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Anchor line length?

SS-C

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Hi all,
I'm ordering new anchor line and shore spike line.
Problem is, don't have mine in front of me to get a measurement on how long they are. The lengths I've been using have worked out great, just never paid any attention to them.
What lengths have you guys narrowed it down too?
 

ltbaney1

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i run atleast 6' of chain on any anchor, and like to have 100-200' of line attached. I keep 75' for the shore spike.
 

MK1MOD0

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I guess it really depends on what type of boat and, where ya boat. I have a small boat that never leaves the river.

10 ft on sand spike, and 50ft on anchor. Never needed more.
 

Instigator

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6 to 12 feet of good chain and rode needs to be 8 times the depth in which you anchor.

Determining how long your anchor rode should be is as simple as multiplying the deepest water you expect to anchor in by 8. As for rope size, the rule of thumb is 1/8" of rope diameter for every 9' of boat length. So if you expect to anchor your 26' boat in 30' of water, you need 240' of 3/8" nylon rope.
 

rrrr

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Some of the above posts give anchor rode lengths for anchoring on open water, and they're spot on. The length of the rode, or scope, should be five to eight times the water depth. It varies based on weather conditions likely to exist on the body of water.

Since the OP mentioned a sand spike, it can be assumed he is anchoring to the shore with it. In that case, the rode can be much shorter. I'd say a maximum of 75' just for convenience, but I would buy a 100' rode because that's a common length, and it can double as an open water rode in depths up to 20' depending on the weather.

I've found a five scope adequate for moderate conditions. An eight scope with a properly sized and efficient anchor will hold in just about any weather short of a violent storm.

Regarding open water anchors, I've always used the aluminum alloy Fortress. It has much better holding power than a standard Danforth style anchor.
 
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PlanB

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I have two large Box Anchors both with 100' of rope. I have anchored everything from a 38' Top Gun to a toon at Havasu with little problems. I assume we are talking Havasu, and if that's the case it's a fairly shallow lake / river.
 

Icky

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Meh, I have 2 slide anchors with at best 30' on them and danik hooks

The box anchor stays in the bag 95% of the time
 
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77charger

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3-4 ft of line per 1 foot of depth is usually good enough.I have used danforth anchors in lake sand dirt bottoms without chain for years with no issues.So 15 ft of water you want minimum 45 ft

Also have a box anchor and use the same 3-1 ratio but it really only works better in rocky bottoms and no they aint magic where you need 1-2 ft of line per ft of water LOL
 

Spot

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For Havasu, I run two box anchors with 100 feet each. For the shore spikes, I use whatever the situation calls for. I have 10ft to 25ft lines available.
 
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SS-C

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Thanks guys,
I think I'll just get two 1/2" X 100' rolls and tailor to my needs.
Is the polypropylene rope any good for just the casual lake anchoring?
 

DWC

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Thanks guys,
I think I'll just get two 1/2" X 100' rolls and tailor to my needs.
Is the polypropylene rope any good for just the casual lake anchoring?
It’ll work fine for the lake. 100’ is more than enough for the majority of Havasu use. The only time I’ve wanted more or a second anchor is for the DS shootout and Billy B’s races in Needles.
 

Hypnautic

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Large box anchor with 150’ line.
Medium box anchor with 100’ line
Spike with 25’ of line.

No chain on the box anchors and Danik hooks on all.
 

rrrr

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Thanks guys,
I think I'll just get two 1/2" X 100' rolls and tailor to my needs.
Is the polypropylene rope any good for just the casual lake anchoring?
No. Polypropylene doesn't stretch, and when wave action hits your boat, the shock will jolt the anchor free. Polypropylene is susceptible to chafing damage, which breaks the individual strands and eventually renders the line useless. It also deteriorates quickly from UV rays. Polypropylene is good for ski and inflatable ropes, but not anchor rodes.

Use nylon line that's specifically packaged as anchor rode. It has a built in lay, or twist, that makes it easier to roll as it is brought in. You can purchase the packaged anchor rode with an eyelet and thimble on one end, which makes it easy to attach to your anchor, or a 6' length of chain and the anchor if you use the chain to avoid lake bottom chafing.

You don't need 1/2", a 3/8'' anchor rode is adequate for boats up to 26' in length. The tensile strength of 3/8" nylon is around 4,800 lbs. Nylon has good reaction to loads and wave action, a 100' length will stretch ten feet or more. It also resists mildew and rot. I always use a propane torch to fuse the end strands of the rode so they don't unravel.

Never use nylon for watersports, because if it breaks, the stretch and snapback can cause the line to entangle and injure or drown the person being towed. Do not, under any circumstances, use a metal clevis or any similar device to attach a tow rope to a boat or towable. They can become deadly missiles if the line breaks or comes undone.
 
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PlanB

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I have 5/8 nylon rope on my anchors, but I also bought that when I was anchoring a boat that was north of 10,000 pounds. I would definitely go with nylon...
 

LowRiver2

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88730980-D96D-470B-BDC0-E7FED35A88A6.jpeg

I run this off my box anchors: less scuffing, clanking when handling on the boat.
 

Spot

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I stopped running chains on my anchors. I would rather buy a new anchor than deal with gel coat damage on my boat while moving the anchor around and storing it. I am sure chains have there place but it’s overkill for what I am doing.
 

SS-C

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I stopped running chains on my anchors. I would rather buy a new anchor than deal with gel coat damage on my boat while moving the anchor around and storing it. I am sure chains have there place but it’s overkill for what I am doing.
Totally agree, took my chain off many years ago for that very same reason.
I basically anchor in calm coves and such, so don't need anything extreme.
 
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