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2007 Evinrude Etec 150 Motor Test - No Lower Unit

DrFlash

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Hi guys! I need some advise here. I have a 2007 Evinrude 150 hp outboard motor. The previous owner hit something and damaged the lower unit so I purchased the boat/motor without the lower unit. There doesn't seem to be any damage to the mid-section where the lower unit bolts onto the mid-unit. There is no upper drive shaft and the engine hasn't been started in over a year. I'm wanting to at least do a compression test and then I'll inspect all I can on the power section and mid-shaft before forking out $ for a new lower unit, water pump, propeller, upper drive shaft, etc. I may still rebuilt the upper two sections if needed, but I'll consider finding a rebuilt motor instead should the power section have issues.

Just to verify, are there any reasons why I couldn't do a compression test without the lower unit? You don't need a tranny in order to do a compression test with a car engine, but I'm new to boat motors and I've heard that they're much more complex. I've purchased the official motor repair manual so I should be good to go as far as taking things apart, cleaning, replacing seals, gaskets, etc. I expect to have to purchase a few specialty tool (oh darn), but I have a lot of tools already.

After the motor is checked and good to go, I'll be doing a complete restore of the deck boat. I'll be repainting, reupholstering, upgrading the sound system, etc. I look forward to a new project and plan on making a video of the entire project. I'm sure I'll be bugging y'all over the next few months, but I'll share as I go. My last project was an Acura TL restoration for my son. We did it together and it was a lot of fun...and frustration. My kids and I are now going to tackle the boat restoration. I'll see how long they stay excited and motivated.

Thanks in advance for your help!!
 
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HydroSkreamin

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You're good to go checking compression, nothing to hurt. I wouldn't run it without a water pump, but if you engineered a hose to the water tube, ensuring the tube would stay intact while running (I'm not familiar with the Evinrude arrangement), you could idle it with hose water flowing.

Make sure you have the tether/kill switch pulled when you do a compression test, as well as opening the throttle all the way for an accurate compression assessment. I usually crank for 10 compression hits, with plugs out of the rest of the cylinders. If you open the throttle and do 10 hits on each, you'll have an accurate test. I also like to look to see what the first two numbers are. Normally I'd like to see 100 PSI by the second hit on a stock engine. Even numbers between cylinders means more than the actual number, as compression gauges vary, and numbers vary with starter speed.

That being said, make sure your battery is up for the task if it's been sitting for a year. You really want it cranking the same speed for #6 as it did for #1 to ensure an accurate test.

Good luck!
 

DrFlash

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You're good to go checking compression, nothing to hurt. I wouldn't run it without a water pump, but if you engineered a hose to the water tube, ensuring the tube would stay intact while running (I'm not familiar with the Evinrude arrangement), you could idle it with hose water flowing.

Make sure you have the tether/kill switch pulled when you do a compression test, as well as opening the throttle all the way for an accurate compression assessment. I usually crank for 10 compression hits, with plugs out of the rest of the cylinders. If you open the throttle and do 10 hits on each, you'll have an accurate test. I also like to look to see what the first two numbers are. Normally I'd like to see 100 PSI by the second hit on a stock engine. Even numbers between cylinders means more than the actual number, as compression gauges vary, and numbers vary with starter speed.

That being said, make sure your battery is up for the task if it's been sitting for a year. You really want it cranking the same speed for #6 as it did for #1 to ensure an accurate test.

Good luck!
Thanks! The battery is shot. I'm buying a new one with a minimum of 800 CCA. I'm going to spray Seafoam Deep Creep in each cylinder just to make sure that there isn't any rust build up prior to the test. I don't want to create a new problem when none may exist.
 

Crazyhippy

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Keep a charger on the battery while you are doing the tests... a minor cranking speed difference can show as a much larger compression difference. I also retest #1 last as a way to verify.

I usually only do 3-4 compressions/cyl, but am watching the gauge while someone else turns the key. 2nd time around is usually max number anyways.

A bit of oil (wd40 even) in the cyl will make for a more consistent number.

No issue even firing up (briefly, no waterpump...) without the lower. Be warned, it will be a bit loud!
 

