WELCOME TO RIVER DAVES PLACE

Cross it off the Bucket List - Bad Ass Trailer by Adrenaline

RiverDave

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Every now and again someone builds something that's a little different then everyone else. When that happens my ears perk up, because I'm always interested in "why" they are doing it different, and the pro's and con's of what they are doing versus what is traditional. When Bruce Curry (Screen name "Bucket List" on RDP) went to Adrenaline Trailers to build him a trailer, it was pretty clear that he wanted something custom for his needs, instead of "just another trailer."

The story of this trailer starts when Bruce went to jack up his old trailer and it had gotten so rusted through that the jack broke off of it. He put a different clamp on style jack on the other side to tide him over for awhile, but it was clear that some salt water usage had ate this trailer from the inside out.

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Bruce put a pen to paper, and decided he was going to build not only a custom trailer with all the little bells and whistles, but one that is also reliable for long hauls. In short he was going to solve every problem he has ever had towing trailers with this build.

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We will start with what caused the failure of the first trailer to begin with. Bruce is kind of a "nomad" boater that typically boats anywhere between Parker and Davis Dam. That said if the water is smooth at home, he has no problem dropping the boat in the ocean and running it as well.

A traditional "Box Tube" frame isn't a great idea for anything that is ever going to go in the salt, because they are extremely difficult to flush, and start rusting from the inside out almost immediately. The first thing he decided was he wanted a channel trailer, but he couldn't live with the idea of having some galvanized aluminum trailer that looked like it belonged to a fishing boat. Steel and painted were a must, but he also wanted larger main rails then what was currently available in channel. All the steel main rails on this trailer were actually custom made by the steel supplier!

(In this photo you can see the back of the steel channel, and the wiring going to the LED in the Fender pad. Note the rubber grommet where it passes through and cushion stainless steel adel clamps holding the loom)

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So lets start at the front of the trailer and work our way back. On top of the tongue you can see an electrical box that has a full size 7 wire connector to it. It connects to a Jet wiring harness that transfers straight to the truck with an identical receptacle. The electrical box is pretty trick, and to look at it from all angles the work is flawless.

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Right behind that is a stainless box that actually "saddles" the trailer. This box was fabricated in house by Adrenaline. The portions that "saddle" the trailer and hang down on the sides of the main rail actually house the electric over hydraulic actuator for the trailer, and all of the trailer wiring.

Inside of the box their is actually plates that bolt on top of those things so you can throw all of your tools and jack etc.. In talking with Bruce he made it clear that if he's ever changing a tire on the side of the road again, he's going to have real tools with him to make it easier.

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He just threw the jack in there as he was picking up the trailer. I believe he will add some carpet in there or finish out the inside with rhino lining or something. If you look closely on the right side you can see the cover plate that protects the actuator, and wiring loom.

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Directly behind the box, is the bow stand that is fairly standard with the exception of the ridiculously nice hand wench. One thing I thought was pretty clever is a lot of guys usually put a second smaller winch down below to hold the boat in place. Wayne used a ratchet strap that is typically used on the rear of trailers to hold the boat to the trailer. It's smaller, easier to use, and has a quick release to remove it from the boat, and then it will automatically reel in the strap when not in use.

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The next thing you will come to is the spare tire mount. This was done with the usual upgrade that Adrenaline has become known for, where they actually mount the spare tire on an actual spare hub.

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You can see the spare hub mounted here before the spare went on. With Torsion axles you can see that it's basically one nut to unscrew, and you can slide the hub off the axle and replace with a new one. Bearing problems on the road are a thing of the past with this setup. Even more to that point, this trailer is equipped with "Vault" hubs by UFP, that never need to be serviced, and are claimed to be the most reliable setup on the market right now. Zero maintenance for the life of the trailer!
Spare Tire Mounted on the Hub.

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Which takes us back to the Stainless Fenders, that have steel diamond plate inner walls. Most boat trailers they hang the fenders on the ends off the fender pads, and if it's a triple axle will add a small support in the middle underneath. When you do it with a solid metal inner wall, it protects the boat in the event of a catastrophic blow out (steel belted tires will blow right through a wood fender pad) The other upside to the steel diamond plate is it offers support throughout the entire length of the fender if you ever wanted to stand on it. (Note, if you stand on one of these polished fenders you'll likely be crucified, but the thought is you could if you had too) This trailer also sports disc brakes on all three axles for ridiculous stopping power in the event of an emergency.

