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SoCalDave

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My Cousin did the Genealogy thing back in 2002 and was able to go back to 1798 for our family on my Dads side. Here's one small article she documented. Dewey was my Grandfather I never got to meet, Ralph was my Father and Garry was my older brother. Warning, a little long of a read.

Dewey Harrison Marlow was born in Campbell County, Tennessee on April 9, 1898. When he was less than a month old, his father, Maynard Marlow died from tetanus poisoning from an accident with a pitchfork. His mother, Rosa McGhee Marlow,had five young children to raise on her own. Rosa’s sister, Parisyda, had married Maynard’s father, Thomas Marlow, less than two years before, after the death of Maynard’smother Millie Ann. Thomas & his young wife took the family in and helped raise the children with their own.

When Dewey was in his teens he fibbed about his age and joined the army. He was first stationed Camp Chaffe, Arkansas. While there, he met a young girl by the name of Lessie Kathleen Lewis ata YWCA dance. After leaving school, Lessie and her sister Azalee had come to Little Rock from Lafayette County, Mississippi to work at Gus Blass’s Department Store and stayed with their mother’s sister. The aunt was a little too strict on the girls, so they moved into the YWCA. Dewey and Lessie dated off and on for several months. Dewey proposed marriage, and Lessie declined stating she vowed never to marry. The Army transferred Dewey to Fort Oglethorpe, Georgia, and the two corresponded by letter for several months. He got a furlowed and took a train back to Little Rock. He told Lessie he didn’t care if she vowed never to marry, he came back to Little Rock to marry her and that is exactly what he did.
Dewey was an enterprising young man. When he first transferred to Georgia, he got a car, an old Essex, and ran a taxi service from Fort Oglethorpe into Chattanooga; hauling soldiers on leave to town. The taxi business became quite lucrative and he purchased a new Model T-Ford for $400 and hired an army buddy to help him. He did a little bootlegging on the side and helped the soldiers find “entertainment” while on leave.

Dewey first came through Crossville on his honeymoon in 1921. As Dewey told the story, he was traveling from Little Rock, Arkansas to his hometown of Lafollette, Tennessee, taking his new bride home in his Model T home to impress the family. He said as he started to climb the mountain from Sparta to Crossville on the dirt road he became stuck in the mud. He had to pay a farmer $2.00 to pull the Model T up the mountain with a team of mules. He always accused the farmer of carrying water to pouring onto the roads, making it impassible.

The couple made their home near the military base in Fort Oglethorpe. Soon Lessie was pregnant with her first child; she gave birth to Margie at the military hospital on the base in February of 1922. Later that year Dewey left the military and moved his family to Chattanooga. The family continued to grow with Harold being born in August of 1923,Juanita in January 1926 and Ray in June 1927.

During this time, Dewey bought half interest in a poolroom, still bootlegging on the side. His partner skipped out on him and he took over the poolroom completely. Prohibition came and Dewey was in the position to take over the bootlegging business in Hamilton County, which he continued for three years.

He had three or four ways to market the liquor; one of the major distribution sources was through his milk and ice delivery services. He stored liquor in various hiding places; one the children remembered was in a three to four hundred gallon catch hidden under the fuel coal pile in the garage.

The moon-shiners on Signal Mountain distilled the liquor and Dewey provided the transportation to get the “shine” into the city. The local authorities didn’t disturb the business, because they were on the payroll. Dewey’s biggest problem was hijackers stealing his loaded delivery trucks coming down the mountain. He hired“shotgun guards” to protect his trucks, putting an end to the hijackings.

The ATU (Alcohol & Tobacco Unit) began to investigate bootlegging in Chattanooga. They caught two of Dewey’s major employees distributing liquor; one was his close friend, Tom Hunter from the army days. The ATU was “railroading” Tom. Dewey paid $27,000 to get charges dropped against him. Prohibition was over and Dewey was out of business.