DrFlash

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So I spent the day mapping out the wiring and making sure everything was connected correctly. I learned that the Bilge pump has a damaged electrical wire so that needs fixed. I inspected the spark plugs and they look good.

I purchased a remote starter switch and began the compression test. When I connected one lead to the solenoid battery terminal and the second lead to a bolt on the solenoid (if I understood correctly, that's where I was supposed to connect the second remote ignition switch lead), nothing happened. So, I must have not connected the lead to the correct spot on the solenoid.

I know that if I connect one lead to the battery terminal and the second to the starter terminal of the solenoid, it's too much juice for the remote starter I own to handle. Well, I did it anyway for just a few seconds. The motor turned over very slowly for 4 -5 rotations and then stopped. I'm assuming it's because the remote starter switch was incapable of handling that kind of juice (it got very hot, very quickly as expected). Just in case, I did starter solenoid test. There was no continuity whatsoever. I'd say yup, a bad solenoid, but I'm second guessing myself. My multi-meter is acting up a bit so I'm not 100% trusting it. I'm going to buy a new one and retest.

So, I guess that I'll wait for the key I ordered to arrive and try again in a couple of days by using the ignition switch with key to do the compression test and to turn over the motor. If it's still sluggish or just not getting enough voltage to activate the starter, I'll then consider ordering a new Solenoid. I'll check the wiring with a new multimeter to make sure there's no issues there first, but so begins the journey.

If anyone has any input or wisdom to bestow, I'm all ears! I have to put in a new CV axle in my wife's car so I likely won't do much on the boat tomorrow.
 
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HydroSkreamin

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Have you tried just turning your engine over by hand with a ratchet or breaker bar?

It sure sounds like you have a bad connection or a lot of internal engine friction.

You should be able to do the old screwdriver jump from starter hot stud to solenoid activation pole. It doesn’t matter if your remote switch is getting power at the battery post or the starter post; it’s the same power other than cable losses at the starter.

The current to pull the solenoid in shouldn’t be that much. You’ll see the wire that is connected to it isn’t that large of gauge.

Also, is there any corrosion protection on the terminals you are trying to use for jumping power? This could lead to bad and sporadic connection as well.

Id give it the ratchet/breaker bar test with all of spark plugs out before you go any further
 

DrFlash

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Have you tried just turning your engine over by hand with a ratchet or breaker bar?

It sure sounds like you have a bad connection or a lot of internal engine friction.

You should be able to do the old screwdriver jump from starter hot stud to solenoid activation pole. It doesn’t matter if your remote switch is getting power at the battery post or the starter post; it’s the same power other than cable losses at the starter.

The current to pull the solenoid in shouldn’t be that much. You’ll see the wire that is connected to it isn’t that large of gauge.

Also, is there any corrosion protection on the terminals you are trying to use for jumping power? This could lead to bad and sporadic connection as well.

Id give it the ratchet/breaker bar test with all of spark plugs out before you go any further
I will use the rest of the bottle of Seafoam deep creep and test again. I can turn over (very slowly) using the my hand so I don't think that there's excess friction. Excessive fxn from something like powerhead hydro-lock or seized powerhead or gearcase would prevent me from using my hands to rotate.

I've never done the ratchet/breaker bar test so I'm not sure how to do it. I'm sure there's a video somewhere that I can look at.

After that test you mentioned, I guess I'll check the connections to ensure that they're clean, check the starter circuit for a V drop, and if necessary, check the starter itself including the bendix/driver gears. After that, I'm not sure what to do. My suspicion is that it's either the solenoid, the starter, or faulty wiring. But, I could be wrong.

I thought that maybe it was a fuse, but that doesn't quite seem right with the symptoms I'm seeing.
 

Crazyhippy

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What size wire were you hooked up to on the stater solenoid? It sounds like you were running full starter current thru the remote starter switch.

Maybe a pic?
 

DrFlash

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What size wire were you hooked up to on the stater solenoid? It sounds like you were running full starter current thru the remote starter switch.

Maybe a pic?
I was running full current, I believe, through the switch. I couldn't get it to work any other way, but I could have not connected to the correct spot with the non-battery terminal side of the solenoid. I'll send a photo here shortly.
 

