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rivermobster

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You don’t think that there could possibly be some bad actors purposefully draining our lakes and reservoirs for political reasons do you?

Yep. Same people that put the chip in the covid vaccine.

Fucking Illuminati are Everywhere! 😎
 

Sleek-Jet

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I can't even imagine the amount of energy required to pump 1 acre feet of water 10,500 feet vertically.

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Pumped water storage generation is a thing, so "they" could scale it up pretty easy.

Of course pumped water storage systems only pencil out if you have cheap off hours baseload generation (coal, nuclear)
 

Flying_Lavey

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Pumped water storage generation is a thing, so "they" could scale it up pretty easy.

Of course pumped water storage systems only pencil out if you have cheap off hours baseload generation (coal, nuclear)
That is typically used for load shifting (pump in the evening or during off peak times and let it flow back down for generation during peak load). Pumping water up for domestic and agricultural use doesn't really make much financial sense.

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BoatCop

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That is kind of bizarre, I went straight to 1983 (Colorado Basin - Percent of Median Snowpack) and there is zero for June. We must be reading this wrong or something. The flood was in 1983.

Colorado River Flood of 1983

*EDIT*
Looks like a lot of the snowpack in 1983 melted during June maybe that's why there was zero?

FLOODS ALONG COLORADO RIVER SET OFF A DEBATE OVER BLAME

As of each Jan. 1, the bureau must have storage space in the system for at least 5.3 million acre feet of water. This year the bureau had more than 6 million acre feet in the system on Jan. 1, when it was expecting, based on longterm projections of weather patterns, a spring runoff of 7.8 million acre feet, slightly higher than average.

Those projections dropped by March 1 to 6.7 million acre feet, and Federal engineers reduced releases from the dams. As far downstream as Mohave Valley, there was so little water in the river last winter that residents say they could wade across barely knee-deep.

Even as recently as May 1, Federal engineers foresaw no problem, although they had resumed excess releases from Hoover Dam. With the shank of the snow season over in the high country, forecasters from the National Weather Service and the bureau were predicting a runoff only about 117 percent of normal.

Then a series of unusual storms in late May buffeted the Rockies, dramatically increasing the snowpack. A sudden warming trend followed near the end of May, and forecasters found themselves looking at a sudden surge in runoff, with no place to store it in downstream reservoirs. Double Usual Runoff Forecast

Between June 6 and June 28, forecasts of projected runoff jumped from 9.1 million acre feet to 14.6 million acre feet, which is 210 percent of normal.

The 1983 floods weren't the result of too much water, but of poor, arrogant, PR based planning. Glen Canyon (Lake Powell) was completed in 1963 and predicted a 20 year period to fill to capacity. Bureau of Reclamation wanted to showcase their accomplishment of "completing" the Colorado River Project by ensuring that all reservoirs were at 100%, heading into summer '83. What they didn't bank on was a freak heavy snowfall in late spring, followed by an early warm spell, dumping all that run-off into an already full system. If they had just held back some room in the Lakes for safety, it wouldn't have been an issue.

I always wondered what the effect on River demographics would have been without the flood. Prior to that, the Parker Strip was the wild, no holds barred, wasteland for partying, and Lake Havasu was a more laid back, family oriented destination, ala Mohave or Mead. While Copper Canyon, the Sandbar, and the Channel existed, it was never really a "party" or anything approaching overcrowded. But with Parker shut down in 1983 and 1984, (much as it is today), everyone "discovered" the Lake and the rest is history. When the Strip was re-opened, the families (not to mention fishermen, going after the huge cats and bass dumped from the bottom of the Lake) moved down there and left the Lake for the former Parker idiots and several thousand of their close friends and associates. It took probably another 10 years for the Strip and the Lake to balance out to the current idiot-family ratio.
 
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rivermobster

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The 1983 floods weren't the result of too much water, but of poor, arrogant, PR based planning. Glen Canyon (Lake Powell) was completed in 1963 and predicted a 20 year period to fill to capacity. Bureau of Reclamation wanted to showcase their accomplishment of "completing" the Colorado River Project by ensuring that all reservoirs were at 100%, heading into summer '83. What they didn't bank on was a freak heavy snowfall in late spring, followed by an early warm spell, dumping all that run-off into an already full system. If they had just held back some room in the Lakes for safety, it wouldn't have been an issue.

I always wondered what the effect on River demographics would have been without the flood. Prior to that, the Parker Strip was the wild, no holds barred, wasteland for partying, and Lake Havasu was a more laid back, family oriented destination, ala While Copper Canyon, the Sandbar, and the Channel existed, it was never really a "party" or anything approaching overcrowded. But with Parker shut down in 1983 and 1984, (much as it is today), everyone "discovered" the Lake and the rest is history. When the Strip was re-opened, the families (not to mention fishermen, going after the huge cats and bass dumped from the bottom of the Lake) moved down there and left the Lake for the former Parker idiots and several thousand of their close friends and associates. It took probably another 10 years for the Strip and the Lake to balance out to the current idiot-family ratio.

And that's the facts jack!!! 👍

Lemme help you with this so you can wonder not more...

In 1984 Regan signed a new law changing the drinking age to 21 nation wide.

Yeah so?

Prior to that, EVERYONE who wanted to party (from socal) went to Sundance to get Fucking hammered!!!!! The drinking age in AZ was 19 prior to that, so that's why Sundance was full of 19 year old idiots. And yes, I was one of those idiots, although I was over 19 by that time.

Also remember, 29 Palms was in full swing back in those days. I remember the jar heads from cornfields back east, standing with their backs to the wall, mouths hanging wide open, just watching all the debauchery that they had never seen the likes of before. It was comedy at it's finest!!! 😂

IMHO, the drinking age change was the main reason people moved to the lake to party. The floods? Meh, not so much. But they both happened at pretty much the same time. :)

And yeah, they were Wild times for sure. 😁 👍 😁
 
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