In 1929, Dewey decided it was time to leave Chattanooga. He bought an old run-downed farmhouse and 85 acres on Pomona Road near Crossville for $2,250.Dewey hired carpenters from Chattanooga, restored the old house and moved the family in 1930. The family continued to expand with Aaron, born in July of 1933, and Ralph in January 1935.
Dewey tried his hand at farming and discovered he didn’t know anything about it. He hired his neighbors for fifty cents a day to farm his land and started “pen hooking” cattle. He would buy livestock from the farmers and take them to the livestock sale. In 1936, Dewey and a schoolteacher by the name of Fred L. Hampton started a stockyard sale in the barns where Garrison Park is today. Every Tuesday, Dewey’s son, Harold had permission to leave school early to assist at the sale. He received 25 cents a day for his efforts. Dewey along with Burr Cole, Leonard Cole, Mr. Hamby and Ralph Potter pooled their resources building the old red stock barn on Elmore Road and moved the stock sales.
About 1945, Dewey bought an old warehouse built in the 1920’s from Tom Randolph between West Avenue and the railroad. He contracted with Tom Flynn to renovate the warehouse for his new business, Farmers Supply Warehouse. He would provide the necessary startup supplies for the farmers in the spring and wait for payment when the potato crops harvested in the fall. On the first floor, Dewey planned to have a cold storage warehouse. When the building was about ninety percent complete he found the cold storage equipment was on a three-year back order. The plans fell through.
Margie had married Mutt Lewis in 1942 and Harold married Marie Hinch when he returned from the service in 1946.The whole family worked to sort and pack the potatoes for shipment. The farmers would empty their potatoes into a hopper at the rear double doors of the building. The hopper would sort the potatoes according to size, the boys would sort out the rocks and bad potatoes and Charlie Barnwell would weigh each before passing the bags to Lessie and another lady to sew the bags. The bags were then loaded onto boxcars, three hundred bags to a car, and shipped. A&P was their largest customer.

In 1947, when Ray returned home from the Navy, Dewey didn’t think Farmer’s Supply could support four families and they needed to develop another source of income. Dewey had seen an advertisement in the Knoxville paper for dealers for Kaiser-Fraiser automobiles. He went to talk to the distributor and Marlow Motor Company became the new business with Dewey’s son, Harold as his business partner in the dealership. They started out with $3,000 capital and two cars, one Kaiser and one Fraiser.

In early 1948, Dewey & Harold decided they needed a line of trucks; a Rio Truck dealership was acquired. Within a year, they also had Willys and Studebaker. Strip mining was a big industry in Crossville and the Marlow’s truck sales went well.

Later in 1948, the Marlows signed an agreement to sell Pontiac & GMC. GM had strict stipulations on the dealership, sales were one car a month and they must divorce themselves from all other automotive lines. The Marlows formed a second dealership,Crossville Motor Company for the Kaiser-Fraiser, Rio and Willys sales. Crossville Motor Company was in a filling station ran by Ross Maynard, positioned where the LP Shanks building are today.They also had to provide a garage facility to repair the vehicles. Ernest Anderson had been renting half of the downstairs of the Farmer’s Supply building and using it for a repair facility. After much persuasion, Dewey convinced Ernest to work for him running the repair side of the business. The first Pontiac they sold was to Lloyd Hill, the assistant postmaster for $1360. It was one of the more economical models. Second was a loaded Silver Streak, sold to Roy Stone for about $1800. It had a straight eight, 105 horsepower. It could run 100 miles an hour; it just took five minutes to get there.

In the early years, the profits were very lean. Sometimes when earnings were low, Dewey would call York Brothers and wholesale used cars to them for working capital. By 1952, Kaiser-Fraiser was going out and GM was less strict on their demands. The two companies combined into Marlow Motor Company.

Harold discovered there was good money in used cars. He would purchase inventory from a company in Cleveland, Tennessee owned by Cletis Benton. Mr. Benton had the largest used car distribution in the south, selling about 2,000 cars weekly. He had a crew of men on the road purchasing used cars from rental companies like Hertz and Avis. He brought them in, refurbished them and sold the units wholesale to dealers. If parts were not available for repairs, Mr. Benton had the facilities to make any parts needed, from bodywork to upholstery to mechanical.

The business continued to grow.Dewey’s son, Aaron, became involved in Marlow Motor Company. He attended GM College in Detroit and helped with the day to day operations of the business.

