLACE

1979 Schiada RC, The Boss

lenmann

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Thanks for the positive feedback guys, much appreciated. By the way if you see me doing something wrong, don't hesitate to pipe up, constructive criticism welcomed on this deal. As mentioned above, this is my first time down this trail.

Next up, the prop shaft hole. The hole's location is set by the bushings in the barrel of the strut and a really long hole saw. Assuming I got the strut in the right spot the prop shaft hole should also intersect the imaginary plane through the V of the hull and pop out of the floor on the centerline I taped out.

Not having anybody nearby to borrow a really long hole saw from I made one using my old 1" prop shaft, a carbide tipped 1 3/8" hole saw a piece of 1 3/8" thin wall tubing.

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I made up a plywood guide to help avoid any "walking" from the hole saw as the hole started holding it up against the hull with a floor jack. Everything lined up well with the marks I laid out using the laser pointer, so I clamped on the electric drill, took a deep breath and pulled the trigger. The drilling took less effort than I expected and went pretty quickly.

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I don't have my new 1-1/8" prop shaft yet because I needed to drill the hole first and mock up the v-drive location to figure out the length so I can order it from Bergeron. I ran down to the local steel yard and bought a nice chunk of 1-1/8" cold rolled steel (have you seen the price of steel recently?) and after installing the bushings in the strut, shoved the bar up through the floor and the shaft alignment came out pretty close to perfect but you can see the shaft hole walked about an 1/8" to the right. I'm not really sure why. It may have been a little misalignment of the plywood "V", maybe some slop in the strut bushings, or in the interface between the hole saw and shaft. I am pretty sure it will be OK, there isn't anything close to interference with the shaft and the shaft log flange is large enough to assure everything seals up well.

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The slug from the hole saw is pretty cool, feels funny cutting out some of glass I put in there not so long ago.

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Next up: Rudder stuffing box, blast plate, and the motor rails and million other things...
 

Toolman

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Thanks for the positive feedback guys, much appreciated. By the way if you see me doing something wrong, don't hesitate to pipe up, constructive criticism welcomed on this deal. As mentioned above, this is my first time down this trail.

Next up, the prop shaft hole. The hole's location is set by the bushings in the barrel of the strut and a really long hole saw. Assuming I got the strut in the right spot the prop shaft hole should also intersect the imaginary plane through the V of the hull and pop out of the floor on the centerline I taped out.

Not having anybody nearby to borrow a really long hole saw from I made one using my old 1" prop shaft, a carbide tipped 1 3/8" hole saw a piece of 1 3/8" thin wall tubing.

View attachment 996121 View attachment 996122 View attachment 996123

I made up a plywood guide to help avoid any "walking" from the hole saw as the hole started holding it up against the hull with a floor jack. Everything lined up well with the marks I laid out using the laser pointer, so I clamped on the electric drill, took a deep breath and pulled the trigger. The drilling took less effort than I expected and went pretty quickly.

View attachment 996130 View attachment 996129 View attachment 996131

I don't have my new 1-1/8" prop shaft yet because I needed to drill the hole first and mock up the v-drive location to figure out the length so I can order it from Bergeron. I ran down to the local steel yard and bought a nice chunk of 1-1/8" cold rolled steel (have you seen the price of steel recently?) and after installing the bushings in the strut, shoved the bar up through the floor and the shaft alignment came out pretty close to perfect but you can see the shaft hole walked about an 1/8" to the right. I'm not really sure why. It may have been a little misalignment of the plywood "V", maybe some slop in the strut bushings, or in the interface between the hole saw and shaft. I am pretty sure it will be OK, there isn't anything close to interference with the shaft and the shaft log flange is large enough to assure everything seals up well.

View attachment 996132

The slug from the hole saw is pretty cool, feels funny cutting out some of glass I put in there not so long ago.

View attachment 996173

Next up: Rudder stuffing box, blast plate, and the motor rails and million other things...
Looks like you nailed it dead on. Good work.
 

025

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Thanks for the positive feedback guys, much appreciated. By the way if you see me doing something wrong, don't hesitate to pipe up, constructive criticism welcomed on this deal. As mentioned above, this is my first time down this trail.

Next up, the prop shaft hole. The hole's location is set by the bushings in the barrel of the strut and a really long hole saw. Assuming I got the strut in the right spot the prop shaft hole should also intersect the imaginary plane through the V of the hull and pop out of the floor on the centerline I taped out.

Not having anybody nearby to borrow a really long hole saw from I made one using my old 1" prop shaft, a carbide tipped 1 3/8" hole saw a piece of 1 3/8" thin wall tubing.

