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Egyptian grave robbing

Javajoe

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So...over the years I often wondered why in the hell are the pyramids tombs of the dead desecrated for the benefit of tourism. Yea yea yea we hear about all the science behind the finds they discover but why is no one up in arms about this. Really amazes me. It is not like they are just protecting what is found as they are actively searching more and more over the years. Thoughts???
 

spectras only

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So...over the years I often wondered why in the hell are the pyramids tombs of the dead desecrated for the benefit of tourism. Yea yea yea we hear about all the science behind the finds they discover but why is no one up in arms about this. Really amazes me. It is not like they are just protecting what is found as they are actively searching more and more over the years. Thoughts???
Well, the good thing is, the pyramids are in Egypt, not Portland or other dem cities where rioters tearing down statues and monuments. The pyramids were built with slave power, so it would be torn down if it was erected in the US, instead, ;) 😜
BTW, pharaohs were buried other locations than pyramids. King Tut was found outside ,underground.
 

Carlson-jet

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Funny you say that JJ. I always thought the same thing. Those are tombs not exploration caverns.
Anything learning does not account for the disrespect.
 

GRADS

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I studied King Tut in depth as a kid...it was weird but something about it was fascinating to me. Bad things happened to the dudes that found his tomb. Leave that shit alone.
 

4Waters

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I studied King Tut in depth as a kid...it was weird but something about it was fascinating to me. Bad things happened to the dudes that found his tomb. Leave that shit alone.
Now that shit interests my daughter and myself, if I remember I'll do a little research tomorrow.
 

TPC

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The museums get to what's little left after the thieves robbed most of it.
Like Herculaneum and Pompeii I love it when they uncover this stuff.
 

Javajoe

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I have always been fascinated since King Tut was discovered but it was later in life when Indian burial grounds that were disturbed became a big deal and shut down construction sites that I came to wonder why nobody gave a shit about Digging up the Pharaoh’s, etc. and how they went to great lengths to be buried a certain way and not to be just stumbled upon
 

floatn turd

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I love History.

It all needs to be protected.
But it all depends what side of the fence you're on. (IMO)

One side:
Bringing "knowledge of the past" to the world, often means disturbing or desecrating some artifacts, holy places, sites, ship wrecks, battle fields, ancient cities, ETC.
There are bad or unintended consequences to doing all that.

But, it gives us:
Museums. (so people can see & learn) Knowledge for History books / future generations.
And the chance for kids to become interested in History and even make career choices based on that interest.

On the the other side of the fence:
Are "Historical Purists".
They want to preserve the past and keep it untouched / unmolested.
Which is good & noble and 100% needed in some instances.

The down side to that is:
It's hard to "care" much about something, if it's largely unknown.

Sadly, I think this has happened to the idiot young people you saw tearing down statues all summer long.

They have zero knowledge, respect or value for the past.
History and what it can teach us has taken a back seat in Schools / Colleges in order to push other agendas and "social change".

It's a sad deal.
And I hope "the system" is changed before it's too late.

FT
 

Ziggy

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I love History.

It all needs to be protected.
But it all depends what side of the fence you're on. (IMO)

One side:
Bringing "knowledge of the past" to the world, often means disturbing or desecrating some artifacts, holy places, sites, ship wrecks, battle fields, ancient cities, ETC.
There are bad or unintended consequences to doing all that.

But, it gives us:
Museums. (so people can see & learn) Knowledge for History books / future generations.
And the chance for kids to become interested in History and even make career choices based on that interest.

On the the other side of the fence:
Are "Historical Purists".
They want to preserve the past and keep it untouched / unmolested.
Which is good & noble and 100% needed in some instances.

The down side to that is:
It's hard to "care" much about something, if it's largely unknown.

Sadly, I think this has happened to the idiot young people you saw tearing down statues all summer long.

They have zero knowledge, respect or value for the past.
History and what it can teach us has taken a back seat in Schools / Colleges in order to push other agendas and "social change".

It's a sad deal.
And I hope "the system" is changed before it's too late.

FT
When you take in or learn nothing from the past we dumbass humans most often end up repeating history.
 

Carlson-jet

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When you take in or learn nothing from the past we dumbass humans most often end up repeating history.
Ya, we all die. That part of history is pretty much down pat unless you have other proof. :p
 

coolchange

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Back when I was pushing wrenches I had a customer that used to go to Egypt to vacation every year.
He would go deep into new digs, the arc and shroud type stuff. It cost him well into six figures to do it.
 

TITTIES AND BEER

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I’ve heard stories of people ( big shot rich people now ) in St George years ago that would go out to this little Indian reservation out side of SG on the Back way to Mesquite,Nv And go to the grave yard and dig up graves new / old and take what ever they could find and leave grave / corpse just laying there 😫
 

monkeyswrench

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The former head of antiquities and such out of Egypt had been using the pyramids as his personal bank account for 40 years. He'd charge "fees" for research from other countries, as well as massive charges for the use of anything in museums. I'm sure this had gone on before he was in control, just bigger numbers now. About the time of the Arab spring, he was ousted.
There have always been those profiting on the deaths of others. At least these guys waited until the corpses were past cold, and almost dust.
 

pronstar

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Yeah, they were aliens,lol :D Experts still can't agree on 100 percent the age of pyramids, 3000, 4000 or even older, and how they were built!
They’re so old, Cleopatra lived closer (in years) to the first man on the moon, than she did to the building of the pyramids.


