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Schiaward

Backlash

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Good morning!

More than 10,000 views on this thread?? I'm flattered and thankful for all of the support and interest. Thank you!

I guess I have to provide you guys with at least one picture or some type of an update! :D

Give me a little time and I will upload a few recent pictures for your enjoyment.

Thanks again!

Henry
 

Backlash

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Here are a few pictures of some progress.

While progress on the hull itself has been slow, I have managed to get a few other things accomplished.

Needless to say, Joe has been quite busy putting on a shine......:D



Schiaward Outboard Engine Bracket Stainless Hardware (Polished).jpg



Schiaward Stainless Hardware (Polished).jpg



Schiaward Pedals (Polished).jpg



Schiward Outboard Bracket Picture (Polished).jpg



Schiaward Outboard Bracket Assembled after Polishing.jpg


There is more to come as additional pieces are revived and additional progress is made.

Thank you for following along and enjoy your evening!

Henry
 

Backlash

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Good morning Folks,

Here are a few pictures and a little bit of an update. Since I only had a day and a half off from work, I wasn't able to get as much accomplished as I would have liked.

I did pick up the fuel tank from Joe who performed his typical magic......... :D


Schiaward Fuel Tank Polished.jpg


I wasnt about to reinstall the old sender unit so a new one was ordered and installed.


Schiaward Fuel Tank Sender Unit Replacement.jpg



Schiaward Fuel Tank Sender Unit Install.jpg


Not much else to share regarding progress but as always, thank you for checking in and for following along!

Henry
 

Backlash

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Good afternoon!

Unfortunately I have been busy with other projects and have not been able to spend too much time on the Schiaward. I did manage to wrap up the tank and I am VERY happy with the results.

Just waiting to finish up the tank cradle and the hold-down brackets for the fuel tank.

I was able to finally sever the cord (Steering and throttle cables), and moved the engine to a semi-permanent stand. Where I had it sitting, it was constantly in the way of the transom and we were tripping over the engine hoist just to get around the transom.

Progress has been slow with regards to fiberglass but the replacement wood bulkhead panels have been cut and fit. I want to wait for everything to be cut out and ground before starting to glass things back in.

Anyways, here is a quick picture of the completed tank........



Schiaward Fuel Tank Assembly Completed.jpg



If things start to slow down on the other projects, I may get more time to devote to this one (Not likely!) :D

Thank you for following along!

Henry
 

Backlash

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Good afternoon!

I had a moderately productive day working on the Schiaward. I wasn't able to make as much progress as I would have liked but that's always the case.

I started grinding on the remaining wood and fiberglass on the inside of the transom and burned up my favorite 10 year old DeWalt grinder. :grumble:

Off to the local hardware store for a new one!

I finished getting all of the remaining wood off the inside of the transom and ground down all of the remaining fiberglass "Chunks." I still need to remove one of the outboard stringers and three small bulkheads that are rotted on the bottom edge. Once those are removed, I will just need to clean up around the ends of the stringers and feather out the stringers and the interiors of the gunnels and the floor for the new glass. It sounds easier than it is. :D

I managed to stop by a friend's shop where he was finishing up my tank cradle. It looks great and fits the tank perfectly! It will look even better after Joe finishes with it this week.

Here are a few pictures to show you the progress.


R.I.P. ol' girl, it was a good run! :D

Schiaward (Grinder, RIP).jpg



Interior view of the transom and the ends of the stringers. There is a little more work to do to clean up the ends of the stringers and the hull bottom where the transom meets the hull. The remaining wood looks damp and there is water in the bottom of the boat because I had just cleaned up all of the dust and debris and hosed the boat out.

Schiaward Transom View.jpg



Schiaward Transom View 2.jpg



Jan and his magic wand getting down to business.

Schiaward Tank Cradle.jpg

As always, thank you for following along!

Oh yeah, check back later next week and let's hope I can show you a cool little detail that I'm working on..... :D

Henry
 

Backlash

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Good morning Folks!

OK. So, it is safe to say that this has been somewhat of a "Budget" restoration/rejuvination. My intent has been to find items at a low cost and then spend my free time and energy bringing these items back to their former glory or just give them to the professionals to make them look better than I possibly could. In keeping with that theme, majority of my searches and shopping for parts has been via "CL" and "Ebay." So far, I've been fairly lucky.

Early on in this project, I vowed to find a set of Howard emblems for this boat. I even went down to Valencia and bugged Gene who dug through some of his desk drawers in search of some old Howard emblems.

No such luck. Then I though I would request the help of some of the "OG's" or "Veteranos" on this site hoping to stir up a set. Nope, still no such luck.

Until this past week. :D

Thank you "CL!"

I contacted the owner who had several items advertised on "CL." I explained my situation to him and told him I was interested in the name plates. After a short discussion, Adam and I agreed upon a price. Being who I am, I didn't want to "Jump the gun" or tell you guys about the logos until I had them in my little paws. Not that I've had bad experiences dealing with people from "CL," but we all know.....

Adam is a man of his word and he did exactly what he said he would do. He was cordial and communicated with me even after all of my annoying questions and requests for pictures.

I picked these up from him on Monday and I couldn't be happier! Thanks Adam!


Schiaward Howard Logos.jpg


These too will find themselves getting shined up. ;)



I also received another small package in the mail.

I've been shopping around for a new steering column for some time but I couldn't really find anything that I liked. I wanted something a little bit different and something that you don't see on every single other boat. I like the one's offered by Dana Marine and Eddie Marine but it seems a lot of people already have those. This is what I stumbled upon and I couldn't pass up the deal. Now to make it work and shine like new!


Schiaward New-Used Steering Column.jpg



Schiaward Steering Column 2.jpg



Schiaward Steering Column 3.jpg


Thank you for following along and have a great day!

Henry
 

Backlash

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Good afternoon Folks!

Not a lot of progress to share but every little bit helps!

I got the "New" E-bay steering column disassembled and I am impressed with the way this was assembled. I am not sure of its origins but someone put quite a bit of time into thinking this one out and fabricating all of the parts. The steering shaft itself was held inside the column with a pair of large ball bearings (One at the top near the wheel, the second down near the bottom by the dash). The shaft itself has several different layers machined in it including a slot for a key to "Lock" in the hub. I am really happy with this part of the project and feel as though I scored a pretty good deal.

Here are some pictures of the column and the disassembly process.....


Schiaward Steering Column Disassembly.jpg



Schiaward Steering Column Disassembly 3.jpg




As you can tell in the photographs, all of the components are in need of cleaning and replacement. There was enough grease inside the column to prevent the bearing from seizing up and the rust on the steering shaft was kept to a minimum.

Since it was time to pick up the fuel tank cradle from Joe, I figured I might as well drop this column and hub off for some love.

Here is a picture of the column and hub before........


Schiaward Steering Column and Hub Before Polishing.jpg



And here they are eight minutes later..........


Schiaward Steering Column and Hub After Polishing.jpg



Not too shabby! :D

I picked up the fuel tank cradle which turned out BEAUTIFUL!!! Here is a quick teaser pick even though it's all wrapped up........


Schiaward Fuel Tank Cradle After Polishing.jpg



I came to work today and accidentally dropped the steering shaft into the media blasting cabinet. After a few moments, it fell back out looking like this. It too turned out great and will be reassembled once I get a new set of bearings next week.


Schiaward Steering Column Shaft After Media Blasting and Wire Wheel.jpg


Thanks again for following along and for checking in!

Henry
 

Backlash

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Hello Folks!

Not much to report with this project. After a fantastic weekend at the river, I've had to get caught up at work and of course the home projects continue to pile up. I got sidetracked with a ton of other little things but hopefully things will get rolling again in the next week or two.

I did manage to get the steering column reassembled with all new bearings and retainer clips and it turned out great. I am stoked with how well it turned out and how smooth everything is. I didn't splurge on bearings but I don't think I will notice the difference between the stainless bearings and races and the chromoly bearings I used. The price difference was substantial hence the use of the chromoly.



Schiaward Steering Column Bearings.jpg



Schiaward Steering Column Bearings Installed.jpg



I also scrubbed down the Howard emblems that I purchased and they look pretty good. I considered having the emblems re-chromed but I think I can do a little more cleaning and they should look fine.