View attachment 996121 View attachment 996122 View attachment 996123

I made up a plywood guide to help avoid any "walking" from the hole saw as the hole started holding it up against the hull with a floor jack. Everything lined up well with the marks I laid out using the laser pointer, so I clamped on the electric drill, took a deep breath and pulled the trigger. The drilling took less effort than I expected and went pretty quickly.

View attachment 996130 View attachment 996129 View attachment 996131

I don't have my new 1-1/8" prop shaft yet because I needed to drill the hole first and mock up the v-drive location to figure out the length so I can order it from Bergeron. I ran down to the local steel yard and bought a nice chunk of 1-1/8" cold rolled steel (have you seen the price of steel recently?) and after installing the bushings in the strut, shoved the bar up through the floor and the shaft alignment came out pretty close to perfect but you can see the shaft hole walked about an 1/8" to the right. I'm not really sure why. It may have been a little misalignment of the plywood "V", maybe some slop in the strut bushings, or in the interface between the hole saw and shaft. I am pretty sure it will be OK, there isn't anything close to interference with the shaft and the shaft log flange is large enough to assure everything seals up well.

View attachment 996132

The slug from the hole saw is pretty cool, feels funny cutting out some of glass I put in there not so long ago.

View attachment 996173

Next up: Rudder stuffing box, blast plate, and the motor rails and million other things...
Nice work len, I used to call those a tube saw. Hang on to it, they come in handy.
 

lenmann

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Made some progress since the last update. Spending a lot of time drawing up parts and waiting on machine shops.

CAD.jpg
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I took a page from the @Backlash best selling book "Saving Wood Transoms for Fun and Profit" and wound up some fiberglass tubes for the drain plug and through hulls. I bonded the tube and some glass plugs that were then blind drilled and tapped to assure a leak proof finished assembly. This should do a better job of water proofing than gobbing a bunch of silicone on the fittings and screws. If you have ever lived the absolute HORROR of replacing a rotted, waterlogged transom this relatively small amount of extra effort is cheap insurance. I will do the same for the raw water pickup through hulls once I figure out their exact locations.

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Also drilled, trimmed and set the rudder stuffing box, set the blast plate, and got the motor rails drilled and set. As you can see, I went with two pieces of 3/8" aluminum angle as Schiada isn't selling any Z extrusion these days. I think the Z rails are a more elegant solution but the aluminum angle approach will be plenty functional and strong. Note the sooper cool engine plate mounting blocks from @Toolman

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Next up, cav plates, motor plates, clamshell braces, and a start at roughing out helm, seat and pedal positions.
 

warpt71

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Im curious, did you drill the stringers, motor rails, and backing plates all at once in the boat or separate on drill press/mill? If done in the hull, how did you keep everything strait and clean?

I have a project that is going to need rails and maybe backing plates but my stringers are already drilled, not that I couldn't plug and drill new holes, but, it will be a new experience for me.

Killer progress 👍👍
 

OkHallett270

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Made some progress since the last update. Spending a lot of time drawing up parts and waiting on machine shops.

View attachment 1000019 View attachment 1000020

I took a page from the @Backlash best selling book "Saving Wood Transoms for Fun and Profit" and wound up some fiberglass tubes for the drain plug and through hulls. I bonded the tube and some glass plugs that were then blind drilled and tapped to assure a leak proof finished assembly. This should do a better job of water proofing than gobbing a bunch of silicone on the fittings and screws. If you have ever lived the absolute HORROR of replacing a rotted, waterlogged transom this relatively small amount of extra effort is cheap insurance. I will do the same for the raw water pickup through hulls once I figure out their exact locations.

View attachment 1000008

View attachment 1000009 View attachment 1000010
View attachment 1000011

Also drilled, trimmed and set the rudder stuffing box, set the blast plate, and got the motor rails drilled and set. As you can see, I went with two pieces of 3/8" aluminum angle as Schiada isn't selling any Z extrusion these days. I think the Z rails are a more elegant solution but the aluminum angle approach will be plenty functional and strong. Note the sooper cool engine plate mounting blocks from @Toolman

View attachment 1000013 View attachment 1000015 View attachment 1000016 View attachment 1000014


Next up, cav plates, motor plates, clamshell braces, and a start at roughing out helm, seat and pedal positions.
@lenmann
So I have a question on the drain hole and glass plugs for the screws. How did you bond those plugs to the gelcoat? Do you have to feather the gel back a little to get them to “bite” and seal up good or do you just epoxy or resin them in place and grind/sand them down flush?
 
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lenmann

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Im curious, did you drill the stringers, motor rails, and backing plates all at once in the boat or separate on drill press/mill? If done in the hull, how did you keep everything strait and clean?

I have a project that is going to need rails and maybe backing plates but my stringers are already drilled, not that I couldn't plug and drill new holes, but, it will be a new experience for me.

Killer progress 👍👍
Thanks.