Dewey had suffered two heart attacks and his health was beginning to decline. He became concerned with the well being of the family businesses so he took $12,000 from the working capital from Marlow Motor Company and paid off the mortgage on the building. Harold received a promissory note for his share of the working capital.

On a Sunday evening in late July of 1953 after spending the afternoon playing with his grandchildren, Dewey again began suffering chest pains. He went to his bedroom to rest and later died on the little balcony outside his bedroom. Besides his wife, Lessie, he was survived by their six children: two daughters, Margie, Mrs. Earl Lewis; Juanita, Mrs. William Ewing of Oak Ridge;four sons; Harold, Ray, Aaron and Ralph, and eleven grandchildren.

Ralph was in parts unknown,discovering the world with Milo Boston. Harold contacted the local sheriff and within hours, he located Ralph in Little Horse, Yukon awaiting repairs on his wrecked Pontiac. Ralph had been traveling to Alaska when he came upon a landslide.He tried to straddle a rock in the center of the road and cracked the transmission case. Ralph chartered a plane to Seattle, Washington and continued with a commercial flight on to Crossville arriving about thirty minutes before Dewey’s funeral.

Life changed for the Marlows. Son-in-law, Mutt Lewis and Ray took over Farmers Supply and Harold, Aaron and Ralph operated Marlow Motor Company. Aaron was just 19 years old and was considered a minor although he was married with three children. He was unable to sign any contracts for the company because of his age. A local attorney, Ligue Tollett suggested he file a petition with the court to remove the “disability of infancy”, which he did.

As the years went on each brother found his niche in the company. Harold was President, Aaron focused on the day to day operations and sales, and Ralph took care of the parts and service department.

In order to set up a retirement plan as suggested by General Motors Management team, the brothers found it necessary to incorporate the business. So on June 13, 1956 Marlow Motor Company filed apetition for incorporation with Harold as President, Lessie as Vice President and Aaron as Secretary-Treasurer. The following year, Lessie transferred her stock to Ralph and he became Vice President of the corporation.

In the late fifties, Mutt and Ray purchased the old Farmer’s Coop building at auction and moved Farmer’s Supply Warehouse a few hundred yards down

West Avenue and changed the name to Mountain Builders Supply.
GM decided they needed a smaller car to compete in the market, so they began selling Vauxhall, a small Pontiac manufactured in England and Opel, a small Buick made overseas. Opel had a fast little two-passenger sports car with a four-cylinder engine. The speedometer registered 160 mph and it could probably do that. A good fast bicycle could out run it in the first 100 yards, but it would take off after that. The headlamps would recess into the front of the car with a little lever. Pontiac began making the Tempest in 1961 and we said good-bye to Vauxhall.

Harold decided to expand to Rock-wood in 1960. He purchased a small trailer unit from Crossland Industries for an office and set up a used car lot on the left going into Rockwood from Highway 70, near the lumberyard. It wasn’t successful and closed within the year. You could find the little trailer on our used car lot with Linc Barker in side selling cars until 1986.

There were always stories to tell on the customers. We had a good customer that was a psychiatrist out of Cookeville. One time he brought his Pontiac Tempest wagon in for service with a piano strapped to the top of the car. We told him we couldn’t work on it until he removed the piano – we couldn’t even get it into the shop. Linc told the doctor he wished he would move his practice to Crossville, because he had plenty of sense, he just needed someone to teach him how to use it.

The business continued to grow. In 1966 the Buick dealership was acquired when D’Armond Motor Company closed. A few years later, in 1970 Marlow Motor Company purchased the oldwarehouses next to the original building from the Potato Farm after the death of Mr. Carter. The wooden warehouses were torn down and the brick structure was remodeled into service bays. An addition was added, joining the new service bays with the original building providing anew parts and service area. The original building was also renovated, expanding the offices and showrooms. The Midway Café was purchased and removed for additional space.

As some of the grandchildren grew older they too became involved in the business, George, Aaron’s son and Garry,Ralph’s son, began working after school washing cars and sweeping the lot. Following graduating from high school in1973, George attended GM College and focussed on sales and management while Garry began working in the shop as a mechanic.