(Picture taken before Bruce brought his wheels and tires to Adrenaline)

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Wheels and tires installed on the trailer. While Bruce loves the West Coast Custom scene, and the look of low pro tires, this trailer was "purpose built" to be able to be a long haul trailer with minimal problems on the road. That is why he went with real deal heavy duty tires instead of the typical low pro car tires that are used on custom trailers for West Coast Customs.

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The trailer features the long slimline LED's all in stainless caskets provided by extreme trailers. Heading towards the rear of the trailer you will see two chrome side guides that are adjustable and or easily removable via a "pinch bolt"

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Something I thought was kinda clever on this trailer was this hidden light, that shines back on the license plate frame.

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All of the brake lines are hard lined, aesthetically pleasing, and still about as hidden as you are going to get on a channel trailer. The electrical is tucked up inside the channel that you really can't see it unless you are looking for it, and all of the loom routes into the tool box so that it is hidden.

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There is a hidden float switch in the back of the trailer, so when you back it in the water it turns on the "Run Way" lights, or up lighting. Every cross member has these bright "dot" LED's on both sides so when you are putting the boat on the trailer at night it lights everything up. (Looks like a landing strip, which is why it's nicknamed Run Way lighting) You can see one of the LED's on the top of the main rail on the picture below.

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We've gone over the trailer from the coupler to the tail lights, but the one thing that I think I like most about it is that it was built with the future in mind. The trailer was built a little longer then it needs to be, because when Bruce decides to upgrade from the 240 to his next boat a Hallett 270, they just pop the saddle box off, put on two smaller tool boxes on the main rails and redo the bunks!

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For more information on this trailer, to refurbish your trailer, or have one built please call Adrenaline Trailers at 928-680-1030 or visit www.adrenalinetrailers.com
 

Dettom

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Nice work.. Those guys are the best in the business.
 

J DUNN

Hallett 240 Owner
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Great looking trailer. Some good designing in the details. Nice Job.
 

ka0tyk

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glad he went with c channel instead of box tube. it'll last forever that way. i still cant get rid of my c channel competitive trailer. everyone i know with a box tube trailer eventually has to have it completely replaced. my frame is from the 70's and it'll probably out live me.
 

Sonic45SS

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Very, very nice trailer. Those guys turn out some nice stuff ! Attention to detail means a lot. Congrats to the owner on a real nice trailer.
 

Wavemaker

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Very well planned out, and very impressive appearance.:cool
 

TPC

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We now know who's building our next trailer. :thumbsup
 

throttle

c ya on da lake
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Nice! My boat trailer is on the list of things to be redone this fall.
 

tkrrox

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i don't know technical terms but it looks like the little pad down the v is keeping it from sitting all the way forward...might just be how it's on the trailer now.
 

Cray Paper

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glad he went with c channel instead of box tube. it'll last forever that way. i still cant get rid of my c channel competitive trailer. everyone i know with a box tube trailer eventually has to have it completely replaced. my frame is from the 70's and it'll probably out live me.
The key to that trailer is they didn't use square tube or inferior C channel. They used bent plate. It's heavier and costs more but it's anywhere from 15% to 30% stronger. It would be interesting to know what that trailer weights.

That's a badd ass trailer that will live a really long life and the workmanship is fantastic. The owner has definitely future proofed.
 

C-2

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Holy crap that's nice. Way to go :thumbsup
 

Bucketlist

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So I am the guy that persuaded Wayne Sr. at Adrenaline into building this trailer for me.

Wayne and I started discussing the concept of what I wanted in a new trailer back in February 2016. Following our initial phone conversation, I then prepared a 14 page excel document that specified all of special requests, build processes, options and it also listed most of the part manufactures and even part #?s that were to be used. Wayne helped fill in the blanks on items that I was not familiar with and in the end I got a better trailer than I had originally dreamed of.

