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Lake Mead Inactive Pool

bldrinker

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swimming pools are a fuck'n waist.... guess you havn't heard the roof raising battles at my havasu house...and notice that of all the homes I build.... none have pools... they waist water, power and beer money....
Oh that wasn’t your pool build a while back.

Just bustin your balls Steve.

I leave the water on while I brush my teeth. So I’m no better lol
 

2FORCEFULL

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Oh that wasn’t your pool build a while back.

Just bustin your balls Steve.

I leave the water on while I brush my teeth. So I’m no better lol
my wife had the vegas pool re plasterd... I wanted to fill it with dirt and put a garden, and get some chickens and rabbits...
 

2FORCEFULL

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22 years ago, I was told what was gonna happen to mead and how they were dropping the level 150'... so I lived long enought to see it happen....

things like this really make me love Switzerland's goverment.... here,... the people never get to vote on what the gov. does... in fact, they don't even tell you what they are doing ... or what they voted for..
 

4Waters

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if every one brushed with the hot water side they wouldn't just let it run,... and then wouldn't have to wait for hot water in the shower..
I brush after my shower, but like I said I don't let the water run much anymore, I'm getting better about it
 

2FORCEFULL

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More than its snow-capped mountains and nifty, collapsible army knives, Switzerland is perhaps best known for its system of democracy. Known as "direct" democracy, it’s a legal framework that enables all Swiss citizens over the age of 18 to vote on how the country is run.
The system has some high-powered admirers. France’s newly elected President Emmanuel Macron has said he wants a similar system of referendums in place for French voters. But it can also produce unexpected results, such as a veto on the building of minarets or a proposal for all cars to be banned from the roads on Sundays.
Here are a few other facts about Switzerland’s political system:
  • Switzerland has a population of 8.2 million people, of which 24% are foreign nationals, spread across 26 cantons.
  • The fundamental principle of direct democracy is that all citizens take part in decision-making and there’s a strong respect for minorities. Unfortunately, this wasn’t extended to women, who were not given the vote until 1971 (and even until 1991 in the case of one canton).
  • In the canton of Appenzell Innerrhoden, the People’s Assembly (Landsgemeinde) still chooses its representative in the Council of States by a show of hands.
  • The government, also called Federal Council, is the executive power. It is composed of seven Federal Councillors from several Swiss political parties, which are elected by the Federal Assembly every four years and share the duties of a head of state. Federal Councillors rotate and every year one takes on the role of president.
  • The Swiss political scene is dominated by four main parties: the Swiss People’s Party, the Social Democrats, the Liberals and the Christian Democratic Party.
  • In recent years, the Green Party has emerged, as well as a small number of minority parties. The “Anti PowerPoint Party”, for example, was a political party in Switzerland that worked to decrease the use of PowerPoint in professional presentations. They claimed that PowerPoint software was economically harmful.
  • Popular votes can be held up to four times a year. The Federal Council decides a couple of months in advance which proposals will be voted on and releases the dates of the votes even earlier. Currently all the dates have been fixed from now until 2034.

A rich backstory​

The democratic roots of Switzerland travel in many directions and cross several centuries. During the Renaissance, humanists striving for freedom from Rome offered different interpretations to religion that were closer to the needs of people and political independence.
 

2FORCEFULL

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More than its snow-capped mountains and nifty, collapsible army knives, Switzerland is perhaps best known for its system of democracy. Known as "direct" democracy, it’s a legal framework that enables all Swiss citizens over the age of 18 to vote on how the country is run.
The system has some high-powered admirers. France’s newly elected President Emmanuel Macron has said he wants a similar system of referendums in place for French voters. But it can also produce unexpected results, such as a veto on the building of minarets or a proposal for all cars to be banned from the roads on Sundays.
Here are a few other facts about Switzerland’s political system:
  • Switzerland has a population of 8.2 million people, of which 24% are foreign nationals, spread across 26 cantons.
  • The fundamental principle of direct democracy is that all citizens take part in decision-making and there’s a strong respect for minorities. Unfortunately, this wasn’t extended to women, who were not given the vote until 1971 (and even until 1991 in the case of one canton).
  • In the canton of Appenzell Innerrhoden, the People’s Assembly (Landsgemeinde) still chooses its representative in the Council of States by a show of hands.
  • The government, also called Federal Council, is the executive power. It is composed of seven Federal Councillors from several Swiss political parties, which are elected by the Federal Assembly every four years and share the duties of a head of state. Federal Councillors rotate and every year one takes on the role of president.
  • The Swiss political scene is dominated by four main parties: the Swiss People’s Party, the Social Democrats, the Liberals and the Christian Democratic Party.
  • In recent years, the Green Party has emerged, as well as a small number of minority parties. The “Anti PowerPoint Party”, for example, was a political party in Switzerland that worked to decrease the use of PowerPoint in professional presentations. They claimed that PowerPoint software was economically harmful.
  • Popular votes can be held up to four times a year. The Federal Council decides a couple of months in advance which proposals will be voted on and releases the dates of the votes even earlier. Currently all the dates have been fixed from now until 2034.

