WELCOME TO RIVER DAVES PLACE

Just when you think society can't get any more stupid....wtf.... costco crates??? really?

paradise

Spooner
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Check this out, looks like it's no even ply it's OSB... I feel bad because the old man is at least out making something and is obviously proud but damn....

 

azsunfun

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not wake boats safe, yup life vest cause looks like uncle john had a couple during assembly.
 

coolchange

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The guys a little behind times at least in concept.
Back in the day the owner of Rewarder headers had that idea. Basically folded or collapsed and could be put in a truck. More of a dock or party platform. Don’t remember if he built a prototype or not.
With inflatable paddle boards etc I think that would be the way to go.
 

dspracing

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So my buddies and I used to do an annual trip where we would collect supplies, build a raft on the beach in the middle of the night and float from Blythe to fishers landing. This was our biggest one I think it was 12x16 and we had the 4 of us plus our gear on it. I think it was 8 55gal drums
6B1C1A94-544B-4BB2-8B53-3910F4AFB96D.jpeg

This one used two sailboat hulls we found. Didn’t have enough flotation so we had to buy an inflatable raft for our beer and extra gear.
907D8C8C-C5A6-47FF-BF8C-476689AC6405.jpeg
 
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ChiliPepperGarage

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Sure youre dropping $30 on bins but the real expense is clearly the plywood. Have you priced that shit out lately? Its literally worth its weight in gold. Literally.
No. A 1/2" sheet of CDX weighs 40.6 pounds or 1299.2 ounces and gold is selling for $1804.27 / ounce so a sheet of plywood would be $2,344,107.58 if it were LITERALY worth its weight in gold! It's expensive but not quite that crazy yet (With Biden though, it might get there!)
 

LazyLavey

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Message from Captain Dennis, Inventor of the Porta-Pontoon
"Thank you for your interest in my patented Porta-Pontoon boat. I welcome you to read my book about the origin of my invention entitled Porta-Pontoon"

This "invention" is the most significant contribution to the boating industry in the modern world... or since the civil war
 

Mike K

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Perfect …. throw it in the channel on busy weekends … instant party barge … $30 per person & beer … your in business for $800. NOT!
 

just_floatin

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If there is a stripper pole option, I’m in yo! Park it under my Walmart ez-up this weekend in the channel.
 

mjc

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New boat for the homeless guy in the channel.
 

Big B Hova

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Only a matter of days before someone buys one and puts a 400 outboard on the back.

Then Rubbermaid crates will increase 500%
 

mash on it

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So my buddies and I used to do an annual trip where we would collect supplies, build a raft on the beach in the middle of the night and float from Blythe to fishers landing. This was our biggest one I think it was 12x16 and we had the 4 of us plus our gear on it. I think it was 8 55gal drums
I considered building an 8 drum pontoon for the Bullhead city float, and using a wave runner for power after the event (no propulsion allowed). At the concept is sound.

Dan'l
 

rrrr

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The guys a little behind times at least in concept.
Back in the day the owner of Rewarder headers had that idea. Basically folded or collapsed and could be put in a truck. More of a dock or party platform. Don’t remember if he built a prototype or not.
With inflatable paddle boards etc I think that would be the way to go.
Time for another rrrr RDP History Lesson™.

In WWII, the Allies used the Goatley collapsible boat for crossing rivers. The boat had a plywood bottom and canvas sides. Their most famous use was the crossing of the Waal River in Nijmegen, Holland in September 1944.

Members of the 3rd Battalion, 504th Parachute Infantry Regiment, 82nd Airborne Division, used the collapsible boats to cross the Waal under murderous German fire. The engineers and soldiers manning the boats made multiple crossings, while taking many casualties. In spite of that, the paratroopers captured the railroad bridge over the Waal, which allowed tanks and other heavy vehicles to cross.

I heard a first hand telling of the story from Lt Colonel (Ret) James Megellas, who was a Lieutenant in H Company, 3rd Battalion at the time of the crossing. "Maggie", as he was known, was the most decorated WWII soldier in the 82nd Airborne.

He described the incredible bravery he and his men displayed, rowing the flimsy collapsible boats across the hundred meter wide Waal under fire, using their M1 rifles as paddles because the boats had been furnished with just a few pairs of paddles.

Prior to this event, the 504th took part in the January 1944 amphibious landing at Anzio, Italy. The troops were almost pushed back into the sea, but determination and bravery won out, even though casualties were high. In December 1944, Maggie and his battalion fought in the Battle of the Bulge, an action which took the lives of over 12,000 US troops.

I was fortunate to know Megellas. He exemplified the character and fortitude of the US Army troops that invaded Europe and conquered the Nazi war machine. Maggie served with the Army for twenty years, and retired as a Lt Col in 1962. He died in April 2020, at the age of 103.

Megellas took part in the crossing of the Waal River near Nijmegen, where the American forces crossed the river in flimsy boats while under heavy machine gun fire. On September 30, in Holland, Megellas single-handedly attacked a German observation post and machine gun nest.

For displaying extraordinary heroism that day, he was awarded the U.S. military's second-highest decoration, the Distinguished Service Cross. On December 20, for defeating the enemy at the base of a hill and rescuing one of his wounded men near Cheneux, Belgium, Megellas was awarded the Silver Star.

In late December, the regiment was rushed into the Battle of the Bulge. On January 28, 1945 Megellas' platoon was advancing towards Herresbach, Belgium. Struggling through heavy snow and freezing cold, they surprised 200 Germans who were advancing out of the town. Catching the Germans largely off-guard, the attack proved to be devastating, with the Americans killing and capturing a large number and causing many others to flee.

As they prepared to assault the town, however, a German Mark V tank took aim at them. Megellas ran towards it, and disabled it with a single grenade. Climbing on top of it, he then dropped another grenade into the tank, eliminating the threat to his men. He then led his men as they cleared and seized the town, and not one of his men was killed or injured. Although he was recommended for the Medal of Honor shortly afterward, he received the Silver Star (the German tank incident was not mentioned in his award citation).

Throughout the war, Megellas served with Company H, 504 PIR, which he would later come to command. In January 1946, he led his rifle company down Fifth Avenue in New York City's Victory Parade.



Take a look at the Goatley boat, and imagine yourself and nine or more men paddling it across a 100 meter wide river with a swift current. Add in fire from the deadly German 7.92 mm MG 42 machine gun, which had a 1,200 rounds per minute rate of fire, and the 80mm (3.15") GrW 34 mortar, which had a 20-25 RPM rate of fire. Brave? You're damned right it was.




News article in Maggie's hometown newspaper, published a few days after his death:

 
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