Howard Emblems (First cleaning).jpg



Other than that, not much else was accomplished on this project.

Thank you for checking in and enjoy the day!

Henry
 

Backlash

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Good afternoon!

I was finally able to get "Back in the saddle" and get some work done on this project.

As I have already removed majority of the transom coring, it was time to clean up the rest of the transom and begin removing the rest of the rotted wood in other parts of the hull.

I spent the day grinding out as much fiberglass as I could and smoothed out any areas near and on the transom that I could reach. I still need to clean up the corners and the top of the transom where holes were drilled for rigging and a ski pylon, but that will happen in the next week or two.

Here are a few pictures of the progress.....



Schiaward Transom and Stringers (Coring removed, grinding almost completed).jpg


In this picture above, you can see the ends of the stringers where they attach to the transom. I have cleaned up the tops of the stringers and have ground everything smooth with a 60 grit flap wheel in preparation of new glass. The ends of the stringers seem to be dry and free of any rot as they were "Capped" on the ends with fiberglass. A nice touch.



Schiaward Gunnel Supports (Rotted and Poorly Installed Pair).jpg


This picture shows two gunnel supports on the port side. The support on the right side is the original but is visibly rotted along the bottom edge. One of the previous owners simply installed a second support that was not installed correctly (The glass was not ground prior to laying new glass; and there was no chemical bond.)



Schiaward Gunnel Supports (Pair, Close-up).jpg


Here is a close up of the port gunnel supports. Notice the cloth at the bottom of the support how it looks to be "Lifted."



Schiaward Gunnel Support (Fiberglass was not bonded to hull bottom and could be lifted).jpg


I could easily pull this glass apart by hand and simply pulled the gunnel support out from the hull.



Schiaward Gunnel Support Removed (Old cloth was dry and lacked resin).jpg


This is the dry cloth that was used to install the above gunnel support. It too pulled out by hand and was mostly dry and free of resin.



Schiaward Gunnel Support Removed and Fiberglass Ground Smooth (Starboard).jpg


This is how both sides of the hull look today with all of the gunnel supports removed. All of the areas were ground flush with a 60 grit flap wheel in preparation for the installation of new supports. You have to LOVE grinding fiberglass upside down! This is a GREAT picture showing the quality of the hull and deck "Cap" job that was completed. I believe this hull was capped when the hull was initially laid up because of how well the glasswork was completed. This is just a hunch though...



Schiaward Evidence of a Successful Day.jpg


Evidence of a productive day on the Schiaward! :D


Needless to say, I am happy with the progress I made. I burned through several discs just trying to get all of the surfaces prepped but it was well worth it.

The transom is almost completely clean and ready for glass and coring material.

The tops and sides of the stringers near the transom are ground in preparation of stringer knees and additional glass.

The gunnels are free from any supports and there is only a small amount of prep left before the new gunnel supports can be glassed in.

I stay motivated by telling myself the more time I spend prepping all of the surfaces NOW, the easier things will be when it comes time to lay new glass. :)

Thank you for taking the time to read through this post and as always, please feel free to ask questions or provide suggestions and/or feedback.

Enjoy your day!

Henry
 

Wheeler

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I can say this for you, you're dedicated!

Keep up the good work. :thumbsup:thumbsup
 

Backlash

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Thank you Wheeler!

I have to admit, you play a role in that motivation!

I look forward to the day I log in to RDP and see a picture of this boat, my beautiful girlfriend and I cruising down the Parker Strip captured by someone hiding out on the Arizona shore wielding a telephoto lens! :D

Thank you for the positive reinforcement Sir!

Henry
 

Backlash

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Good afternoon,

Not a lot to show for progress on this old girl. But, ANY progress is progress nonetheless! :D

My time has been limited so the little time I had was spent popping the old turning fin out of the hull. If nothing else, it aids in draining the rain water! (I have some ideas so be patient with this part of the project!).

Anyhow, nothing other than some fin pictures and some views of one UGLY ASS HULL bottom!!! (Djunkie, this $#!] makes your sled look amazing!) Enjoy!



View of the turning fin below the hull bottom....



Schiaward Turning Fin Bottom of Hull.jpg



View of the backing plate inside the hull bottom....



Schiaward Turning Fin Backing Plate.jpg




Schiaward Turning Fin Backing Plate Inside Hull.jpg



Fiberglass resin scraped away and the backing plates and bolts were removed....



Schiaward Turning Fin Backing Plate and Bolts Removed.jpg



Broke the "Seal" of the white shower caulking and the fin popped right off! The wood you see on the bottom of the boat was pretty damp....maybe it needs more caulking! :D



Schiaward Turning Fin Pulled from Bottom of Hull.jpg



Schiaward Turning Fin - Profile View.jpg



Schiaward Turning Fin - Front View.jpg



As you can tell, there is still a LONG ways to go to get this hull back to where it needs to be. As always, thank you for following along and thank you for checking in on us!

Have a great afternoon and stay safe!

Henry
 

RiverDave

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Henry, I am interested in learning more about how that Steering column goes together..

Also interested in your polishers phone #! He looks like he does great work!

How are you planning on keeping the polished parts / polished?

RD
 

Backlash

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RD thank you for checking in on me.

The column is actually pretty simple. Just a center shaft supported on both ends of the column with a bearing/race and c-clips. The column was machined on the inside so the races would only slide inward the thickness of the race (.75" or so). Slide one set of races into the column, then slide the second end of races over the opposite end of the shaft. Then on each end of the shaft inside the column are the c-clips. This prevents the shaft from sliding in or out. I hope that makes sense...

In order for the polished parts to actually get dirty or spotted, they would actually have to get used! At the rate I'm going, she wont see water for another two years! :D All parts are safely out of the elements until then. Once this sucker actually hits the water and gets a water spot or two, I will change my screen name to "PolishingMoFo#2."

Then I will have to take the entire boat BACK apart and send everything out to be polished again or just have it anodized. It's a terrible cycle! :D

Good luck on the Soprano-esque Go-Pro camera retreival dealio! :D

Henry
 

ka0tyk

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im interested in seeing how you're gonna snake your transom wood in behind those stringers with the top cap still on the boat. it was not one of the funner moments with my boat. great progress so far. i never in a million years thought of polishing my nuts and bolts. haha you're crazy.
 

Backlash

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Good morning! Thanks for the kind words. Ka0tyk, I highly recommend you have your nuts and bolt polished! :) It's a good thing!

All kidding aside, I am the type of person who tries to do things to the best of my ability. And I have always tried to do things the best way I know how. I figure "Well, since this is a brand new piece or part, why not make it look nice and purdy so the finished product will show the attention to detail." That's my goal anyhow. I know this is not a brand new 21RC or a 46' Skater. I'm OK with that. This wont be the biggest, fastest or even the nicest boat on the water. But it is mine and I own it outright free and clear. And that is why I would like the end result to be safe and look as nice as possible.

The down side to this approach is it obviously takes me a little longer to get things accomplished. But one thing I DON'T want to do, is rush through this project and then have the end result reflect that "Hurried" approach.

Again, thanks for following along and thank you for the kind words. Take care and stay safe!

Henry
 

Rickybobby

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bl
just found your thread, very cool rebuild... i like the way your gettin it done !!!! Keep the pics coming !!!
 

Backlash

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Rickybobby,

Thank you for following along and for chiming in! I really appreciate the support.

This is one of those projects that isn't going to be finished overnight. It will take some time as I am only working on this when I have spare time. But my goal will remain the same. Do this to the best of my ability while trying to stay on somewhat of a budget and try to do a lot of the work myself if possible. Since I have other irons in the fire, I am not in a position to allocate a large sum of time and money to this particular project at this time.

I keep telling myself, "Patience gwasshoppa!" :D

Ka0tyk, the new transom core "Shouldn't" be too hard to slip in behind the ends of the stringers. Of course that will all change once I get half-covered in resin and have the stress of the clock to worry about! As you know, I'm going to remain optimistic about this part of the restoration though. Thanks for checking up on me!