In January 1976 Harold under wentby-pass surgery and was advised to limit his activities in the company. Health problems continued to plague the brothers when Ralph was involved in a near fatal automobile accident on September 4, 1976. Due to his injuries, Ralph was unable to return to work. He felt it necessary to sell his stock back to Marlow Motor Company and retire in January 1977. Harold’s health did not improve and he too found it necessary to retire and sell his stock later that year.

In July 1979, George decided to invest in the company, purchasing his first block of stock and becoming Vice President and Secretary of the Corporation with Aaron as President and Treasurer. The following month, Garry was killed in an automobile accident on

Lantana Road.
August 29, 1990 is remembered by many in Crossville, especially by Marlow Motor Company. It was on this day, in mid afternoon, a dark cloud covered the County. Winds up to 80 miles per hour and golf ball to baseball size hail pounded anything in the storm’s way. In less than an hour a path from Dripping Springs to Big Lick was carved by the storm. Marlow Motor was in the middle of the path. The building was secure with damage to the roof and several broken windows, but nearly all the car inventory was totaled from this natural disaster. Through the assistance of General Motors, the hail-damaged vehicles were donated to safety testing and for educational purposes. Slowly the new inventory began to arrive and business continued.

Aaron began having some health difficulties. He noticed some shortness of breath and chest pains. On May 23, 1996 Aaron had by-pass surgery. When he returned to the business the doctors suggested he reduce his work hours, turning more of the day to day operations over to George. In January 1998 Aaron developed a cold he couldn’t seem to shake. Near the end of January he discovered he had lung cancer. After a brief battle with the disease he died on March 14, 1998. Shortly afterwards Aaron’s brother, Ralph discovered a tumor in his throat. He too lost his battle on March 31, 1998.
 

DrunkenSailor

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The level of detail and the story telling nature of the information is pretty neat. Oral history passed down?

I wish I knew more about my family history. I know my family was not one of the original families to settle orange but they weren't far behind. I also know my great grandmother was married 7 times and all of her husband's died.

All of my history is bullet pointed like that. I wish I had more of the interesting details. Thanks for sharing it was a good read.
 

HocusPocus

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On my Dads side I have volumes of stuff from relatives who spend a lot of time gathering info and it is pretty neat to read. On my Mom's side.. pretty much nothing beyond her parents.
 

calkid

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I have an Uncle that researched our family back to when our Country was controlled by "Red Coats". I apparently had a Great Grandfather (x5 or so) that was a Hessian Soldier. Like many others, he swtched sides and fought against the British and settled here.
I really enjoyed reading your family story.
 

nameisbond

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On my dads side not much. Online my great grand fathers enlistment papers for WWI are online. My grand fathers motor torpedo boat in WWII is pictured with its crew at a museum and that picture is online. My mom side there is more records. But just, birth, marriage and death records. No stories with those records.

crew463.jpg
 

PlumLoco

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I have a buddy who still lives in the family house that was built 300 years ago, still actively farms the same fields. He "jokes" that it seems incomprehensible that a field can still have rocks in it, after being plowed for 300 years.
He has all kinds of history stored in that place.

I on the other hand, am adopted, and know literally nothing. My nonbiolgical adopted sister searched for her birth parents after college. Her mother's family had never left Anaheim. The entire extended family welcomed her with open arms and they have even taken vacations together.
 

jones performance

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i dont have much of a clue as to my family history other than my dads parents immigrated here from wales england. i dont know when my moms parents came here or where they were from. anyone that knew the history is long dead or unknown.
 

Hypnautic

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Here is part of my family history. Book is from around 2000. AandE also has an hour long documentary that plays every once and a while.
IMG_0012.JPG

If you see a Hairston almost a guarantee they can be tied to this family tree.
Our family history is also related to Daniel Boone. Gov. of Missouri during the Civil War.
 