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pronstar

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The former head of antiquities and such out of Egypt had been using the pyramids as his personal bank account for 40 years. He'd charge "fees" for research from other countries, as well as massive charges for the use of anything in museums. I'm sure this had gone on before he was in control, just bigger numbers now. About the time of the Arab spring, he was ousted.
There have always been those profiting on the deaths of others. At least these guys waited until the corpses were past cold, and almost dust.
It’s sucks that he (Zahi Hawass) was a criminal...because he was great in a number of historical documentaries on Egyptian history and artifacts.

I was a fan.


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monkeyswrench

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It’s sucks that he (Zahi Hawass) was a criminal...because he was great in a number of historical documentaries on Egyptian history and artifacts.

I was a fan.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk Pro
I would think "proffiteer" more than criminal. I see both sides of it. Yes, he made good money, but if he had not let people do the research they did, we would know less as a race. Most of the middle east has been off limits to the west. By their government letting others see things, it may have helped protect them in some ways. Isis destroyed temples not aligned with their beliefs...but they were lesser known. I think the massive noteriety of the pyramids will keep them from meeting the same fate.
 

Taboma

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During my brief period of living in Germany almost 50 years ago, I worked with German civilians. I was surprised to learn, that in Germany (Not sure about other European countries) when a family member passes, the surviving family can lease a plot in a cemetery for periods of 15 to 30 years. It's not a forever purchase like here, only a termed lease. At the end of that lease period, surviving family is contacted and given the opportunity to renew or not. If not or if nobody responds the remains, if there are any (Often not), are buried deeper and the headstone is removed. The spot above will then be available for a new lease.

The cemeteries I visited in Frankfurt were the most beautiful and serene places in the city, especially in contrast to the harsh appearance of the WWII German barracks I was housed in.
Because it's a leased plot, it was common to see families tending to the sites on weekends, growing flowers on the plot and sitting around having a picnic, enjoying the quiet and beauty.
Would seem that not all cultures place any spiritual significance on the remains of the dead.
 

monkeyswrench

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During my brief period of living in Germany almost 50 years ago, I worked with German civilians. I was surprised to learn, that in Germany (Not sure about other European countries) when a family member passes, the surviving family can lease a plot in a cemetery for periods of 15 to 30 years. It's not a forever purchase like here, only a termed lease. At the end of that lease period, surviving family is contacted and given the opportunity to renew or not. If not or if nobody responds the remains, if there are any (Often not), are buried deeper and the headstone is removed. The spot above will then be available for a new lease.

The cemeteries I visited in Frankfurt were the most beautiful and serene places in the city, especially in contrast to the harsh appearance of the WWII German barracks I was housed in.
Because it's a leased plot, it was common to see families tending to the sites on weekends, growing flowers on the plot and sitting around having a picnic, enjoying the quiet and beauty.
Would seem that not all cultures place any spiritual significance on the remains of the dead.
After reading "Hamlet" in school, I looked into European burial traditions. Act IV...."Alas poor Yorick, I knew him Horatio, a man of infinite jest..." This was as the grave digger speaking of and to the skull of a friend.
For centuries, the dead were burried, and often burried deeper for the next round. Many times the remains are mixed with others. In thousands of years, the next group of palientologists will just be confuddled at what happened there, or why the space was used like it is here.
I'm all for the Norse rituals, put me in a boat, burried or lit ablaze ;)
 

Taboma

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After reading "Hamlet" in school, I looked into European burial traditions. Act IV...."Alas poor Yorick, I knew him Horatio, a man of infinite jest..." This was as the grave digger speaking of and to the skull of a friend.
For centuries, the dead were burried, and often burried deeper for the next round. Many times the remains are mixed with others. In thousands of years, the next group of palientologists will just be confuddled at what happened there, or why the space was used like it is here.
I'm all for the Norse rituals, put me in a boat, burried or lit ablaze ;)
I personally place no real significance on the post-death physical remains. The dead live on in our memories, in our stories and photographic records, not recycled flesh and bones.
 

Shlbyntro

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That would be news to me.. ??
It is my understanding that they are now believed to have been somewhere between something along the lines of an indentured servant and that of employees of a "company town" where multiple family generations lived and worked together on the building project in some aspect or another and many of them were literate. They were well fed and housed and were respected by other Egyptians of the era, it was considered an honor to be a part of the building project.

The origins of the phonetic alphabet is attributed to that of egyptian quarry workers developed as a short hand/abbreviated writing form for faster communication between work sites connected to the building project.
 

monkeyswrench

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I personally place no real significance on the post-death physical remains. The dead live on in our memories, in our stories and photographic records, not recycled flesh and bones.
All that makes us different than a sack of meat is how we effect one another. Our ideas and thoughts, good or bad, create what others think of us or remember us as. The body is just a vessel that helps facilitate that. Once life, soul, whatever you call it, leaves that vessel, all that's left is what others remember.

When I kick, I'd like friends and family to have a BBQ, with loud music, and maybe a loud motor or two ;)
 

Wheeler

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It is my understanding that they are now believed to have been somewhere between something along the lines of an indentured servant and that of employees of a "company town" where multiple family generations lived and worked together on the building project in some aspect or another and many of them were literate. They were well fed and housed and were respected by other Egyptians of the era, it was considered an honor to be a part of the building project.

The origins of the phonetic alphabet is attributed to that of egyptian quarry workers developed as a short hand/abbreviated writing form for faster communication between work sites connected to the building project.
Sounds kinda like the Kaiser mine operation.

Maybe @gigamurph could fill us in on how it was to live in that era.
 
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