A rich backstory​

The democratic roots of Switzerland travel in many directions and cross several centuries. During the Renaissance, humanists striving for freedom from Rome offered different interpretations to religion that were closer to the needs of people and political independence.
you can read more about it here...

 

stephenkatsea

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More than its snow-capped mountains and nifty, collapsible army knives, Switzerland is perhaps best known for its system of democracy. Known as "direct" democracy, it’s a legal framework that enables all Swiss citizens over the age of 18 to vote on how the country is run.
The system has some high-powered admirers. France’s newly elected President Emmanuel Macron has said he wants a similar system of referendums in place for French voters. But it can also produce unexpected results, such as a veto on the building of minarets or a proposal for all cars to be banned from the roads on Sundays.
Here are a few other facts about Switzerland’s political system:
  • Switzerland has a population of 8.2 million people, of which 24% are foreign nationals, spread across 26 cantons.
  • The fundamental principle of direct democracy is that all citizens take part in decision-making and there’s a strong respect for minorities. Unfortunately, this wasn’t extended to women, who were not given the vote until 1971 (and even until 1991 in the case of one canton).
  • In the canton of Appenzell Innerrhoden, the People’s Assembly (Landsgemeinde) still chooses its representative in the Council of States by a show of hands.
  • The government, also called Federal Council, is the executive power. It is composed of seven Federal Councillors from several Swiss political parties, which are elected by the Federal Assembly every four years and share the duties of a head of state. Federal Councillors rotate and every year one takes on the role of president.
  • The Swiss political scene is dominated by four main parties: the Swiss People’s Party, the Social Democrats, the Liberals and the Christian Democratic Party.
  • In recent years, the Green Party has emerged, as well as a small number of minority parties. The “Anti PowerPoint Party”, for example, was a political party in Switzerland that worked to decrease the use of PowerPoint in professional presentations. They claimed that PowerPoint software was economically harmful.
  • Popular votes can be held up to four times a year. The Federal Council decides a couple of months in advance which proposals will be voted on and releases the dates of the votes even earlier. Currently all the dates have been fixed from now until 2034.

A rich backstory​

The democratic roots of Switzerland travel in many directions and cross several centuries. During the Renaissance, humanists striving for freedom from Rome offered different interpretations to religion that were closer to the needs of people and political independence.
Our grandson and his goat friend, recently verifying the Materhorn run off will make its way to the Colorado River basin.
IMG_0305.jpg
 

DrunkenSailor

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1900 gallons of water are required to produce 1 lb of almonds. In 2020 California produced 2.8 billion lbs of almonds.

It takes 1362 gallons of water to produce a pound of pistachios. In 2020 California produced 1.05 billion pounds of pistachios.

Growing these three water intensive crops in the desert is beyond stupid it's criminal. The resniks who own the wonderful company are the largest users of water in California. Guess who they support politically. As long as they continue to have their hands in California politicians pockets nothing will change and our reservoirs will continue to be emptied.
 

Riverryder

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lol.... you must have sore fingers replying to every post...

I have calluses on my finger tips. I work with computers so im okay..

. The sun comes up every day don’t waste your life yelling at it.

What do you have for sale right now? Rzrs? Pontoons?
Did you find a 210?
Cut your beauty up?!
 

2FORCEFULL

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heres the real problem, they can't make cal conserve water.... and cal won't get rationed .... so they dump all the water out and thats how they ration cal...

Mead's water — including rationing. Ironically, the proposed rationing measures don't include California, whose water demands get first priority.
 

2FORCEFULL

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I have calluses on my finger tips. I work with computers so im okay..

. The sun comes up every day don’t waste your life yelling at it.

What do you have for sale right now? Rzrs? Pontoons?
Did you find a 210?
Cut your beauty up?!
everything is for sale....
 