Rajobigguy

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On my Dad's side of the family it has always been pretty well documented. Ties go all the way back to Eric the Red, loosely related to Swedish royalty. For all that notoriety, when My family migrated here from Sweden many came over as indentured servants. My mom's side was always a little less clear but then my daughter got into some pretty heavy research and it turns out that that side of the family was pretty interesting also. It seems that my mom's side of the family has been here since the American revolution. I don't recall the exact details off the top of my head but one of our ancestors was a colonel (weird because his first name was actually Colonel) in the revolutionary army.
 
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Rajobigguy

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My Cousin did the Genealogy thing back in 2002 and was able to go back to 1798 for our family on my Dads side. Here's one small article she documented. Dewey was my Grandfather I never got to meet, Ralph was my Father and Garry was my older brother. Warning, a little long of a read.

Dewey Harrison Marlow was born in Campbell County, Tennessee on April 9, 1898. When he was less than a month old, his father, Maynard Marlow died from tetanus poisoning from an accident with a pitchfork. His mother, Rosa McGhee Marlow,had five young children to raise on her own. Rosa’s sister, Parisyda, had married Maynard’s father, Thomas Marlow, less than two years before, after the death of Maynard’smother Millie Ann. Thomas & his young wife took the family in and helped raise the children with their own.

When Dewey was in his teens he fibbed about his age and joined the army. He was first stationed Camp Chaffe, Arkansas. While there, he met a young girl by the name of Lessie Kathleen Lewis ata YWCA dance. After leaving school, Lessie and her sister Azalee had come to Little Rock from Lafayette County, Mississippi to work at Gus Blass’s Department Store and stayed with their mother’s sister. The aunt was a little too strict on the girls, so they moved into the YWCA. Dewey and Lessie dated off and on for several months. Dewey proposed marriage, and Lessie declined stating she vowed never to marry. The Army transferred Dewey to Fort Oglethorpe, Georgia, and the two corresponded by letter for several months. He got a furlowed and took a train back to Little Rock. He told Lessie he didn’t care if she vowed never to marry, he came back to Little Rock to marry her and that is exactly what he did.
Dewey was an enterprising young man. When he first transferred to Georgia, he got a car, an old Essex, and ran a taxi service from Fort Oglethorpe into Chattanooga; hauling soldiers on leave to town. The taxi business became quite lucrative and he purchased a new Model T-Ford for $400 and hired an army buddy to help him. He did a little bootlegging on the side and helped the soldiers find “entertainment” while on leave.

Dewey first came through Crossville on his honeymoon in 1921. As Dewey told the story, he was traveling from Little Rock, Arkansas to his hometown of Lafollette, Tennessee, taking his new bride home in his Model T home to impress the family. He said as he started to climb the mountain from Sparta to Crossville on the dirt road he became stuck in the mud. He had to pay a farmer $2.00 to pull the Model T up the mountain with a team of mules. He always accused the farmer of carrying water to pouring onto the roads, making it impassible.

The couple made their home near the military base in Fort Oglethorpe. Soon Lessie was pregnant with her first child; she gave birth to Margie at the military hospital on the base in February of 1922. Later that year Dewey left the military and moved his family to Chattanooga. The family continued to grow with Harold being born in August of 1923,Juanita in January 1926 and Ray in June 1927.

During this time, Dewey bought half interest in a poolroom, still bootlegging on the side. His partner skipped out on him and he took over the poolroom completely. Prohibition came and Dewey was in the position to take over the bootlegging business in Hamilton County, which he continued for three years.

He had three or four ways to market the liquor; one of the major distribution sources was through his milk and ice delivery services. He stored liquor in various hiding places; one the children remembered was in a three to four hundred gallon catch hidden under the fuel coal pile in the garage.

The moon-shiners on Signal Mountain distilled the liquor and Dewey provided the transportation to get the “shine” into the city. The local authorities didn’t disturb the business, because they were on the payroll. Dewey’s biggest problem was hijackers stealing his loaded delivery trucks coming down the mountain. He hired“shotgun guards” to protect his trucks, putting an end to the hijackings.

The ATU (Alcohol & Tobacco Unit) began to investigate bootlegging in Chattanooga. They caught two of Dewey’s major employees distributing liquor; one was his close friend, Tom Hunter from the army days. The ATU was “railroading” Tom. Dewey paid $27,000 to get charges dropped against him. Prohibition was over and Dewey was out of business.