First I would like to thank RDP Dave for doing an incredible write up on my new trailer. The day I picked the trailer up at Adrenaline, Dave showed up with camera in hand and we watched my old boat get loaded onto the finished trailer. This was the first time I had met Dave and somehow I managed to convince Dave to have a couple beers with me. And the funny thing is Dave and I drink the same beer. Imagine the odds of that!

I also want to thank Wayne Sr., JR and the whole crew at Adrenaline for being so attentive to the meticulous detail I wanted and being patient with me throughout the entire build process. I had a great experience and I would not hesitate to recommend them or even do it all over again. These guys at Adrenaline are first rate, accommodating and I have made new friends in our small world of boating.

As I began the process of designing this trailer, there were 3 things that I focused on:

1st- the new trailer needed to survive launching in salt water. I think we have really accomplished this goal stopping just short of a galvanized trailer.

2nd -I literally designed the trailer and suspension around the tires. Every trailer I have had over the last 40+ years with 14? and 15? trailer rated ST radial tires have ALL had tire failures. Typically for me the tires fail from tread separation. Usually when this happens the fender is then damaged and the tire always fails in the middle of the damn desert in 110+ degree heat. I have tried nearly every top name brand tire mentioned on the boards and I have always replaced them before year three. I always run the tires at full rated pressure, store the trailer indoors out of the sun and maintained them like a hawk. I even road force balance my tires. And still the damn tires fail way too often. My research and personal opinion leads me to believe that all Trailer Tires are crap. Now assuming that the tires are properly inflated and NOT overloaded, I believe that the real cause radial trailer tires fail is primarily due to ?sidewall loading? (the act of twisting the bottom of the tires like a pretzel in slow maneuvering conditions). Sidewall loading on especially smaller tires (14? and 15?), and which are carrying loads at near full rated capacity begin to fail internally (rubber tread tears from the internal belts and fail over a period of time). So my solution (actually overkill) to this problem was to install a 16? Michelin XPS RIB Tire, load range E that have full steel casings. This tire kicks ass. There is no sidewall deflection or movement when I maneuver the trailer in tight turning situations.

3rd ? I wanted a trailer that was highly customized, had all the options and fulfilled my childhood dream of having a really bitchin trailer that I could never afford when I was younger.


Some of the things I had included in the trailer build that Dave?s original article did not mention are:

**UFP Zinc Plated torsion arm suspension and Aluminum Calipers for salt water corrosion resistance. I considered stainless steel calipers but determined not necessary for how I use this boat.

** Normally on a trailer this size would have a 6? rail profile. But I have had frame deflection on previous trailers behind the last axel. I was not going to have that problem on this trailer. So Wayne and I discussed at length using an 8? rail section. I have to be honest I was really worried about what it would look like especially with the tall tires, but in the end I love the tough heavy duty look that it achieved.

**All loose hardware (that was not required to be a high strength fastener) throughout the entire trailer is stainless steel. Bolts, carriage bolts, washers, nuts, screws, etc. Everywhere, including the wood bunks.

**The brake lines are stainless steel tubing. I did NOT want the typical modern thermosplastic brake lines that look like a garden hose hanging from the frame rail. I like the look of exposed neatly routed stainless lines. Very old school.

**I wanted most all of the welds exposed and NOT ground and bondoed. I really like and prefer the look of a good looking exposed craftsman weld. Again old school.

**White LED Backup lights are installed at a 45 degree angle under the rear fender step plates. These lights are for maneuvering and project the light to the side and back of the trailer, thereby lighting the path of where I am turning the trailer. Backup lights on the back of the trailer do not function well. These work.

** I had extra 15? LED running lights installed on the front frame rails as well as LED button lights near the 20,000lb UFP coupler. Normally a total of three 15? LED stop and running lights are installed on a rear rail of a trailer this size. I figured 6 had to be better. And Adrenaline beefed up and reinforced the rear frame rail to accommodate all of these lights.

**The front storage box is fabricated entirely from 12ga stainless plate steel. It is sized to warehouse all of my tire changing tools including a full size floor jack, portable ViAir compressor, spare parts, tools, wood blocks, mat to lay on, hitch bag and accessories. My thought was if I buy all of this shit then I will never have to change a tire again!