2FORCEFULL

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its like whathappen to az... az agreeded to pay the water authority for storing water in mead.... when it came time to pay... az told WA to pound sand,... when az went to get there water... wa said it evaporated and there was none left...

thats when az started pumping water under ground.... but thats all going to over sea hay...
 

OC Mike

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Blame golf all you want I promise you it’s not the problem. I personally worked at a golf course in Orange County (golf course superintendent) and ALL 18 holes were watered by run off from the neighboring houses. The course collected it in a irrigation lake and pumped it out through its own pump station. I can tell you for a fact that the irrigation lake was overflowing 300 days a year!!! We didn’t fill it with any other supplemental water. That’s just one of many courses that do that by the way!


I said this in other post but the water the majority of courses use is reclaimed and if not used by courses it just gets pumped out into the ocean for you to swim in. Reclaimed plants have a surplus of waste water from all the affordable housing going in.

Was in Idaho this past weekend, looked at a newly built home.
The rep was explaining how all the irrigation is reclaimed water.
How ironic in an area with no water issues.

Not sure how to enact that in established aras but it should be instituted in new developments.
 

2FORCEFULL

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heres another thing, lake mead is 100 times better at the low level, at the high level we were loosing too much to evaporation ,,, that and areas like vegas wash and stewarts point didn't have enough current so water was getting polluted... my guess is when they get the water to the level they want mead will be more like havasu with just widened areas of the river...
 

2FORCEFULL

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Was in Idaho this past weekend, looked at a newly built home.
The rep was explaining how all the irrigation is reclaimed water.
How ironic in an area with no water issues.

Not sure how to enact that in established aras but it should be instituted in new developments.
kinda like how we use drinking water to flush toilets.... seems like we could use gray water from showers and sinks...
 

OC Mike

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May be true and there is definitely more beach area but WTF is the level?
Overton is gone, Echo probably. Currently can't launch anywhere.
 

2FORCEFULL

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everybody can believe what they want... but I believe I'll be dead and gone before I run out of water..... so how people waist it doesn't really concern me... but you youngsters .... might wanna figure this out now...
 

2FORCEFULL

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May be true and there is definitely more beach area but WTF is the level?
Overton is gone, Echo probably. Currently can't launch anywhere.
next to go is vegas wash... when I went through there last it was only about 26' deep... it got to be 4 or 5' right now???


On Wednesday, the water in Lake Mead was at 1,047.61 feet, down about 16 inches from the previous week and almost 7 feet from a month ago. It is projected to drop another 30 feet in the next two years, according to the Bureau of Reclamation.

The lower water level is causing new shorelines to be exposed, creating more risks and difficulties for visitors to Lake Mead National Recreation Area.


16507332_web1_lakemead2-1200x800-2.jpg
 

2FORCEFULL

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I have calluses on my finger tips. I work with computers so im okay..

. The sun comes up every day don’t waste your life yelling at it.

What do you have for sale right now? Rzrs? Pontoons?
Did you find a 210?
Cut your beauty up?!
I have this boat for sale... ran great last time out.... needs trailer...

16595061_web1_copy_LAKE-MEAD-VISUALS-JUN15-22-001.jpg
 

2FORCEFULL

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Water authority spokesman Bronson Mack said engineers believe the pumping station would be able to pump water until the lake drops to 875 feet, where the pump sits. Southern Nevada depends on Lake Mead for 90 percent of its water.

Under the 1922 Colorado River Compact, by which the water is divided, California gets 4.4 million acre-feet of water per year. Arizona’s allotment is 2.8 million acre-feet, and Nevada normally gets 300,000 acre-feet. The Las Vegas Valley consumed roughly 242,000 acre-feet of water last year, according to the authority. That’s more than 80,000 acre-feet, or about 27 billion gallons, less than the valley consumed in 2002 when there were 800,000 fewer residents.
 

2FORCEFULL

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LOL.... WA said then have been planning for the lake to drop 150' for 20 years.... ahhhhh... no shit!!!!

“We have been planning for this and preparing for this potential for more than two decades,” said Bronson Mack, spokesman for the Southern Nevada Water Authority. “We anticipate that Lake Mead’s water level is going to continue to decline as a result of drought and climate change conditions. But this further emphasizes the seriousness of this issue. And it does serve as a very stark reminder that we all need to conserve the water that we use outdoors.”


this is and allways has been the issue... WA wants everyone that gets water out of the river to cut back, remove lawns and such...
 

