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Very unlucky boater is very lucky to be alive

WhatExit?

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HocusPocus

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I couldn't imagine being in that situation, glad he made it to safety.
 

lake p.a.l.

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Wonder how far offshore he was when it capsized & what caused it
 

Taboma

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Wonder how far offshore he was when it capsized & what caused it
Article mentioned finding some 86 miles offshore, east coast Florida. Which means he was getting a free ride North at about 4 mph courtesy of the Gulf Stream and headed further out to sea. 32 ft Sea Ray Express cruiser, they have twins, so curious about the mechanical issue, why didn't he mayday on the VHF ? Woke up when the water reached the V-berth, so either he had a bad leak or got run over in the early morning hours. Anyway, he's one lucky dude that the Angeles spotted him.

Doesn't look comfortable, but beats being on the evening dinner menu.

Stuart Bee.JPG


Stuart Bee Sting Ray Sea Ray.JPG


Stuart Bee Sting Ray.JPG


MV Angeles.JPG
 

lake p.a.l.

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Strange he wouldn't have a pfd on. Glad they rescued him. I'd like to hear what happened to cause this so I can learn from it.
 

Taboma

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Strange he wouldn't have a pfd on. Glad they rescued him. I'd like to hear what happened to cause this so I can learn from it.
According to what I read, he was sleeping in the V-Berth, apparently unaware of taking on water and by the time he awoke, his only exit was the small deck hatch in the berth.
A few head scratchers about the story.
Leaving at 4pm, being 80+ miles offshore, a mechanical failure losing both engines, why no VHF distress calls, no PFD on or at hand, as you mentioned.
Not suggesting fowl play, just curious about a few details. Also the new articles had this container ship listed at 225 FEET long, very strange tiny size for any container ship.
Actually it's 225 meters, 738 Feet, Liberian registered.
Regardless he's damned lucky.
 

lake p.a.l.

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According to what I read, he was sleeping in the V-Berth, apparently unaware of taking on water and by the time he awoke, his only exit was the small deck hatch in the berth.
A few head scratchers about the story.
Leaving at 4pm, being 80+ miles offshore, a mechanical failure losing both engines, why no VHF distress calls, no PFD on or at hand, as you mentioned.
Not suggesting fowl play, just curious about a few details. Also the new articles had this container ship listed at 225 FEET long, very strange tiny size for any container ship.
Actually it's 225 meters, 738 Feet, Liberian registered.
Regardless he's damned lucky.
I ton of details are not adding up in this story. Hope he is thankful for being rescued.
Thanks for the info
 

LowRiver2

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And after all that he had to climb a caving ladder up the freighter . Those are no joke , especially after that ordeal. Adrenilene is your friend. I always remember these guys below when I’m smoked climbing these ladders:

 

Taboma

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And after all that he had to climb a caving ladder up the freighter . Those are no joke , especially after that ordeal. Adrenilene is your friend. I always remember these guys below when I’m smoked climbing these ladders:

The pics of him climbing aboard, seem to show a ladder that has larger steps. Not stating it wouldn't be arduous after clinging to that boat's bow for so many hours, but probably a design more preferred and or required by overweight and slightly aging harbor pilots for boarding. 😉

Stuart Bee ladder.jpg
 

LowRiver2

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The pics of him climbing aboard, seem to show a ladder that has larger steps. Not stating it wouldn't be arduous after clinging to that boat's bow for so many hours, but probably a design more preferred and or required by overweight and slightly aging harbor pilots for boarding. 😉

View attachment 947640
I climb both. While the wider steps help, the ladder rarely is flush with the hull and it still caves like the traditional ones.
They suck period. All about technique to make it it bearable.
 

stephenkatsea

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That ladder looks like the standard pilot boarding/Jacob's ladder of today. Yes, they require strength and agility. Very hard to imagine retaining those capabilities after that many hours clinging to that bow pulpit. I agree, there seems to be something missing from this story.
 

PlanB

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Boating in the ocean is a whole different deal than lake boating. I have been on a sinking boat, and having a radio saved our ass. We were able to call the CG on 16 and the Harbor Patrol pumped us out before the boat went down. I have also lost both motors on a boat at night off of Dana Point.
 

coolchange

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Any bigger boat I've been on in the ocean has bilge alarms. Not saying it's a requirement.
Can't imagine standing there all night listening to ssssssssssss as the air leaks out of a piece of deck hardware.
 

Ziggy

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Any bigger boat I've been on in the ocean has bilge alarms. Not saying it's a requirement.
Can't imagine standing there all night listening to ssssssssssss as the air leaks out of a piece of deck hardware.
No kidding. What came to mind for me was it doesn't look like he had much flotation remaining in the bow.😳
 
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