Did you find your 23-24' money-pit yet??

Henry
 

Backlash

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Good afternoon!

Not much progress to share at this point. I am still fitting and cutting new ply for the bulkheads and that is a less than interesting portion of this project. I will post some pictures though to share the progress and give you an idea of what I'm doing and where this rejuvination project is going (Ever so slowly!). :)

RD and/or moderators; would you want to move the "Schiaward" project out of the Schiada section and maybe over to the "Custom Boats by RDP Members" section?? When I initially started this project, I wasn't sure whether or not it would turn out to be a Schiada. Since it isn't, well........that only seems appropriate! If you want to leave it here that works as well! :D

Thanks again for checking in and following along.

Stay safe!

Henry
 

Backlash

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Good evening Folks!

I only have a few updates with this long-term project and they aren't anything earth shattering! :D

I was able to get several new bulkheads cut out and fit for the hull.

There are new bulkheads going in between the stringers and new bulkheads going in along the sides of the hull too. I didn't take pictures of each piece but you should get the idea with the few pictures I have posted.

There are several of these little guys that I will glass up and then fit into the hull bottom between each of the stringers and between the outside stringer and hull sides.



Schiaward Mini Bulkhead for Floor (Pre router).jpg



Schiaward Mini Bulkhead for Floor (Post Router).jpg



Schiaward Mini Bulkhead for Floor (Mock-up).jpg



While this is only a picture of one small piece, I think you get the jist of it. :D

Obviously, I still need to prep the hull where each of these bulkheads will be installed to promote adhesion (Unlike the previous owner did when they replaced a bulkhead).

Hopefully I can get more pictures of more progress next week.

As always, thank you for checking in and following along!

Henry
 

Backlash

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Good afternoon!

I spent some time this week cutting and fitting more parts for this project. I managed to cut out a few more bulkheads for the hull sides along with the new transom knees that will be glassed and installed.

Instead of me talking so much, how about I just put up some pictures! :D



Schiaward Transom Knee Mock-up.jpg



Schiaward Transom Knees Prior to Cutting.jpg



Schiaward Transom Knee (Starboard).jpg


In the above picture, there is a dark spot at the bottom of the transom near the stringer. This is not rot or anything else. It is a small piece of wood left from removing the old transom core. If you check the last picture, you can see what I did to remove all traces of old wood from the transom. ;)



Schiaward Transom Knee (Starboard 2).jpg


The two individual layers of plywood will receive a layer of glass between the panels along with a few layers on the outsides. Once the knees are cured I will then seat them on top of the stringers and bond them in at that time.



Schiaward Transom Knees Mock-up.jpg


Yes, there will be a LOT more grinding and prep inside this hull before any new glass goes down. I am happy with the way these transom knees turned out.



Schiaward Stringer and Transom Clean-up with Rotozip.jpg


I used a "Rotozip" type tool to get in behind the ends of the stringers to clean up these areas. It definitely made short work of the mess at the ends of the stringers. The glass is all wood-free now and is one step closer to receiving some new skin.

As usual, not much to share but any progress whatsoever is progress! :D

Take care and thank you for checking in!

Henry
 

Backlash

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Good evening!

Just a small update to share. I'm still cutting, fitting and shaping plywood for various sections of the hull.

I also began assembling the blocks on the tops of some of the bulkheads to help support the proposed flooring. Each of the smaller bulkheads I am installing in between the stringers will be glassed in (Front and backside of each component), as will the bulkheads separating the bilge area from the ski locker area. The purposes for adding these bulkheads is to separate the compartments in the hull while providing support for the flooring between the front and rear seat. While these pictures don't show this idea, it does show how I've assembled the bulkheads and blocks.




Schiaward Bulkhead Countersinking Screws.jpg

This picture just shows the countersinking bit used to get the screws (Yes, screws coated for exterior use even though they will be sealed and covered with glass), sunk below the surface.




Schiaward Rear Bulkhead flooring block mock-up.jpg

Block placed on the "Inside" of the bulkhead so it wont be visible once the floor is installed. Unless you can fit your head inside the "Ski locker...."




Schiaward Mini Bulkhead for Flooring with Block Affixed.jpg

A picture of the one of the smaller "Mini" bulkheads. Here you can see the water-resistant construction adhesive oozing out of the crack between the block and the plywood bulkhead. I repeated this process for each of the bulkheads for this boat.




Schiaward Rear Bulkhead with flooring block.jpg

This picture shows the bulkhead that will fit between the bilge area and the ski locker.




Schiaward Rear Bulkhead with flooring block attached.jpg

This picture shows the above bulkhead propped up in the hull.



Yes, there is a lot more to do before any of these bulkheads are installed. Each of these bulkheads fits loosely and will not have a tight fit once each is glassed. When they are installed, they will not be putting pressure downward or outwards towards the hull sides or the stringers. Each of the bulkheads will be "Floating" and will be supported by glass once installed.

UPS just delivered some resin. :D

Now I am just waiting on some cloth to show up. Once that happens, it may be time to get sticky.

Thanks again for following along!!

Henry
 

FrznJim

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Interesting thread. Just a comment, make sure you rough up the existing glass, by sanding where you want the new cloth/resin to bond to the old. Learned that the hard way...

Also, noted that you have routed the edges of all the new components. Are you filling the void with something like 3M 5200 to fill the void and radius the filler? Just curious.
 

Backlash

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FrznJim, thank you for the questions and comments I really appreciate it. Yes, all areas of this hull will be roughed up with 40 grit prior to any resin or glass going down. You are absolutely correct; if it isn't roughed up there won't be any "Tooth" for the new resin and glass to adhere to. Thank you for pointing this out. As far as filling the voids, I will not be using any 5200. Each corner on the individual components will receive an epoxy filet. Once the filets are cured, I will begin a round of sanding to make sure each one to make certain there is a good bond with the following layers of glass. As you know, glass doesn't like sharp corners.

Once all the individual components are glassed, I will insert them in the hull. Again, epoxy filet each part and make certain there are no voids and everything is as it should be. Once the new filets cure, each one will be sanded and then glassed over. Again, no sharp corners or edges. Thanks again for the questions, I hope I answered them in a way that made sense.

Henry
 

Backlash

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Good Afternoon,

I spent some time this week completely removing everything from the Schiaward. I pulled out the helm and remaining steering cables along with the shifter and throttle cables. Took some more measurements for new bulkhead pieces and tried to clean things up before the next step in this process.



Schiaward Completely Gutted.jpg


This is the way the hull looked after cleaning all of the last few bits and pieces out. If you want to call it a blank canvas, that's fine. But it is a ROUGH blank canvas! :D



Schiaward (Bottom of Port Side Dashboard and Deck Support).jpg



Schiaward (Bottom of Starboard side of Dashboard and Deck Support).jpg


The above two pictures show how the underneath portion of the dash looks. There is a decent amount of support on the bottom side of the deck but there is still some flexing in the dashboard itself. I will later address this as I want this area to be strengthened.



Schiaward (View Underneath Deck).jpg



Schiaward Bow Area (Starboard Side Deck Support Brace).jpg



Schiaward Bow Area (Port Side Deck Support Brace).jpg


The above three pictures show the inside of the bow area and the way the deck was supported. You can also see the fiberglass tape used to finish off the inside of the cap. While it looks to be light showing through or the area seems "Thin," this must be an illusion from the flash on the camera. The cap joint on this hull is solid and the color on the outside is dark blue. I thought it interesting that the deck and hull were supported by a strip that is bolted to each half. Notice the rust from the bottom fastener. One thing I DO like is the amount of support that was glassed into this hull where the bow eye is bolted. ;)



Schiaward Footboard Port Side.jpg



Schiaward View Beneath Dash.jpg


The above two pictures are obvious but what you may not be able to see is the way the fiberglass has pulled away from the plywood. If you look closely in the corners, you can see the shadows....



Schiaward Gear Shift Lever and Throttle Cable.jpg



Schiaward Gear Shift Lever (Right side).jpg


The above two pictures show the shift lever and the throttle cable as it is routed through the stringer. The right side of the stringer where the shift lever is located needs some attention. The glass has pulled from the side of the stringer and there is about 1/4-1/2" of space between the stringer itself and the fiberglass. The wood is exposed but there doesn't appear to be any significant water damage to the stringer core.