In 1929, Dewey decided it was time to leave Chattanooga. He bought an old run-downed farmhouse and 85 acres on Pomona Road near Crossville for $2,250.Dewey hired carpenters from Chattanooga, restored the old house and moved the family in 1930. The family continued to expand with Aaron, born in July of 1933, and Ralph in January 1935.
Dewey tried his hand at farming and discovered he didn’t know anything about it. He hired his neighbors for fifty cents a day to farm his land and started “pen hooking” cattle. He would buy livestock from the farmers and take them to the livestock sale. In 1936, Dewey and a schoolteacher by the name of Fred L. Hampton started a stockyard sale in the barns where Garrison Park is today. Every Tuesday, Dewey’s son, Harold had permission to leave school early to assist at the sale. He received 25 cents a day for his efforts. Dewey along with Burr Cole, Leonard Cole, Mr. Hamby and Ralph Potter pooled their resources building the old red stock barn on Elmore Road and moved the stock sales.
About 1945, Dewey bought an old warehouse built in the 1920’s from Tom Randolph between West Avenue and the railroad. He contracted with Tom Flynn to renovate the warehouse for his new business, Farmers Supply Warehouse. He would provide the necessary startup supplies for the farmers in the spring and wait for payment when the potato crops harvested in the fall. On the first floor, Dewey planned to have a cold storage warehouse. When the building was about ninety percent complete he found the cold storage equipment was on a three-year back order. The plans fell through.
Margie had married Mutt Lewis in 1942 and Harold married Marie Hinch when he returned from the service in 1946.The whole family worked to sort and pack the potatoes for shipment. The farmers would empty their potatoes into a hopper at the rear double doors of the building. The hopper would sort the potatoes according to size, the boys would sort out the rocks and bad potatoes and Charlie Barnwell would weigh each before passing the bags to Lessie and another lady to sew the bags. The bags were then loaded onto boxcars, three hundred bags to a car, and shipped. A&P was their largest customer.

In 1947, when Ray returned home from the Navy, Dewey didn’t think Farmer’s Supply could support four families and they needed to develop another source of income. Dewey had seen an advertisement in the Knoxville paper for dealers for Kaiser-Fraiser automobiles. He went to talk to the distributor and Marlow Motor Company became the new business with Dewey’s son, Harold as his business partner in the dealership. They started out with $3,000 capital and two cars, one Kaiser and one Fraiser.

In early 1948, Dewey & Harold decided they needed a line of trucks; a Rio Truck dealership was acquired. Within a year, they also had Willys and Studebaker. Strip mining was a big industry in Crossville and the Marlow’s truck sales went well.

Later in 1948, the Marlows signed an agreement to sell Pontiac & GMC. GM had strict stipulations on the dealership, sales were one car a month and they must divorce themselves from all other automotive lines. The Marlows formed a second dealership,Crossville Motor Company for the Kaiser-Fraiser, Rio and Willys sales. Crossville Motor Company was in a filling station ran by Ross Maynard, positioned where the LP Shanks building are today.They also had to provide a garage facility to repair the vehicles. Ernest Anderson had been renting half of the downstairs of the Farmer’s Supply building and using it for a repair facility. After much persuasion, Dewey convinced Ernest to work for him running the repair side of the business. The first Pontiac they sold was to Lloyd Hill, the assistant postmaster for $1360. It was one of the more economical models. Second was a loaded Silver Streak, sold to Roy Stone for about $1800. It had a straight eight, 105 horsepower. It could run 100 miles an hour; it just took five minutes to get there.

In the early years, the profits were very lean. Sometimes when earnings were low, Dewey would call York Brothers and wholesale used cars to them for working capital. By 1952, Kaiser-Fraiser was going out and GM was less strict on their demands. The two companies combined into Marlow Motor Company.

Harold discovered there was good money in used cars. He would purchase inventory from a company in Cleveland, Tennessee owned by Cletis Benton. Mr. Benton had the largest used car distribution in the south, selling about 2,000 cars weekly. He had a crew of men on the road purchasing used cars from rental companies like Hertz and Avis. He brought them in, refurbished them and sold the units wholesale to dealers. If parts were not available for repairs, Mr. Benton had the facilities to make any parts needed, from bodywork to upholstery to mechanical.