DrFlash

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I was running full current, I believe, through the switch. I couldn't get it to work any other way, but I could have not connected to the correct spot with the non-battery terminal side of the solenoid. I'll send a photo here shortly.
The first image is what I did first where nothing happened. The second image is how I got to motor to turn slowly, but very quickly heated up the entire manual starter switch. I was running full current through the RSS.
 

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HydroSkreamin

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Holy balls, dude! You were running ALL of the starter current through your remote switch.
Now you have a good understanding why manufacturers want certain size wiring 😂

I’d check that switch and wires before you use it again.

The intent of the jumper isn’t to carry the entire load, just to activated the solenoid (whose job is to transfer the entire load).

If you weren’t able to activate the solenoid, I’d check connections first, then the solenoid itself. What you’re commanding with the jumper to activate the solenoid is exactly the same request the keyswitch will make.
 

DrFlash

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Holy balls, dude! You were running ALL of the starter current through your remote switch.
Now you have a good understanding why manufacturers want certain size wiring 😂

I’d check that switch and wires before you use it again.

The intent of the jumper isn’t to carry the entire load, just to activated the solenoid (whose job is to transfer the entire load).

If you weren’t able to activate the solenoid, I’d check connections first, then the solenoid itself. What you’re commanding with the jumper to activate the solenoid is exactly the same request the keyswitch will make.
yup, I knew that I did and I knew that I shouldn't, but I did (as I mentioned in my original post) when I couldn't figure it out any other way knowing that I'd likely destroy that remote starter switch. It's also why I was pretty sure that the switch was incapable of doing the job due to such a small gauge wire. I'm pretty sure the Solenoid is a possible issue. I'm just waiting to go to the store to by a new multi-meter to verify. My original test showed no continuity.
 

Crazyhippy

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You will need one of the terminals inside that weatherpac connector... not sure which one without a diagram.

May be easier to bridge @ the back of the switch?
 

DrFlash

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You will need one of the terminals inside that weatherpac connector... not sure which one without a diagram.

May be easier to bridge @ the back of the switch?
I'm not sure what the weatherpac connector is. I've read up on it online, but I'm not sure where it'd be on my motor. I have the manual if that helps. Just let me know what section you need to look at and I'll attach it. I can't upload the entire manual as it's too large of a file.
 

Crazyhippy

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The weatherpac connector shown in your pictures. The solenoid needs 4 wires to work. Big in from battery, Big out to Starter, trigger wire from key (can be very small) and a ground (can also be small). That plug will have 1 wire that goes to the key, and 1 that should be ground.
 

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DrFlash

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The weatherpac connector shown in your pictures. The solenoid needs 4 wires to work. Big in from battery, Big out to Starter, trigger wire from key (can be very small) and a ground (can also be small). That plug will have 1 wire that goes to the key, and 1 that should be ground.
Thanks. Here's the diagram that I believe you need.
 

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Crazyhippy

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Looks like the purple wire on the left side of that plug goes up to the key switch. That is the one you want to power to turn the motor over.
 

DrFlash

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Looks like the purple wire on the left side of that plug goes up to the key switch. That is the one you want to power to turn the motor over.
Thanks Crazyhippy! That makes sense now. I'll need to expose the wire to test, but I can use some of my auto heat shrink tubing afterwards.
 

DrFlash

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Thanks Crazyhippy! That makes sense now. I'll need to expose the wire to test, but I can use some of my auto heat shrink tubing afterwards.
Here are the results:
Boat Battery: 12.68 A
battery + cable terminal +ground: 12.68 A
Battery + and Key Switch Connector wire (Purple from weatherpac connector plug): 12.68 V (when engaged)
Starter + and Battery +: 0.4 mA

End Result: there is nothing but a click at the solenoid, but the starter does not engage.

Battery is fully charged, battery cables and connections are sound, wiring harness shows 12+Volts, Solenoid reading is under 1.0 mA, key switch connector wire when engaged is 12+ A

I can test the fuse/wiring to the fuse and test the starter/wiring to the starter, but it will slowly engage when I bypass the solenoid and fuse with the remote starter switch. I'm thinking that it could be the starter unless I'm misinterpreting the findings.
 