And then.......... I moved to the bottom.

Yes, there has been some discussion of this earlier in this (And maybe other threads). Here is my opinion of this "Technique" and maybe the thought process behind it.....

Take your speedy race boat with a rounded keel out to the river or lake for the new season. Run the boat hard and feel what seems to be "Chine-walking."

To eliminate some of the chine-walking that is synonymous with a speedy boat and a rounded keel, lets make the rounded keel "Flat."



"Great idea! How do we do that?"

"I don't know Homer......"

"Well, I've got some plywood leftover from building the shed out back! And I have some leftover Bondo from when I fixed your 1976 El Camino fender....."

"Great idea Homer lets slap the wood on the bottom, Bondo it to make it smooth and water tight, and then we can put a layer of glass over the whole bottom to make it stronger!"

"We can paint the bottom black so the race inspectors dont notice the addition.......and run it!"



Well, in theory that may have worked back in the day and was probably more common than not. I'm not going to knock this theory or the way this creativity may have worked back in the day......


But I AM going to say this........


This particular install was less than stellar. There is a layer of fiberglass on the bottom of the plywood crap but it is thin at best. The sides of the plywood "Pad" aren't covered in ANYTHING and therefor, all of the wood was exposed. Guess what? Wood absorbs water and that is exactly what we have here. A rotted, water-logged keel that is covered by a half inch of Bondo with a layer of thin glass holding everything on to the bottom of the hull.

Essentially, it is chipping off in pieces but isn't hard to remove AT ALL! I'm honestly surprised it hasn't come off sooner.......



Schiaward Keel (Bottom right).jpg



Schiaward Keel Build-up Removal.jpg



Schiaward Keel Build-up (Note thickness of Bondo).jpg



Schiaward Keel Build-up (Plywood, Bondo and Glass).jpg



Schiaward Beginning of the Keel Pile.jpg


There you have it. The start of the next part of this project. The small pile of rubble you see above is what I created by removing a 12" wide section of plywood approximately 8" long. Not even one square foot. And this small pile of trash weighed 7 pounds. Yes, I weighed it in a bag on the bathroom scale! :D

If the plywood pad is 12" wide and extends forward approximately 11' from the transom, you can do the math. There is probably about 100 pounds of crap stuck on the bottom of the keel of the Schiaward.

:D

And, while this may have been "The Shit!" back in the day, it isn't staying on here.

I know Froggy, I know. I know there MAY be a reason it was put on here. I'm sure it was put on to "Fix a problem." Or, it was put on here because that's what someone's friend's Uncle's brother did with his boat "And it worked."

No, I am not going to flip the hull and lay some glass on here to make a mold of this pad. I am simply going to take it all off. It looks like ass and it bugs me. :D

As always, thank you for checking in!

Stay safe!

Henry
 

alohajeff

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Yep, that's a soup to nuts project right there. I itch just thinking about all of that glass work to be done.

Aloha
 

Backlash

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Making a hames of it!

:D

"It has to get worse before it can get any better...."
 

Backlash

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Good morning Folks!

Not a lot to share but we got the hull lifted off the bunks of the "Trailer" and supported on some 4x6's. More on this later. :D

I wanted to post some more pictures of the crap on the bottom of this hull just so you can see what we are dealing with.



Schiaward Hull Blocked up on Trailer.jpg


This picture above shows the bottom of the transom and the hull blocked up on the rusted-out and bent P.O.S. trailer. And I am using the word "Trailer" very loosely here. You can see where I've started to remove the plywood from the keel and how the original curved hull bottom is starting to show. There is still a lot of build-up on the hull bottom that needs to be removed and this hull bottom needs to be massaged and cleaned up.



Schiaward Close-up View of Plywood on Keel.jpg


This picture above shows the bottom of the hull with the plywood running surface. In this image you can see the exposed edge of the plywood pieces. While there is a thin layer of fiberglass over some of the plywood, enough of it is/was exposed to the elements to allow water intrusion. No bueno.



Schiaward Side View of Plywood Pad on Keel.jpg


Above is another picture of the hull bottom. In this image you can also see damage to the hull from either debris in the water or being drug up and down this amazing trailer. :D



Schiaward Close-up View of Plywood on Keel (Note the layer of Bondo between the ply too).jpg


This image above shows some of the plywood that I have removed. There are two layers of 3/4" plywood. The first layer closest to the hull is bonded to the bottom with some unknown substance. There is a LARGE amount of resin along the edge of the first layer of plywood. On top of the first layer of plywood is a thin layer of fiberglass and a layer of bondo filler. Then the second layer of plywood is affixed to the first layer of plywood. Again, this layer is covered in some places with a thin layer of fiberglass cloth followed by more bondo. There are places where the bondo is almost 1/2" thick.


Like I said, not a lot of progress to share but I'm trying to continue to move forward even if I only have an hour or two to work on this thing.

I've got several more parts to cut out and fit inside the hull before we move on to the next part of this process. I received some more epoxy this week so I will start adding the filets to the pieces we have already cut and fit and post those pictures later on.

As always, thank you for following along! Have a great Halloween and stay safe!

Henry
 

alohajeff

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Henry,

This refurb really has me fascinated... I can't believe somebody did what they did but good on you for cleaning this boat up and getting her back together. That plywood bottom deal is about as ugly as I've seen on these boards. You should win some sort of award for ugliest Schiada bottom ever.

Aloha
 

Backlash

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Hahahaa! If this thing were to ever win ANY award, that may be the most appropriate! ;)

It's a toss up though; ugliest bottom or ugliest "Trailer?" Sounds like two trophies to me! :D

This hull has fascinated me since day one. For whatever reason, I am really intrigued by it and the fuzzy history that goes along with this boat. I would love to chit chat with the original builder just to see what he says.

Regardless, I have a million ideas bouncing around in my head and if I can make some of them come to life, the end result should be quite nice. That's the plan anyways! :D

Thanks for following along and have a great day!

Henry
 

Backlash

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Good morning Folks!

It has been some time since I have posted any updates with this project. Week-long trip to Key West, the Christmas vacations, work schedule with overtime shifts, kids, house projects, yada yada yada. It's been a busy month and a half! :D

So, quite a bit has been accomplished while at the same time, I haven't finished much of anything!

I still need to replace the stringers and finish getting the transom in. Once those steps are completed, we'll flip the hull over and finish removing the custom keel and straighten out the bottom. Too much work to do and not enough time in the day!

So, to keep some forward progress on this hull, I've started to work on the little pieces that will eventually be installed in the hull.

What I'm doing is what most would call "Overkill" or "Unnecessary." That's good, that is what I am after.

I'm only going to do this once and I am going to do it to the best of my abilities.

I finally picked up some vinylester resin and MEKP along with some various cloth from a local SoCal manufacturer. Their products aren't the least expensive but the quality is great. And I like the fact the money is spent locally.

The pieces I am working on are the small bulkheads that I will be installing in between the stringers. These mini bulkheads will be serving two purposes. One purpose is to help stiffen things up and help "Lock in" the new stringers. The second purpose is to give me something to attach the new floor to.



I've laid out the approximate locations of these mini bulkheads along with the new deck supports along the gunnels. These are not in the EXACT positions where they will be glassed in, but they are close.

Schiaward Proposed Bulkhead and Floor Support Layout.jpg




Here is a picture of some of the items used during this portion of this experiment. :D

Schiaward Vinylester Resin, MEKP and Silica for Fillet.jpg



The picture below is of the four small parts that the fillets will be applied to. These are just being sanded to roughen up the surface to promote a solid bond.

Schiaward Mini-bulkheads After Sanding Before Fillet Application.jpg



Since I didn't want to cover everything with the putty, I masked off the areas to keep them clean.