I drilled the inside rails first on the mill, locating the holes to avoid the motor plates and blocks. Because my stringers aren't perfectly flat, straight, or plumb I had to "float" them into the correct orientation using small blobs of quick set epoxy, shims, and clamps. Once the epoxy set up I drilled through the holes in the inside rails through the stringers. Then I repeated the same "float" in epoxy blobs process on the outside rails. Once the epoxy set I drilled again from the inside through the stringer through the outside rails. Now both inside and outside rails are oriented correctly, the holes are all match drilled and I can bolt them together. I used mold release wax on the backside of the rails so they will release from the epoxy when I tear it all back apart for anodize. Also, when I reassemble it for the final time I will fully bed the rails in a more complete layer of epoxy to assure full contact with the stringers.

I hope that makes sense.
 

lenmann

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@lenmann
So I have a question on the drain hole and glass plugs for the screws. How did you bond those plugs to the gelcoat? Do you have to feather the gel back a little to get them to “bite” and seal up good or do you just epoxy or resin them in place and grind/sand them down flush?
They are 1/2" diameter x 1" long G-10 epoxy/glass cylinders bonded in a slightly oversize hole with thickened resin. When I cut them off on the lathe I added some grooves to improve retention and bite. I pre-fill the hole and paint some resin on the plug and when inserted the surplus resin and air squeezes out and fills the gap between the plug and the hull. The plugs finish up little proud of the adjacent transom surface so I carefully grind them flush, drill and tap. The flange on the Teague drain assembly just covers the plugs so it worked out pretty nicely.

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warpt71

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Once the epoxy set up I drilled through the holes in the inside rails through the stringers.

I hope that makes sense.
Yup, I follow. Was any jig used to keep the drill square going through the stringer? I have through drilled a stringer once and it didn't end up level
 

Backlash

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Lenman I am BEYOND flattered that you chose to duplicate my drain plug sleeve dealio! 👍👍 I think that is probably the best way to do it when installing a wood transom. I hope so anyways, or there will be two boat owners who are pissed at the outcome! 😁 As always my friend, everything looks INCREDIBLE!!!! Keep up the amazing work and thank you for sharing an update with some pictures!!!
 

lenmann

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Yup, I follow. Was any jig used to keep the drill square going through the stringer? I have through drilled a stringer once and it didn't end up level
Yes, I just made up a simple MDF jig using a 3/8" drill bushing I had laying around. Inserted the shank of a 3/8 drill bit through the bushing into the existing hole, clamp the jig, remove the bit and drill away.

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Backlash

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"I just happened to have one laying around...."

😁👍
 

lenmann

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"I just happened to have one laying around...."

😁👍
Seriously though, I have this box of drill bushings of all sorts of sizes and shapes. Something I probably scavenged from a job 40 years ago, stuff that got pulled out of tools before they were scrapped. EVERY time I go to that box hoping to find the size bushing I need for some random project that needs a straight hole, there isn't one.

I am going to take as some kind of good omen, that there was one 3/8" bushing in there when I needed it for the Schiada.
 

ChrisV

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Final coat of Duratec VE primer on and the guide coat applied. More sanding...this time with 180 grit.

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Happy with the way the strakes sharpened up.

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Shot 3 + gallons of Dura-Kote Tapeline White gelcoat. The first 3 coats mixed 70:30 with DuraTec Clear High Gloss additive to build opacity and the last two coats at 50:50 to get to a 30 mil thickness. The additive helps the gelcoat spray better, flow out with less orange peel and best of all eliminates the need for an air inhibitor like wax in the gel coat or PVA sprayed on afterward. I used this combination on the finished bilge of the DCB Mach 22 I recently sold and was pretty happy with the results. It laid out smooth enough that I didn't need to sand or polish it. This time I really had trouble getting the gel to lay down and flow out. I used the same gravity feed HVLP gun with a massive 4.5mm air cap but at the 70:30 mix it went down a little dryish and didn't flow well, the 50:50 batches sprayed and flowed better but because the base layers were lumpy I ended up with more orange peel than I wanted that will require some extra sanding. Oh boy! Turns out this gel coating deal has a bit of a learning curve.

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May I ask what final sanding paper you used for the primer before gel? Also what gun did you use? Thank you.
 

lenmann

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May I ask what final sanding paper you used for the primer before gel? Also what gun did you use? Thank you.
The last coat of primer was sanded with 180 grit.

I used this gun:

It's just OK performance wise. The gelcoat/Duratec didn't lay down as flat as I had hoped resulting in more than planned sanding. I have heard of guys using Harbor Freight primer guns with a 2.0mm tip, drilling it out to about 2.8mm and getting good results.

Hope this helps.
 

rivergames

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Incredible Work Buddy!

I have used these spiral drum sanders to get a bit more clearance on shaft log holes.
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