** I have installed a tire pressure monitoring system on all 6 tires that monitors both temperature and pressure. A readout screen is located in my tow vehicle. My thought here is that I will be able to detect a bearing problem or a tire run flat problem before any damage is done.

**I wanted a high end paint job. Adrenaline delivered. Bare steel was acid etched. Then 1 coat of acid etch primer followed by 1 coat of a primer sealer. Then two coats of color base coat and then finished with 3 coats of PPG Global Clear Coat. I will now be able to color sand and maintain an automotive like finish on my trailer. Crazy yes, but damn nice. And I purchased a set of Rock Tamer Mud Flaps for my tow vehicle to help protect against road rash. They are a bit goofey looking but my trailer will not be killed with gravel rash.

** Along with my Michelin tires I also installed Centerline Forged wheels with a triple plate chrome finish. Again this fulfilled another childhood dream. I always wanted a set of Centerlines, but could never afford them. These wheels have zero offset and have a load carrying capacity of 3,200lbs each. I am totally stoked with how they turned out and I can?t imagine any pothole or curb ever being able to bend this wheel, not that I am going to try. I installed stainless steel open end center hubs by Excalibur along with Gorilla stainless lug nuts and locking nuts. And yes I road force balanced all 7 wheels to make sure they were round and in tolerance. All wheel studs have anti seize applied to them for corrosion resistance before the lug nuts were installed.

**The front jack is a 7,000lb capacity drop leg jack that is bolted to the trailer. As Wayne Sr. said, if you damage this jack we can replace it without having to repaint the frame. Great idea lets do it.

** The trailer has suspension components that are designed to carry nearly twice the actual gross combination weight of both trailer and fully loaded boat. My thoughts were?.. bigger is better?.. and stronger lasts longer. I have three 4,200lb UFP torsion axels. Way overkill. Even with the overkill suspension, the trailer rides and tows incredibly smooth. I do not have to worry about some kid at a repair shop with a forklift maneuvering my trailer around in close quarters and breaking the rear axle. The UFP technical rep. confirmed that a triple axle set up using these weight rated torsion axles will perform flawlessly in my situation.

** Disk brakes on all 3 axles fed by a 1600 psi Hydrastar Electric over Hydraulic braking system. The trailer stops on a dime and will stop my tow vehicle. The stopping power is smooth and phenomenal. No more fear of panic brake situations. I will never again have a surge brake system period.

** Wiring harness has 100% heat shrink connections all neatly loomed and routed under the upper rolled edge of the frame channel.

** I will be pin striping the trailer frame rails using hot rod design touches. I will also have red lettered ?Keep Off? painted on the top of the fenders, which once again is old school from my childhood.

**All fender step pads and fender skirts are constructed out of 5 bar aluminum plate that has been powder coated. The fender step pads are attached to the steel under structure using a stainless steel countersunk stainless steel Flat Head Cap Machine Screws. Step Plates are fully embedded in a silicone to prevent trapped water between the aluminum plate and steel substructure. Again concerned about salt water.

**Upon final pickup, Adrenaline delivered a nicely organized box of to carry all of the spare parts I specified along with an organized 3 ring binder that included the warranty, my detailed trailer specifications with all part #? and manufacture names.
 

Sonic45SS

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So I am the guy that persuaded Wayne Sr. at Adrenaline into building this trailer for me.

Wayne and I started discussing the concept of what I wanted in a new trailer back in February 2016. Following our initial phone conversation, I then prepared a 14 page excel document that specified all of special requests, build processes, options and it also listed most of the part manufactures and even part #?s that were to be used. Wayne helped fill in the blanks on items that I was not familiar with and in the end I got a better trailer than I had originally dreamed of.

First I would like to thank RDP Dave for doing an incredible write up on my new trailer. The day I picked the trailer up at Adrenaline, Dave showed up with camera in hand and we watched my old boat get loaded onto the finished trailer. This was the first time I had met Dave and somehow I managed to convince Dave to have a couple beers with me. And the funny thing is Dave and I drink the same beer. Imagine the odds of that!