Schiaward Mini-bulkheads Taped.jpg



This picture shows the fillet material and the consistency I attained using the silica. If you have never mixed resin and MEKP (Or other additives), make sure you mix your resin with the thickening ingredients BEFORE you add any hardener. Mixing everything to the consistency you need FIRST will save you from ruining things and getting frustrated when your mix kicks off in the mixing pot. If you notice the slight discoloration of this mixture, it is because I used a handy McDonald's spoon to mix things up with. I didn't have any stir sticks handy so I had to use the spoon instead. Hahahaa! Sucker was melting while I was stirring everything up! :D

Schiaward Fillet Putty Mixed.jpg



After spooning the putty into the crack, I tilted each of the parts up slightly so the resin would "Sit" where it was applied and wouldn't run or creep out of the gap. Once I spooned the approximate amount of putty into the corner, I used the back side of the spoon to "Push" the putty into the crack and to give the putty a curve or a radius. I tried to take a picture of the shape of the putty but I couldn't get the image I wanted to share with you guys.

Schiaward Mini-bulkhead with Fillet Applied.jpg



I peeled the tape off of each part as the resin began to cure. It was still soft enough to leave a clean edge but hard enough that it didn't run or drip.

Schiaward Mini-bulkhead Fillet after Tape Removed.jpg



Once the resin had started to cure, I began sanding the fillet and blended it into the two surfaces. This will make a smooth transition for the cloth once I begin to glass these individual pieces. I used the end of the 3/8" extension to get the fillet sanded to the same shape on each piece.

Schiaward Mini-bulkhead with Fillet being sanded.jpg



This last picture shows the pieces sanded and ready for the next step in this process. I'm very happy with how these turned out and I'm happy with the way the products performed. These pieces will be set aside so the putty can completely cure and I will continue this same process for several other pieces.

Schiaward Mini-bulkheads After Fillet and Sanding.jpg



While the steps above are common in the boating community, they are steps that are not always taken when boats are built. The process is a little time consuming but not difficult to perform. Many manufacturers are more interested in the $$$ and are not always willing to pay someone to complete these types of small details. These are things that will most likely never be seen, but like I said, this is my boat and I want to restore it my way. :D

Thank you for following along and for checking in. Take care and enjoy the upcoming weekend!

Henry

P.S. I may soon have some news regarding the origins of this Howard/Schiada...... I will share the details with you as soon as I find out. :D
 

Backlash

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Good evening!

Today wasn't the best day to do fiberglass work here in SoCal; but I still managed to make a little progress on some of the small pieces. Even with the rain keeping things damp and the increased humidity playing with my mix, I was able to get some more fillets laid out. I won't bore you with too many pictures, but the process for today was the same as the process shown above. Each piece was taped off to help keep excess resin from making a mess and fillets were applied in majority if the corners. I don't have any "After" pictures as it got too dark. I'll post some more pictures tomorrow once I get all the fillets sanded down.

20150111_163947.jpg


As always, thanks for following along! :D

Henry
 

Backlash

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Good evening folks! Just wanted to share a few pictures if the progress I made yesterday. It helps having some daylight to actually see what I accomplished.

(For some reason, I can't upload multiple images from my phone so I will add a few individually.)

This image below shows one of the longer fillets applied on one of the center bulkheads. I hadn't sanded this smooth prior to taking this picture.


20150112_080652.jpg
 

Backlash

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This image shows a pair of the small bulkheads that will be set in between the stringers. The fillets have been applied to all of the corners and all that's left to do, is fill the small holes where the screws secure the individual block.

20150112_163315.jpg
 

Backlash

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This image gives you an idea of the radius of the fillet. Adding a fillet in corners like this not only helps to strengthen the individual joint, it also helps the fiberglass cloth make a smooth transition from horizontal to vertical plane.

20150112_163347.jpg



While this progress isn't dramatic, these fun little details take some extra time. Hopefully these small details will make the end result that much better. Thanks again for following along!

Henry
 

ka0tyk

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How are you putting the floor in? That's a lot of surface area. I bedded the floor to the tops of the stringers and a sheet of glass over the top and up the sides of the hull A few inches. . I used six10 epoxy for mine and you could've probably picked up the boat by the floor.

Where are you getting your supplies from in SoCal? Ontario? I need some epoxy and biax.
 

Backlash

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Ka0tyk,

Thank you for the inquiry I appreciate it. Let me see if I can answer the questions you posed.....

First off, I have been acquiring some of my materials from "Revchem." Their corporate offices are located in Bloomington, CA (Near San Bernardino, CA), yet they have several retail locations in Southern California. One location in Costa Mesa and another in the San Fernando Valley. If you need anything at all, give them a call at (909)877-8477. Ask for Betty in Customer Service/Sales and she can help you with whatever you need. They are a large corporation and manufacture and distribute all along the west coast, so they sometimes get a little busy. But leave a message with her and she will give you a call back. I've been ordering at the corporate office and picking things up at the San Fernando retail location. Bloomington has a "Will-call" but the other location is just as close for me.

As far as the square footage of the flooring I plan to install, it will be approximately 36 sq/ft. I'm not going to be installing the floor the full length of the hull bottom. I am leaving the stringers exposed from the front seats forward to the kickboard and from behind the rear seat to the transom. If I can remember, it's approximately 6' or so....

I will be installing the floor similar to how you installed yours. ;)



These past few days were productive, although it seems I'm heading in the opposite direction. :D

The port outer stringer has been of concern since the early stages of this project. I knew it needed to be replaced at some point.... So, out came the grinder and cut-off wheel.



In the picture below, you can see a light color in the glass where the sides of the stringer meet the hull of the boat. Not the section where I stopped grinding....a little further forward (Just above the "RiverDave'sPlace.com" watermark in the picture). This stringer was able to be moved by hand and needed to be replaced.


Schiaward Port Stringer (Delam).jpg



This picture below shows the length of the stringer looking from the transom forward. I made one cut on both sides of the stringer relatively close to the hull bottom.


Schiaward Port Stringer Initial Cuts.jpg



This picture below shows where the wood inside the glass is rotted. It wasn't visible until after the cut was made and the fiberglass was peeled upward by hand.


Schiaward Port Stringer Rot.jpg



This picture below shows the condition of the actual stringer when the fiberglass was pulled upwards. I was able to lift this fiberglass cap up without much effort as it was no longer "Bonded" to the stringer.


Schiaward Port Stringer Fiberglass Cap Lifted Off.jpg



This picture below shows the port side outer stringer lifted up from the hull bottom. It was not "Bonded" or adhered to the bottom of the hull. It looks as though the stringer was "Wet-bedded" or "Wet-set" when the hull was laid up. Over the years, the bond that was initially created by the resin had lost its grip on the stringer.


Schiaward Port Stringer Lifted Out.jpg



I am an "Equal opportunity" type of guy....so, since I'm pulling the port side outer stringer, I might as well pull the starboard outer stringer too. This picture below shows this stringer being cut out.


Schiaward Starboard Stringer Cut and Lifted Out.jpg



The starboard stringer didn't have the same level of "Delamination" but it too came out with no resistance.


Schiaward Starboard Stringer Removed.jpg



In this photo, you can see a slight bevel that was cut into the bottom of the stringer. This same angle will need to be recreated when the new stringers are cut and fit.


Schiaward Starboard Stringer Bevel.jpg



This last photo shows both stringers cut out and removed. All that remains is to grind back the small flange of fiberglass on each side where these stringers were set and clean up the areas near the kickboard.


Schiaward Outer Stringers Removed.jpg



While it seems I keep taking two steps backwards and one step forward, I'm happy to be replacing these now. Once I finish replacing the outer stringers, I will duplicate the above process with the center stringers. Fun times! :D

As always, thank you for following along!

Henry
 

Backlash

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Hello Guys!

Just a small update with the Schiaward..... Nothing fancy or stimulating but an update nonetheless! :D

I'm continuing with adding fillets to each of the smaller bulkheads which means more sanding both before and after. It's OK as I don't mind it.....I convince myself it's therapeutic.



Here is a photo of some of the bulkheads before fillets are added. I'm using the same process as explained earlier (Vinylester resin and Cabosil).


Schiaward bulkheads and ski locker support prior to fillets being applied.jpg



This picture shows one of the bulkheads for the ski locker with the fillet applied. Once the resin begins to kick, I'll peel the tape and let the fillet cure.