Javajoe

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1900 gallons of water are required to produce 1 lb of almonds. In 2020 California produced 2.8 billion lbs of almonds.

It takes 1362 gallons of water to produce a pound of pistachios. In 2020 California produced 1.05 billion pounds of pistachios.

Growing these three water intensive crops in the desert is beyond stupid it's criminal. The resniks who own the wonderful company are the largest users of water in California. Guess who they support politically. As long as they continue to have their hands in California politicians pockets nothing will change and our reservoirs will continue to be emptied.
I use about 19k gal a month. Everything is on drip, small grass front yard. It could be because I leave my hose on full blast running down the driveway when I go to work to piss off the Dem neighbors lol. But hey, water is cheap where I live and never restrictions
 

Nordie

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My question is, if Lake Mead ever started to fill again, would the dam now be compromised? All that pressure for all them years and now the damn might be a little laxed.

I personally don't think Vegas is the problem as we reclaim the water and send it back to mead, it's the farming below the damn that's the real problem.

I mean sure we're in a drought, there is no denying that, but to blame global warming is asinine. How long have we really tracked weather patterns? Maybe a little over 100 years.

Way before humans roamed the earth there has been ice ages, and the glaciers have continued to melt well before humans roamed the earth. There is cycles, and we know very little about it in my opinion.
 

Singleton

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My question is, if Lake Mead ever started to fill again, would the dam now be compromised? All that pressure for all them years and now the damn might be a little laxed.

I personally don't think Vegas is the problem as we reclaim the water and send it back to mead, it's the farming below the damn that's the real problem.

I mean sure we're in a drought, there is no denying that, but to blame global warming is asinine. How long have we really tracked weather patterns? Maybe a little over 100 years.

Way before humans roamed the earth there has been ice ages, and the glaciers have continued to melt well before humans roamed the earth. There is cycles, and we know very little about it in my opinion.

Residential water usage is not the problem IMO, since residential only uses apx 20% of the water. Commercial farming eats up a ton of water and very few enhancement in crop watering. Outside of fuel, my FIL’s farm second biggest expense when he was running it was water. It was crazy how much water costs in east/central New Mexico during the summer when the well went dry.

Based on the historical weather patterns, the state allocations were created during one of the wettest periods in history and no one is willing to adjust. Guaranteed water allocations are worth more then gold right now IMO. Those Middle East owned farms in AZ all have guaranteed water allocations, that will not be reduced. This is one item that needs some serious attention. IMO, water in the US should benefit US citizens before it is used and the product is shipped overseas with NO benefit to anyone in the US.
 

Runs2rch

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My question is, if Lake Mead ever started to fill again, would the dam now be compromised? All that pressure for all them years and now the damn might be a little laxed.

I personally don't think Vegas is the problem as we reclaim the water and send it back to mead, it's the farming below the damn that's the real problem.

I mean sure we're in a drought, there is no denying that, but to blame global warming is asinine. How long have we really tracked weather patterns? Maybe a little over 100 years.

Way before humans roamed the earth there has been ice ages, and the glaciers have continued to melt well before humans roamed the earth. There is cycles, and we know very little about it in my opinion.
Remember right after 9/11 when they started letting the water out? They claimed they were worried the dam could be a target of a terrorist attack.

I bet there is more to the lifespan story of the dam than anyone alive knows.
 

MohavValley

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Doing it out to create another crisis, they can "solve" (never), create new laws, agencies, and budgets that will never go away. 4-5 years ago when Orville spillway collapsed CA resivors where full, 2 years later drained out. Doing the same to the western lake resivor system.


Water has been highest I've seen in 6 years, lost another 2 feet Hill on to the beach in the last month.
 

HALLETT BOY

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My question is, if Lake Mead ever started to fill again, would the dam now be compromised? All that pressure for all them years and now the damn might be a little laxed.

I personally don't think Vegas is the problem as we reclaim the water and send it back to mead, it's the farming below the damn that's the real problem.

I mean sure we're in a drought, there is no denying that, but to blame global warming is asinine. How long have we really tracked weather patterns? Maybe a little over 100 years.

Way before humans roamed the earth there has been ice ages, and the glaciers have continued to melt well before humans roamed the earth. There is cycles, and we know very little about it in my opinion.
The average life expectancy of a concrete dam is like 100 years , Boulder dam was built in the early 30’s . I don’t know what the silt content is , maybe 20-25 % ? Anybody know the plans for Mead ? Somethings due for maintenance/ change .
 

grumpy88

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The average life expectancy of a concrete dam is like 100 years , Boulder dam was built in the early 30’s . I don’t know what the silt content is , maybe 20-25 % ? Anybody know the plans for Mead ? Somethings due for maintenance/ change .
If 100 years was the mark i would start saying good bye to havasu . Parker dam is the same time frame .
 