I also want to thank Wayne Sr., JR and the whole crew at Adrenaline for being so attentive to the meticulous detail I wanted and being patient with me throughout the entire build process. I had a great experience and I would not hesitate to recommend them or even do it all over again. These guys at Adrenaline are first rate, accommodating and I have made new friends in our small world of boating.

As I began the process of designing this trailer, there were 3 things that I focused on:

1st- the new trailer needed to survive launching in salt water. I think we have really accomplished this goal stopping just short of a galvanized trailer.

2nd -I literally designed the trailer and suspension around the tires. Every trailer I have had over the last 40+ years with 14? and 15? trailer rated ST radial tires have ALL had tire failures. Typically for me the tires fail from tread separation. Usually when this happens the fender is then damaged and the tire always fails in the middle of the damn desert in 110+ degree heat. I have tried nearly every top name brand tire mentioned on the boards and I have always replaced them before year three. I always run the tires at full rated pressure, store the trailer indoors out of the sun and maintained them like a hawk. I even road force balance my tires. And still the damn tires fail way too often. My research and personal opinion leads me to believe that all Trailer Tires are crap. Now assuming that the tires are properly inflated and NOT overloaded, I believe that the real cause radial trailer tires fail is primarily due to ?sidewall loading? (the act of twisting the bottom of the tires like a pretzel in slow maneuvering conditions). Sidewall loading on especially smaller tires (14? and 15?), and which are carrying loads at near full rated capacity begin to fail internally (rubber tread tears from the internal belts and fail over a period of time). So my solution (actually overkill) to this problem was to install a 16? Michelin XPS RIB Tire, load range E that have full steel casings. This tire kicks ass. There is no sidewall deflection or movement when I maneuver the trailer in tight turning situations.

3rd ? I wanted a trailer that was highly customized, had all the options and fulfilled my childhood dream of having a really bitchin trailer that I could never afford when I was younger.


Some of the things I had included in the trailer build that Dave?s original article did not mention are:

**UFP Zinc Plated torsion arm suspension and Aluminum Calipers for salt water corrosion resistance. I considered stainless steel calipers but determined not necessary for how I use this boat.

** Normally on a trailer this size would have a 6? rail profile. But I have had frame deflection on previous trailers behind the last axel. I was not going to have that problem on this trailer. So Wayne and I discussed at length using an 8? rail section. I have to be honest I was really worried about what it would look like especially with the tall tires, but in the end I love the tough heavy duty look that it achieved.

**All loose hardware (that was not required to be a high strength fastener) throughout the entire trailer is stainless steel. Bolts, carriage bolts, washers, nuts, screws, etc. Everywhere, including the wood bunks.

**The brake lines are stainless steel tubing. I did NOT want the typical modern thermosplastic brake lines that look like a garden hose hanging from the frame rail. I like the look of exposed neatly routed stainless lines. Very old school.

**I wanted most all of the welds exposed and NOT ground and bondoed. I really like and prefer the look of a good looking exposed craftsman weld. Again old school.

**White LED Backup lights are installed at a 45 degree angle under the rear fender step plates. These lights are for maneuvering and project the light to the side and back of the trailer, thereby lighting the path of where I am turning the trailer. Backup lights on the back of the trailer do not function well. These work.

** I had extra 15? LED running lights installed on the front frame rails as well as LED button lights near the 20,000lb UFP coupler. Normally a total of three 15? LED stop and running lights are installed on a rear rail of a trailer this size. I figured 6 had to be better. And Adrenaline beefed up and reinforced the rear frame rail to accommodate all of these lights.

**The front storage box is fabricated entirely from 12ga stainless plate steel. It is sized to warehouse all of my tire changing tools including a full size floor jack, portable ViAir compressor, spare parts, tools, wood blocks, mat to lay on, hitch bag and accessories. My thought was if I buy all of this shit then I will never have to change a tire again!

** I have installed a tire pressure monitoring system on all 6 tires that monitors both temperature and pressure. A readout screen is located in my tow vehicle. My thought here is that I will be able to detect a bearing problem or a tire run flat problem before any damage is done.