Schiaward mini bulkhead for ski locker with fillet applied.jpg



This is a picture of the transom knees being sanded prior to bonding the two layers together.


Schiaward Transom Knees being sanded.jpg



I chose to restore this sucker using plywood and other types of wood instead of using composites. One reason is because that's how I wanted to do it. The second reason is obviously cost. For example, a 4x8 sheet of 3/4 plywood will set me back about $45. The same size Coosa board (20lb.), will run about $220. Figure several sheets for a project like this not including the stringers. This is a topic that has been discussed a lot on other websites and there are pros and cons for each.

Knowing that moisture needs to remain outside of the hull, I'm taking every possible precaution I can to make sure these plywood pieces will be protected from any water intrusion.

So, that leads me to the topic of keeping water OUT of this boat. There are going to be four drain plugs in the bottom of this boat. Yes, four.

1. Transom
2. Rear of ski locker
3. Front of ski locker
4. Bottom of kick board

Should water make it's way into this boat (Which we all know it will!), I want to be able to manage where the water will have the ability to travel to and from.

If it enters the bilge, I want it to remain in the bilge until it is pumped out. I don't want it rolling forward into the ski locker underneath the proposed floor. Hence the reason for the drain plug at the rear of the ski locker.
If water does enter this small ski locker, I will open the plug and allow it to drain towards the rear and into the bilge. Then it will be pumped overboard or drained out the transom.
If water enters the floor area in front of the ski locker, I will open the front ski locker plug and allow the water to drain towards the rear.
And since I plan on making the bow area of this boat somewhat unusable except for wiring and other accessories, I want to keep that area dry and sealed from the elements. If for some reason water makes it's way into the bow area, I can drain the water through the plug installed in the bottom of the kickboard. Then, the water can travel through the ski locker and finally into the bilge.

Since each of the bulkheads between the inside stringers are being constructed of plywood and wrapped in fiberglass, I want to prevent any water from being absorbed into the bottom of the plywood where the drain plugs will be installed.

I will NOT be simply drilling a hole in the plywood and inserting a brass sleeve like you see on so many other boats. And I will not be coating the inside of the hole with a layer of resin hoping it keeps water out. I know for a fact that doesn't work. Look at how many transoms have needed to be replaced for that very reason. Enough of my blabbering.....


Here are some pictures of the stainless steel drain plugs we are using on this boat. They are investment cast stainless steel and the plugs themselves have an o-ring. The plugs are designed so that the plug can be loosened but will not fall out. They CAN be removed by simply pulling the plug completely and then continuing to unscrew the plug.


Schiaward Drain Plug closed view.jpg



Schiaward Drain Plug back side view.jpg



Schiaward Drain Plug open view.jpg



The below picture shows a copper sleeve that is the same diameter of the flange on the rear of the drain plug housing.


Schiaward Drain Plug copper sleeve.jpg



This picture below shows how the copper sleeve "Fits" over the rear portion of the drain plug housing and how it lines up with the flange.


Schiaward Drain Plug copper sleeve to use as mold.jpg



I wrapped the copper sleeve with a small piece of wax paper to create a crude mold.


Schiaward Drain Plug copper mold wrapped in wax paper.jpg



Using the same vinylester resin, I wet out two layers of 7.5 oz. cloth. Once the glass was thoroughly wet out, I wrapped the fiberglass around the copper sleeve with the wax paper. After a few minutes, the resin started to kick and I removed the copper sleeve and the wax paper. Here is the first layer of the sleeve I will eventually trim and insert in the bottom of each of the plywood bulkheads to eliminate the chance of water instusion.


Schiaward Drain Plug Sleeve first layer laminated.jpg



Yes, I know the "Ends" of the sleeve are dry and are not wet out. I did that on purpose so I could handle the sleeve while it was still wet. You can buy these types of fiberglass sleeves "Pre-fabbed" in different sizes and diamters, but what fun is that? :D

I will sand the inside and outside of this sleeve and apply several more layers of glass to strengthen each of these up. Once I have each sleeve the thickness that I want, I will trim each of these sleeves to the proper length and install them in the bulkheads where the drain plugs will be installed. This will minimize if not eliminate any chance of water seeping into the bulkhead.

The last two pictures are of the rear bulkhead that will separate the bilge compartment from the ski locker. I've added two small blocks on each side of this bulkhead to help support the battery tray. These blocks have the same shape as the hull bottom and these were attached the same way as the other bulkheads I've assembled. Fillets will be added to these blocks and then the entire assembly will be fiberglassed and set in the hull bottom. (Between the two small blocks is where I will add the fiberglass sleeve and a drain plug.)


Schiaward ski locker bulkhead with battery tray supports.jpg



Schiaward ski locker bulkhead with battery tray supports installed.jpg


As always, thank you for following along! (Sorry for the long post!)

Take care and stay safe!

Henry
 

Backlash

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Thank you Ka0tyk I appreciate it! ;)

I'm the kind of guy who usually asks "How did they do that?" So, thinking I may not be the only person like this, I figured I would try and share for anyone else with the same illness. :D

And I enjoy this stuff. I really do. Otherwise I wouldn't be doing it.

Henry
 

ka0tyk

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Thank you Ka0tyk I appreciate it! ;)

I'm the kind of guy who usually asks "How did they do that?" So, thinking I may not be the only person like this, I figured I would try and share for anyone else with the same illness. :D

And I enjoy this stuff. I really do. Otherwise I wouldn't be doing it.

Henry
its lot of work for something that no one will ever see. its a bummer that the outer stringers were basically just sitting inside a fiberglass tube. im curious, what do you think about your inner stringers? id have to imagine they were laid up the same way?
 

Backlash

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Yes Sir, that's exactly what was going on. Initially, the hull had more strength when everything was fresh and bonded together. But by the looks of the two outer stringers, the wood was just along for the ride. Im confident the other two are in the same condition as they were laid up at the same time and in the same manner.

Now, some people will argue the point and say the hull gets its support and rigidity from the vertical plane of the layers of glass and not from the actual wood inside the stringer. They will say "Look at the large number of fishing boats that use foam filled fiberglass stringers....." (Mako comes to mind.)

Anyways, I am replacing all four stringers and will be bonding the new wood to the hull so that they stay put. I will replace the smaller outside stringers first, wait for everything to cure and set up, and then remove and replace the inner stringers. That way the hull isn't without some form of support.

And what you said is exactly true. A lot of the work I'm doing will not be visible and nobody will probably ever see it. But I will know how it was repaired and I don't want to cut any corners. As I said, I want to do this work to the best of my ability and I think a lot of the small details that I focus on now are what will give a nice finished product. I'm not in any hurry with this project and there are no deadlines. Slow and steady! :D

As always, thank you for following along I really appreciate it.

Henry
 

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Good morning! :D

I had a few minutes to play around in the garage yesterday morning, so I worked on the first of the drain plug sleeves. I trimmed the ends of the tube back and roughed up the surface to promote a better bond with the second layer of glass and resin. I mixed up a small amount of resin and coated a piece of 7.5 oz. cloth. Once the cloth was thoroughly wet out, I rolled the glass around the tube and set it aside to cure.

The first image shows the tube cut and sanded with 40 grit. Using a hack saw blade designed to cut metal, it only took a few seconds to trim the ends of this piece down.


Schiaward Drain Plug Sleeve Cut and Sanded.jpg



The second image shows the cloth laid out prior to adding the resin. Sorry, no pictures of the resin being applied (Cell phone preservation!). Once things were wet out, I simply wrapped the new glass around the first sleeve, squeezing out any excess resin along the way.


Schiaward Drain Plug Sleeve second layer of glass.jpg



The last image shows the drain plug sleeve curing with the second application of cloth. If you look inside the sleeve, you can see where the first section of the sleeve begins. Once this sets up and cures, I will again trim the ends and sand it smooth. I will make three or four of these and set them aside so they can later be fit into the bulkheads and the transom.


Schiaward Drain Plug Sleeve Second Layer of Glass Curing.jpg



I realize these are not earth-shattering developments or anything like that. These are just some pictures of the fun little parts I will continue working on whenever time permits.