DrFlash

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Here are the results:
Boat Battery: 12.68 A
battery + cable terminal +ground: 12.68 A
Battery + and Key Switch Connector wire (Purple from weatherpac connector plug): 12.68 V (when engaged)
Starter + and Battery +: 0.4 mA

End Result: there is nothing but a click at the solenoid, but the starter does not engage.

Battery is fully charged, battery cables and connections are sound, wiring harness shows 12+Volts, Solenoid reading is under 1.0 mA, key switch connector wire when engaged is 12+ A

I can test the fuse/wiring to the fuse and test the starter/wiring to the starter, but it will slowly engage when I bypass the solenoid and fuse with the remote starter switch. I'm thinking that it could be the starter unless I'm misinterpreting the findings.
And the fuse is undamaged.
 

HydroSkreamin

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Sounds like you’ve determined the solenoid works. The two things I would check are voltage at the solenoid stud going to the starter while someone hits the key to ensure that the voltage is indeed getting through the solenoid, and I’d check the starter ground.
 

DrFlash

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Sounds like you’ve determined the solenoid works. The two things I would check are voltage at the solenoid stud going to the starter while someone hits the key to ensure that the voltage is indeed getting through the solenoid, and I’d check the starter ground.
Yeah, I believe that I tested yesterday from the solenoid stud to the starter and it was good. I'll do it again because I'm not 100% certain. Wiring to the 10 A fuse is also good as is the fuse. So I'll need to test the starter ground. I'll check that out tomorrow afternoon after work or during lunch. The last thing I guess is to remove the starter and test it.
 

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On another note, How to I Tell what oil to use without taking it to the dealer and having them test. I think that I might still do it just to verify the total hours on the motor. It's not the original. There isn't a tag anywhere saying that it does 30:1 or 100:1. I want it at 100:1 so if it's not at that ratio, I'll have to have the dealer program it.
 

DrFlash

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Sounds like you’ve determined the solenoid works. The two things I would check are voltage at the solenoid stud going to the starter while someone hits the key to ensure that the voltage is indeed getting through the solenoid, and I’d check the starter ground.
When putting my positive lead on the solenoid starter stud and the negative lead on a ground, I do not get any voltage when triggering the remote starter switch. then the positive is on the starter stud and the negative lead is on the key switch connector wire, I do get adequate voltage when using the remote starter switch.
 
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DrFlash

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On another note, How to I Tell what oil to use without taking it to the dealer and having them test. I think that I might still do it just to verify the total hours on the motor. It's not the original. There isn't a tag anywhere saying that it does 30:1 or 100:1. I want it at 100:1 so if it's not at that ratio, I'll have to have the dealer program it.
Nevermind, I found the tag. It's 50:1 so I'll have to have it reprogrammed.
 

DrFlash

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Sounds like you’ve determined the solenoid works. The two things I would check are voltage at the solenoid stud going to the starter while someone hits the key to ensure that the voltage is indeed getting through the solenoid, and I’d check the starter ground.
All of the B+ cables are completely corrosion free including from the starter stud to the starter positive terminal. I removed the starter and tested the starter motor by itself without the solenoid. The bendix starter drive does rise up for a split second, but it does not stay up. The gear rotates without issue. Normally, when doing the test with the solenoid and starter motor, that bendix starter drive that does not rise and stay risen often means a bad solenoid. In this case, I believe that the starter is bad, but I'm not 100% certain. I'd appreciate you're guy's help here who are more experienced than I. Thanks in advance.
 

DrFlash

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All of the B+ cables are completely corrosion free including from the starter stud to the starter positive terminal. I removed the starter and tested the starter motor by itself without the solenoid. The bendix starter drive does rise up for a split second, but it does not stay up. The gear rotates without issue. Normally, when doing the test with the solenoid and starter motor, that bendix starter drive that does not rise and stay risen often means a bad solenoid. In this case, I believe that the starter is bad, but I'm not 100% certain. I'd appreciate you're guy's help here who are more experienced than I. Thanks in advance.
I believe that that's normal. I'm looking at a diagram and there's a spring. It would make sense that the spring would return the bendix gear back down once the rpms of both the starter and bendix are at the same number of rpms.
 

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Update, it was a ground. I got it to start after checking compression. 122-122-120-118-118-120. I' go ahead and order the gear case. Thanks for your help!
 
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