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Heavy gel oxidation, which compound?

sintax

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So my dads boats been in his back yard for years covered, and its taken a toll the gel. I was going to clean it up for him as best I can.

I've read quite a few different methods, and it seems like I'll try a heavy compound, along with a heavy foam pad on a porter cable DA buffer.

So which direction do I go? Chemical Guys, Boat Candy, 3M?

If I cant make any progress is the next step to wet sand it? if so, what is my paper grade progression? Should I use some type of block for even pressure?
 

HBCraig

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Look at McGuires products. They have a line that has difference compounds, waxes and polishes.
 

wzuber

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Look at McGuires products. They have a line that has difference compounds, waxes and polishes.
Mc Guires, 3m all good products. Mc G's has some good info in their forum section as well as some vids. I believe. Also some pretty good info. from detailing guys, diy'rs on u-tube etc. Your local detailing supply house may be helpful too depending on their attitude etc. (some places have or can recommend training schools too) Try to pick 1 method, advisor, process, system etc. and stick with it. Also a dampened (always start with a wet'd/ringed out pad) twisted wool pad will help the initial cut with the compound, use light pressure and keep it moving, slow even movement, like dancing a waltz so to speak. Use one pad only for each grit level and use a dressing tool to clean the pad and keep the fibers open to help prevent heat/burn. You can also call the compound mfg. tech line for specif help, insight etc. Start with slow speed until you get comfortable and see what is required to achieve your objective, then slowly speed the rpm and progress. For wet sanding if it's extremely heavy ox. you can start with 800, then 1200,1500,2000 etc. If med. ox then start with 1200 etc. Look for some rigid foam/rubber blocks to keep the flats flat, soft/flexable f/rubber to conform to the radius's etc. Your not trying to remove all the ox. with the first grit level but reduce it down so as you start to see the ox disappear and color come thru move on to the next finer grit and then lastly the compound, SEALER WAX and the finish wax. Initially, in a less conspicuous area than say the middle of the deck, work the complete system in a 3' sq. area to get a feel for the process then repeat as necessary around the hull. Also use the adhesive backed wet dry paper, use wet. A bucket of water with some dish soap to help with surface lubricity works well. To do it right your initial investment will be a bit spendy (buffer tool, pads etc.) but worth it in the end if you use your newly developed skills to maintain your vehicles etc. for the future. (maybe even start a detailing business for some side $?) Gel coat is a good place to start because it's typically more durable and forgiving (thicker too) than automotive paint/clearcoats. Do your homework, be patient, have fun and enjoy the process. Hopefully you'll share the awesome results with us when your done and happy. Good luck, I hope this is of some help to you.
 

02HoWaRd26

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My plan this year is a light low speed 800 wet, then 1200 wet then faster 2000 wet, followed by blue magic or briwax then a good caranuba wax, or just to have mine ceramic coated
 

wzuber

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My plan this year is a light low speed 800 wet, then 1200 wet then faster 2000 wet, followed by blue magic or briwax then a good caranuba wax, or just to have mine ceramic coated
Interesting, you do this with a pneumatic DA or file?
 

02HoWaRd26

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Interesting, you do this with a pneumatic DA or file?
I’d use an electric da/buffer i may start at 1200 less scary for sure. I’ve done my dash and few smaller sections as well a spot on the side as a test and came out gorgeous but still...... scary and the time is one thing vs the mess to make while doing this. Gotta have it detailed after I’m done would be even better to remove my front interior as well my canopies we will see when i dig in this winter
 

wzuber

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I’d use an electric da/buffer i may start at 1200 less scary for sure. I’ve done my dash and few smaller sections as well a spot on the side as a test and came out gorgeous but still...... scary and the time is one thing vs the mess to make while doing this. Gotta have it detailed after I’m done would be even better to remove my front interior as well my canopies we will see when i dig in this winter
interesting, cool. thanks for the update. It never occurred to me to try a d.a. of any sort but I'm just beginner so treading lightly after having started a little too aggressive with 800 by hand on an already thin wore out gel from previous owners efforts. The hull is black/red/blue and was cooked in the sun. It had been burned thru the red into black in areas so a good candidate to learn on as it was already messed up. Just trying to clean and shine whats left of the patina. haha. Tried to buff out the 800 with compound but wouldn't get it so went back to 1500/2000/compound, etc. It's coming around. Used 1500/2000/compound wet/hand on the ox. red dash and it turned out surprisingly beautiful, thought it might be too far gone. 18' advantage jet.
I hope when you get to yours you will post a thread and share your experiences with us learnin peeps. Thanks for the reply.
 
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