Thanks again for following along and have a great day!

Henry
 

Backlash

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Hello!

Time for some pictures and a little update with this girl. Not too much to report; just spending time on some of the little stuff. I mixed up some more fillet material and added more fillets in the corners and filled in some of the holes where screws were installed. I also bonded the transom knee pieces together and did some more work on the drain plug project.


The first two pictures show the fiberglass sleeve and how it fits around the flange on the drain plug assembly.


Schiaward Drain Plug Sleeve Test Fit.jpg



Schiaward Drain Plug Sleeve Test Fit Rear.jpg



The third picture shows the way the drain plug assembly will be fitted in the bulkhead. This bulkhead will be between the rear of the "Ski locker" and the bilge compartment.


Schiaward Drain Plug Inserted into rear ski locker bulkhead.jpg



In the next picture, you can see how the sleeve will be fit inside the bulkhead. The space between the sleeve and the bulkhead was cut out "Oversize" on purpose. This gap will be filled with the same vinylester resin and cabosil mixture that I have been using for the fillets.


Schiaward Drain Plug Sleeve Inserted into rear ski locker bulkhead prior to filling with cabosil.jpg



The next picture shows the sleeve in the bulkhead and the back side of the sleeve supported with tape. The sleeve was pushed down slightly so that it protruded through the bulkhead on the back side.


Schiaward Drain Plug Sleeve inserted into rear ski locker bulkhead 3.jpg



The next picture shows the fillet material applied around the drain plug sleeve. I mixed it more thick that usual which is why there is so much smeared across the tape around the sleeve. :D


Schiaward Drain Plug Sleeve Inserted into bulkhead with fillet poured.jpg



This picture shows some of the other pieces I was working on at the same time.


Schiaward Bulkheads with fillets and drain plug sleeve installed.jpg



The next two pictures show how the fillet looks around the sleeve once the tape was removed. I will sand everything down so that the sleeve and the fillet material are even or level with the bulkhead.


Schiaward Ski Locker Rear Bulkhead with drain plug sleeve installed tape removed.jpg



Schiaward Ski Locker Rear Bulkhead with drain plug sleeve battery tray side.jpg



The last picture shows how the drain plug sleeve protrudes through the bulkhead on both sides. Once this cures overnight, I will sand both sides of the sleeve and fillet material so it is all even with the bulkhead.


Schiaward Ski Locker Rear Bulkhead with drain plug sleeve edge view.jpg



Once the sleeve and the fillets are all sanded smooth and flush, I can begin laying cloth on these individual pieces. When the cloth is applied, it will overlap the fillet material between the bulkhead and the sleeve (Multiple layers on both sides of each piece). This will prevent any water from finding its way into the core material, thus preventing any rot in the future.

Thank you guys for following along. I understand these updates are not "Earth-shattering" but they are some of the small things I enjoy doing and I thought some viewers might enjoy seeing how my crazy mind works. :D


Henry
 

Backlash

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025, thank you!

I had a few minutes this morning to sand down the excess fiberglass sleeve and the buildup of the vinylester/cabosil fillet material. I'm really happy with the way this has turned out. Now I need to do this "Drain plug" process a few more times. Hahahahaa!!


Here, the sleeve and fillet material has been sanded smooth and is now flush with the surface of the bulkhead.


Schiaward Bulkhead with Drain Plug Sleeve Installed and sanded.jpg



This is how the drain plug assembly fits into this bulkhead.


Schiaward Ski Locker Bulkhead with Drain Plug Sleeve Sanded and Drain Plug Assembly Fitted.jpg



This picture below shows the drain plug flange sitting flush against the bulkhead. If you look towards the top of this picture, you can see one of the screw holes that I have also filled with the same fillet material. It too has been sanded flush with the surface of the bulkhead. Just a minor detail. ;)


Schiaward Ski Locker Bulkhead with Drain Plug Assembly Set in.jpg



This image below shows the back side of the bulkhead and how the drain plug will protrude into the bilge area (When the drain plug is installed and closed). This is the less attractive side of the drain plug assembly but that is OK. This area will not be seen once this bulkhead is installed in the hull. (I am putting together a battery tray that will sit just above this drain plug that will hide this from view.)


Schiaward Bulkhead with Drain Plug Sleeve and Drain Assembly View from Bilge Side.jpg



I need to add a few more fillets and fill in four or five other screw holes on this particular bulkhead. Once the fillets are completed and the screw holes are filled, I will again sand everything flush. I can then cover the entire bulkhead with multiple layers of fiberglass. Once this bulkhead is encased in fiberglass, the chance of water intrusion will be minimal at best. ;)

This process is not something you typically see on "Production" family boats or even on some of the West Coast custom boats we are familiar with. The entire process for this one bulkhead only took about an hour if you don't factor in the time waiting for things to cure. But the end result will be a panel with a rigid core that will essentially be "Watertight." And it should remain that way for a long period of time.

As always, thank you for following along. :D

Henry
 

Backlash

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Good evening Folks!

I had a productive day on the Schiaward and am happy with the progress I made. Needless to say, I'm a little itchy. :D

There are some holes in the transom that I want to fill/repair from the inside of the hull before I install the new transom. Doing this will make the repairs invisible once the new transom is in place. Once there is enough support on the inside of the hull, I can later complete the remainder of the repairs from the outside.

I got the outer stringer beds ground down and removed a lot of built up resin and a little bit of delaminated glass. There is still more delaminated glass to grind out as you can see in the pictures.



Marked and cut the inner stringers back from the transom so I can slip the new transom core in place.


Schiaward Inner Stringers Marked for Cuts.jpg



Schiaward Inner Stringers Cut out for Transom Replacement.jpg



Once the inner stringers were trimmed back, I began grinding out the "Lip" that was left where the outer stringers were glassed. In the above pictures, you can see the 1/8-1/4" lip sticking up from the hull bottom. These were removed the length of the hull on both outside stringers. In the first picture below, you can still see some delaminated fiberglass that needs to be ground out. With the pile of dust in the boat at the time, I missed a few spots.


Schiaward Port Outer Stringer Bed Ground Flush.jpg



Schiaward Bilge and Stringers Cut Back for Transom Replacement and Outer Stringer Beds Ground Fl.jpg



This is about 4 pounds of fiberglass and excess resin that I ground out from just the outer stringer beds.


Schiaward Pile of Glass and Sawdust from Grinding of Stringer Beds.jpg



In the below picture, you can see the bed that the stringers are set in. These beds are the same where the outer stingers were installed. I will replace the new stringers in the same place but will be bonding the new stringers in instead of leaving them "Free-floating." :D


Schiaward Bilge and Stringers Cut Back for Transom Replacement.jpg



Once I cleaned up the mess inside the hull, I moved to the outside of the transom to address some holes I want to fill in prior to replacing the transom. The first picture shows the original hole in the cap where the ski pylon use to protrude from. The pylon was mounted (Loosely!), near the bottom of the transom above the drain plug. There was enough movement in this ski pylon to allow the pylon to pull back against the cap. Hence the stress cracks around the bottom of the opening. Hey, it's a 30 year old boat! :D



Schiaward Ski Pylon Hole in Cap Notice Stress Cracks.jpg



I ground this area only partially to show how delamination looks below the gelcoat. The lighter colored areas around the bottom of this opening still have delaminated glass that needs to be removed. There are also stress cracks travelling both left and right from this opening. I continued grinding this area but I wanted to snap the picture to show you what still needs to be removed in order to properly repair a damaged area. The stress cracks you see will also be ground out and repaired.


Schiaward Ski Pylon Hole in Cap Notice Light Coloration of Fiberglass that has Delaminated.jpg



The following picture shows this area ground back to "Good" glass. The edges have all been beveled which will make the repair easier to be feathered into the existing glass.


Schiaward Transom Ski Pole Opening and Stress Cracks Ground Out.jpg



There are a lot of other holes left in the transom that I want to repair. I continued grinding around the drain plug hole and the holes left from the inferior ski pylon mount. You will see a lot of stress cracks near the drain plug opening. This is due to the way the bottom of the ski pylon was mounted to the hull. The two holes you see above the drain plug opening are from holes that were drilled through the transom for the ski pylon.