The Prisoner

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4Waters

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The average life expectancy of a concrete dam is like 100 years , Boulder dam was built in the early 30’s . I don’t know what the silt content is , maybe 20-25 % ? Anybody know the plans for Mead ? Somethings due for maintenance/ change .
If 100 years was the mark i would start saying good bye to havasu . Parker dam is the same time frame .
It's my understanding that concrete continues to get harder for 100 years and then it begins to get weaker, so if that's true then Boulder dam has roughly 50 years left.
 

The Prisoner

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It's my understanding that concrete continues to get harder for 100 years and then it begins to get weaker, so if that's true then Boulder dam has roughly 50 years left.
I’ll “only” be 109! 😀
if there’s no water left, maybe turn it into a giant concert amphitheater??😀 Lots of room behind that wall. Hope that bridge lasts…it’s king of creepy if you think how high it is when crossing it. Plus seeing it built from the very beginning all the work that went into that thing….seeing the trusses just floating out into the void.😲
 

bk2drvr

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The steep decline of Mead as of recent is part of the plan to prop up Powell. All the Youtube idiots that are reporting daily on the dire situation at Mead don't know the whole story or even part of it. Who cares about barrels, old sunkin boats and people backing half of their vehicles in at the launch ramp. So take what they say with grain of salt.

Its pretty simple, Powell got within 35' of minimum power pool which sent water managers into crises mode and some big changes were put in place quickly. Mead is 140' from min power pool so naturally Powell takes priority at the moment. I don't think any of us could have predicted the emergency measures that have been put in place thus far to keep those generators turning at both dams. And I truly believe we don't know what other procedures they can exercise if it continues to get worse. Watching this situation unfold closely over the past year tells me one very interesting thing, there is no f'ing way they will allow those generators to stop turning. If you wonder how low the water will eventually get at Powell and Mead, look at the min power pool elevations and go up 50' - 100' or so. It won't dip below that in our lifetime IMO.

As much as we want to criticize the people running the show here, its my belief there are some very smart people dealing with this problem right now. I could be wrong about all of this of course but I think we are going to see some major changes/decisions made in the not too distant future that keep lake levels somewhat constant.
 

4Waters

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I’ll be damned😀
Well that changes what my understanding is 🤣 my understanding maybe correct for standard pours, dam construction is anything but standard, I do know that 90-100 year old concrete streets in LA still look good as a whole as long as an outside force like tree roots do not cause damage.
 

OC Mike

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The steep decline of Mead as of recent is part of the plan to prop up Powell. All the Youtube idiots that are reporting daily on the dire situation at Mead don't know the whole story or even part of it. Who cares about barrels, old sunkin boats and people backing half of their vehicles in at the launch ramp. So take what they say with grain of salt.

Its pretty simple, Powell got within 35' of minimum power pool which sent water managers into crises mode and some big changes were put in place quickly. Mead is 140' from min power pool so naturally Powell takes priority at the moment. I don't think any of us could have predicted the emergency measures that have been put in place thus far to keep those generators turning at both dams. And I truly believe we don't know what other procedures they can exercise if it continues to get worse. Watching this situation unfold closely over the past year tells me one very interesting thing, there is no f'ing way they will allow those generators to stop turning. If you wonder how low the water will eventually get at Powell and Mead, look at the min power pool elevations and go up 50' - 100' or so. It won't dip below that in our lifetime IMO.

As much as we want to criticize the people running the show here, its my belief there are some very smart people dealing with this problem right now. I could be wrong about all of this of course but I think we are going to see some major changes/decisions made in the not too distant future that keep lake levels somewhat constant.
Yeh, I just want to launch my boat...
 

The Prisoner

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Sounds like it will out live me by a few centuries !
Yes. The immediate worry is the water…not the integrity of the dam….soon it will be just a giant wall that could be used for a cool drive in theater screen.
 

The Prisoner

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Well that changes what my understanding is 🤣 my understanding maybe correct for standard pours, dam construction is anything but standard, I do know that 90-100 year old concrete streets in LA still look good as a whole as long as an outside force like tree roots do not cause damage.
I couldn’t imagine being a worker there in the summer building that thing….that is a hell hole.
 
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