**I wanted a high end paint job. Adrenaline delivered. Bare steel was acid etched. Then 1 coat of acid etch primer followed by 1 coat of a primer sealer. Then two coats of color base coat and then finished with 3 coats of PPG Global Clear Coat. I will now be able to color sand and maintain an automotive like finish on my trailer. Crazy yes, but damn nice. And I purchased a set of Rock Tamer Mud Flaps for my tow vehicle to help protect against road rash. They are a bit goofey looking but my trailer will not be killed with gravel rash.

** Along with my Michelin tires I also installed Centerline Forged wheels with a triple plate chrome finish. Again this fulfilled another childhood dream. I always wanted a set of Centerlines, but could never afford them. These wheels have zero offset and have a load carrying capacity of 3,200lbs each. I am totally stoked with how they turned out and I can?t imagine any pothole or curb ever being able to bend this wheel, not that I am going to try. I installed stainless steel open end center hubs by Excalibur along with Gorilla stainless lug nuts and locking nuts. And yes I road force balanced all 7 wheels to make sure they were round and in tolerance. All wheel studs have anti seize applied to them for corrosion resistance before the lug nuts were installed.

**The front jack is a 7,000lb capacity drop leg jack that is bolted to the trailer. As Wayne Sr. said, if you damage this jack we can replace it without having to repaint the frame. Great idea lets do it.

** The trailer has suspension components that are designed to carry nearly twice the actual gross combination weight of both trailer and fully loaded boat. My thoughts were?.. bigger is better?.. and stronger lasts longer. I have three 4,200lb UFP torsion axels. Way overkill. Even with the overkill suspension, the trailer rides and tows incredibly smooth. I do not have to worry about some kid at a repair shop with a forklift maneuvering my trailer around in close quarters and breaking the rear axle. The UFP technical rep. confirmed that a triple axle set up using these weight rated torsion axles will perform flawlessly in my situation.

** Disk brakes on all 3 axles fed by a 1600 psi Hydrastar Electric over Hydraulic braking system. The trailer stops on a dime and will stop my tow vehicle. The stopping power is smooth and phenomenal. No more fear of panic brake situations. I will never again have a surge brake system period.

** Wiring harness has 100% heat shrink connections all neatly loomed and routed under the upper rolled edge of the frame channel.

** I will be pin striping the trailer frame rails using hot rod design touches. I will also have red lettered ?Keep Off? painted on the top of the fenders, which once again is old school from my childhood.

**All fender step pads and fender skirts are constructed out of 5 bar aluminum plate that has been powder coated. The fender step pads are attached to the steel under structure using a stainless steel countersunk stainless steel Flat Head Cap Machine Screws. Step Plates are fully embedded in a silicone to prevent trapped water between the aluminum plate and steel substructure. Again concerned about salt water.

**Upon final pickup, Adrenaline delivered a nicely organized box of to carry all of the spare parts I specified along with an organized 3 ring binder that included the warranty, my detailed trailer specifications with all part #? and manufacture names.
Again......Awesome build and attention to detail. We think alike in trailer construction. A lot of similarities in what you and I both did with our new trailer construction. Only 3 companies I would have build a full custom trailer for me: Myco, and adrenaline are one of the ones I would use, quality and craftsmanship, and not to mention the details and rigging are second to none.

I went all out too in the construction of mine. If you want it, can afford it and have the company to construct it. Then by all means do it up like you like it. A lot of people don't realize all the details unless you sometimes point them out. I was a year back and forth designing my trailer, with outfit and customizations, changes and additions. I know exactly what you went thru and accomplished. The end product shows it. Not to hi-jack or change the subject, but if you would like to compare some notes, I posted mine here last year when it was complete in post #12. Covers the highlights. >http://www.riverdavesplace.com/forums/showthread.php?134085-Custom-Clean-Boat-Trailers/page2

Threads like these help others with options and choice selections when they want to build their custom trailer or what ever. Thanks for posting up this thread.

Congrats again, awesome trailer.
 

28Eliminator

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Very nice:thumbsup

My brother just had his trailer repainted by Adrenalin. Very reasonable and he said it came out bitchin... and he's not easy to impress.
 
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