Schiaward Transom Drain Plug and Old Ski Pylon Mount Prior to Grinding for Repairs.jpg



This picture below is blurry and I apologize.....the camera wouldn't focus on the stress cracks themselves. But you get the idea.


Schiaward Transom Drain Plug and Old Ski Pylon Mount Holes and Stress Cracks.jpg



I continued by grinding back the holes created for the accelerator, throttle and steering cables and the bilge pump outlet. While I will be drilling these holes later on, I still want to repair them and drill the holes exactly where I want them.


Schiaward Transom Starboard Side Rigging Hole Ground for Repair.jpg



Schiaward Transom Rigging Hole Ground for Repair Notice No Delamination.jpg



In the following pictures, you can see where the gelcoat has been torn from the inner layers of glass. When I removed the transom tie-down eye-bolts and the swim platform brackets, the gelcoat peeled off. Someone had used a liberal amount of "Sealant" when these items were initially installed. Well, it wasn't actually sealant and it looked more like the 3M 5200 crap. The bonding strength of the 5200 is stronger than the bond between the gelcoat and the fiberglass; so when those items were removed, it peeled the gelcoat off with it. Some people sweat by that stuff.... I swear at it. :D There will not be any of it going on this hull as long as I own it.


Schiaward Transom Damage Prior to Grinding for Repairs.jpg



Schiaward Transom Damage Prior to Grinding for Repairs 2.jpg



Schiaward Transom Damage Prior to Grinding for Repairs 3.jpg



Schiaward Transom Damage Prior to Grinding for Repairs 4.jpg



The last two pictures shows the transom and the holes that were ground for repair. I left the 10 mounting holes for the transom bracket as these will be re-used when re-installing the outboard bracket. Cleaned-up of course, but re-used nonetheless. :D While I will be re-installing swim platforms and transom tie-downs on the Schiaward, they will be done differently to say the least. Better!


Schiaward Transom Holes Ground for Repairs.jpg



Schiaward Transom Holes Ground for Repairs 2.jpg



During the next few days, I will try and get the transom core trimmed to fit and the layers bonded together. I also have several fiberglass sleeves to slap together and these will be set aside and used later in the project (Transom and bulkhead drain plug sleeves). Obviously, there is still a LOT of work to do, including more grinding. Lots of grinding. LOTS! :D

As always, thank you for following along! Take care and stay safe!

Henry
 

Backlash

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Hey Guys!

After a wonderful weekend in Las Vegas with the little Lady, I found a little bit of time to tinker around on the Schiaward. Which basically means the itch has continued. :D

I started off by sanding down the inside of the transom skin near all of the holes that I was going to fill and repair. I also sanded down each of the holes on the outside of the transom to rough up the surface to help increase the "Tooth" in the existing glass. The holes that I am filling are the holes left from the previous parts that were installed on the transom (Swim steps, transom tie-downs, etc.). Once both sides of the transom skin were sanded, I cut out the necessary fiberglass mat cloth. For these repairs, I used 10 ounce fiberglass mat. After mixing the vinylester resin, I coated the existing surface of the transom with the resin. I then used the same resin and laminated each of the pieces of mat to the inside of the transom. Once these laminated pieces had cured, I moved to the outside of the boat. I sanded the areas that I had just laminated then mixed up a small batch of resin and fiberglass mat strands. Some will call it "Kitty hair." I then filled each of the small holes with this paste. Before the paste had cured, I then began laying up multiple layers of fiberglass mat. Once the first layer on the exterior of the transom had cured, I again sanded all of the repairs. I repeated the above process a second time and added larger pieces of the same fiberglass mat along with the same resin (Not the paste).



Here is the cloth with the patterns laid out ready to be cut. I like using a blue permanent marker when drawing the patterns on the mat cloth.



Schiaward Fiberglass Mat to Repair Inside of Transom.jpg



The picture below is a small piece I will be using to cover the two holes created by the transom tie down bolts. Leaving some or all of the blue ink on the fiberglass mat makes it easier to see the edge of the piece once you soak the mat in resin. The mat will almost turn clear and if you are laminating multiple pieces at the same time, you will lose the piece because the edges will disappear.



Schiaward Fiberglass Mat Cut to Cover Transom Tie Down Holes.jpg



The blue tape on the outside of the hull just keeps the resin from dripping out through the holes and onto the exterior of the hull.



Schiaward Transom Repairs Holes Covered with Tape to Prevent Resin Running Through Holes from In.jpg



Here are the same components I've been using throughout this rejuvenation process. The small stack of fiberglass mat is stacked in order from left to right and top to bottom, for the inside of the transom. Once you mix the resin, you want to have everything planned out and ready to go (Including acetone in case you make a mess).



Schiaward Fiberglass Mat Cut to Size and Ready to Wet Out.jpg



The next two pictures show the repairs looking at the inside of the transom. You can see the outline of the fiberglass mat where each repair was made. There will be additional layers of new glass installed on the inside of this transom at a later date. I simply did this to give the repairs on the exterior of the transom something to "Stick" to.



Schiaward Fibergalss Mat Glassed In on Inside of Transom.jpg



Schiaward Transom Holes Covered on Inside of Transom.jpg



The next two pictures show the transom from the outside. You can see the new layer of mat on the inside of the holes. Each of these was sanded to give the new glass some tooth. Once everything was sanded smooth, I used the "Kitty hair" or paste, to fill each of the holes. Since I was working rather quickly, I didn't have a chance to take pictures of these steps. Once the small holes were filled with a layer of thick paste, I started the layup process. Immediately after putting the paste in each of the smaller holes, I put a small round piece of mat over the paste. The first layer of mat was slightly smaller than each of the holes. Once I had several small "Plugs" shoved in each of the holes, I began layering the fiberglass mat over each of the holes.



Schiaward Transom Holes Prepped on Exterior of Hull.jpg



Schiaward Transom Holes Prepped and Sanded Ready for Filling.jpg



Once the first several layers had cured, I went back and sanded each of the repaired areas. I did this to remove any rough edges and to also roughen up the surface for the next layer of mat.



Schiaward Transom Repairs after First Smaller Layers of Fiberglass Mat.jpg



The next three pictures show the final layer of fiberglass mat after it was applied to the above-described areas. This last layer is still slightly lower than the gelcoat on the hull which will leave me just enough room for sanding and filling....and then more sanding. :D



Schiaward Transom Repairs After Laying Second Layer of Fiberglass Mat.jpg



Schiaward Transom Holes Last Layer of Mat over Starboard Side Holes.jpg



Schiaward Transom Holes Last Layer of Mat over Swim Step Holes and Drain Plug Hole and Two Brack.jpg



The last picture shows the transom with majority of the holes filled on the lower half of the hull. Since we are reinstalling this outboard bracket in the same place, I am not filling those particular holes. As you can see, some of the holes for the outboard bracket are being filled because there were stress cracks beginning to form. There are also a series of stress cracks along the top of the transom just above the top two holes for the outboard bracket. This series of stress cracks will also need to be ground out and filled. I will also be adding a series of holes in this transom when it comes time to install the new transom core.....so this tutorial on filling holes in fiberglass may be repeated in the near future. :D



Schiaward Transom Holes Repaired and Tape Removed.jpg



As you can see, I did not address the large holes on the top of the hull/deck joint. I want to lay a thicker layer of cloth and mat up underneath the gunnel above the transom before completing these repairs.

As always, thank you for following along!

Henry
 

rivergames

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That's some nice patch work. I never really mess with glass, but gotta glass in a bulkhead and a few wood blocks to support the foot throttle. Hopefully is turns out looking as good as your glass work :thumbup:
 

Rickybobby

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Backlash, I am blown away by your work and thank you for posting up pics and details about your project. I am contemplating similar work on my son's 20ft Campbell and wonder if you did any special bracing on the hull when you pulled or popped out the stringers ??? I had considered doing one stinger at a time as to not "upset" the shape of the hull when they came out. Just curious what your thoughts were on this.
thanks
rb
 
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