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Boat survey questions

Snprhed

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Im looking at buying a 96 Nordic Heat. It has some gelcoat damage on the bottom. It looks repairable to me, but Im far from any kind of expert.

The rest of the boat is in really good condition. Low hours, blue motor, and really good interior and exterior (other than damage) and he has it priced to sell. He is going to turn it into insurance to get repaired.

Ive never had a survey done on a boat but with the damage it has, plus he has only owned it for this summer, I feel like I need a professional to inspect it. Should I just have a local mechanic check it out? Should I get a marine survey? Should I have them inspect it before and after fiberglass repair?
 

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REVENGE 97

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Im looking at buying a 96 Nordic Heat. It has some gelcoat damage on the bottom. It looks repairable to me, but Im far from any kind of expert.

The rest of the boat is in really good condition. Low hours, blue motor, and really good interior and exterior (other than damage) and he has it priced to sell. He is going to turn it into insurance to get repaired.

Ive never had a survey done on a boat but with the damage it has, plus he has only owned it for this summer, I feel like I need a professional to inspect it. Should I just have a local mechanic check it out? Should I get a marine survey? Should I have them inspect it before and after fiberglass repair?
From the pic it looks like a area that had some impact, the white area is fractured fiberglass, a area that had impact that damages the structure of the laminate, could be from many reasons like trailer damage, hit or sat on a rock, fell on the ground at one time ???? I would check the complete bottom for other areas that may have been repaired, usually a repair on the bottom doesn't get quite the finished detail that the side or deck would and the repairs on the bottom usually discolor quicker than the factory gel coat will, yes if your spending a good chunk of change on a boat I would always suggest getting it surveyed, will cost you a fair amount but it may save you in the long run and could help you getting it insured.....Good Luck with your purchase
 
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stephenkatsea

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I'm really not sure what qualifications, if any, it takes to become a boat surveyor. Maybe just knowing a sign painter and someone who prints business cards is sufficient? Lol. If you're in LHC, I'd recommend Saleen Fiberglass Restorations. I've found them to be straight up kind of guys. Typically they don't need the work. But, they'll give you honest answers about your boat.
 

Snprhed

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The guy whos father was a marine surveyor also is certified by the Association of Certified Marine Surveyors
the other guy in the same town is parts of the Society of Accredited Marine Surveyors.

I have not looked either up yet
 

stephenkatsea

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The guy whos father was a marine surveyor also is certified by the Association of Certified Marine Surveyors
the other guy in the same town is parts of the Society of Accredited Marine Surveyors.

I have not looked either up yet
OK, so what does it take to be a "Certified" or "Accredited" marine surveyor? Seems to be a rather circular situation. ?? Don't take it wrong. I also had a friend who's father was a well known Marine Surveyor. Never understood the process. We once found considerable dry rot in the Rudder Compartment of a large ocean going yacht, which had just gone through, and passed, his father's Marine Survey. We went to his father with our findings, with which he notified the buyer. So, at least the buyer didn't get screwed. That really made me wonder about the certification and potential liability, if any, of a Marine Surveyor.
 
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stephenkatsea

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From what I've experienced, Marine Surveyors typically work for large insurance companies, boat brokers and boat loan companies. When their expertise is required to cover machinery, electronics, hull, fiberglass etc etc - numerous areas worthy of very considerable knowledge and experience, I begin to have concern with one individual having sufficient knowledge of each and every category. If it's for a bank or insurance company, they can do whatever they want. They can afford mistakes and/or omissions. If it's for myself, I'd go to a good known Marine Mechanic for mechanical items, someone well established and experienced in fiberglass for fiberglass/laminates/gel coat items, etc etc. But, that's just me. It may end up costing a few more dollars. But, at least then you're dealing with someone who truly knows a lot about what they're looking at.
 

C08H18

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i've used a surveyor on 2 yacht purchases and 1 yacht sale. The surveyor provided a market value in the latter case. In the case of fiberglass damage, they will likely point out the problem and direct you to a specialist for intrusive testing to determine the depth of damage. in you case, it looks like more than than gel as @REVENGE 97 suggests. @stephenkatsea suggested Saleen - good choice! PIng the hull with a hammer and look for add'l soft spots the owner may not be aware of. Since you haven't bought it and the owner seems willing to fix it, you can probably reach an agreement to have Saleen fix it and then complete the sale. They will find any add'l issues.

When i bought my HEAT, i ran it over to Nordic for a quick look-see and had them inspect the outdrive, compression/leakdown check the motor, and download the engine data. i don't believe a surveyor would have added any more value given the smaller pleasure craft.
 

Snprhed

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The boat is at the lake of the ozarks. Really the fibreglass/hull/stringers and transom are my biggest concern. I would also like to get a compression test as well. Maybe I should just look for a fiberglass guy up there and then just get the compression/leakdown done separately
 

C08H18

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The boat is at the lake of the ozarks. Really the fibreglass/hull/stringers and transom are my biggest concern. I would also like to get a compression test as well. Maybe I should just look for a fiberglass guy up there and then just get the compression/leakdown done separately
Yep, have a local shop do the leak down and compression check and have them put new plugs in while they have the old one out. I would have them change the drive oil to see if there is any signs of gear wear. The outdrive should be taken apart every 100 hrs and gears & shafts inspected for wear so ask about the prior inspection. Drive oil change is a worthwhile 'inspection'.

The gelcoat problem can lead to water absorption into the fiberglass. Other than weighing, i have no idea how they would measure this. I damage looks new so i wouldn't be concerned yet. Knowing how and when the damage occurred and whether it sat in or out of the water after the damage would be useful.
 

Taboma

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Yep, have a local shop do the leak down and compression check and have them put new plugs in while they have the old one out. I would have them change the drive oil to see if there is any signs of gear wear. The outdrive should be taken apart every 100 hrs and gears & shafts inspected for wear so ask about the prior inspection. Drive oil change is a worthwhile 'inspection'.

The gelcoat problem can lead to water absorption into the fiberglass. Other than weighing, i have no idea how they would measure this. I damage looks new so i wouldn't be concerned yet. Knowing how and when the damage occurred and whether it sat in or out of the water after the damage would be useful.
Not sure if the Havasu shops have the moisture meters, although I'd think they would. The ocean boat yards had meters for testing for water absorbed in the glass. They used it for hulls suffering osmotic blisters, where they'd grind them off, then allow the boat to sit until sufficiently dried before making the fiberglass repairs.
 
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