The business continued to grow.Dewey’s son, Aaron, became involved in Marlow Motor Company. He attended GM College in Detroit and helped with the day to day operations of the business.

Dewey had suffered two heart attacks and his health was beginning to decline. He became concerned with the well being of the family businesses so he took $12,000 from the working capital from Marlow Motor Company and paid off the mortgage on the building. Harold received a promissory note for his share of the working capital.

On a Sunday evening in late July of 1953 after spending the afternoon playing with his grandchildren, Dewey again began suffering chest pains. He went to his bedroom to rest and later died on the little balcony outside his bedroom. Besides his wife, Lessie, he was survived by their six children: two daughters, Margie, Mrs. Earl Lewis; Juanita, Mrs. William Ewing of Oak Ridge;four sons; Harold, Ray, Aaron and Ralph, and eleven grandchildren.

Ralph was in parts unknown,discovering the world with Milo Boston. Harold contacted the local sheriff and within hours, he located Ralph in Little Horse, Yukon awaiting repairs on his wrecked Pontiac. Ralph had been traveling to Alaska when he came upon a landslide.He tried to straddle a rock in the center of the road and cracked the transmission case. Ralph chartered a plane to Seattle, Washington and continued with a commercial flight on to Crossville arriving about thirty minutes before Dewey’s funeral.

Life changed for the Marlows. Son-in-law, Mutt Lewis and Ray took over Farmers Supply and Harold, Aaron and Ralph operated Marlow Motor Company. Aaron was just 19 years old and was considered a minor although he was married with three children. He was unable to sign any contracts for the company because of his age. A local attorney, Ligue Tollett suggested he file a petition with the court to remove the “disability of infancy”, which he did.

As the years went on each brother found his niche in the company. Harold was President, Aaron focused on the day to day operations and sales, and Ralph took care of the parts and service department.

In order to set up a retirement plan as suggested by General Motors Management team, the brothers found it necessary to incorporate the business. So on June 13, 1956 Marlow Motor Company filed apetition for incorporation with Harold as President, Lessie as Vice President and Aaron as Secretary-Treasurer. The following year, Lessie transferred her stock to Ralph and he became Vice President of the corporation.

In the late fifties, Mutt and Ray purchased the old Farmer’s Coop building at auction and moved Farmer’s Supply Warehouse a few hundred yards down

West Avenue and changed the name to Mountain Builders Supply.
GM decided they needed a smaller car to compete in the market, so they began selling Vauxhall, a small Pontiac manufactured in England and Opel, a small Buick made overseas. Opel had a fast little two-passenger sports car with a four-cylinder engine. The speedometer registered 160 mph and it could probably do that. A good fast bicycle could out run it in the first 100 yards, but it would take off after that. The headlamps would recess into the front of the car with a little lever. Pontiac began making the Tempest in 1961 and we said good-bye to Vauxhall.

Harold decided to expand to Rock-wood in 1960. He purchased a small trailer unit from Crossland Industries for an office and set up a used car lot on the left going into Rockwood from Highway 70, near the lumberyard. It wasn’t successful and closed within the year. You could find the little trailer on our used car lot with Linc Barker in side selling cars until 1986.

There were always stories to tell on the customers. We had a good customer that was a psychiatrist out of Cookeville. One time he brought his Pontiac Tempest wagon in for service with a piano strapped to the top of the car. We told him we couldn’t work on it until he removed the piano – we couldn’t even get it into the shop. Linc told the doctor he wished he would move his practice to Crossville, because he had plenty of sense, he just needed someone to teach him how to use it.

The business continued to grow. In 1966 the Buick dealership was acquired when D’Armond Motor Company closed. A few years later, in 1970 Marlow Motor Company purchased the oldwarehouses next to the original building from the Potato Farm after the death of Mr. Carter. The wooden warehouses were torn down and the brick structure was remodeled into service bays. An addition was added, joining the new service bays with the original building providing anew parts and service area. The original building was also renovated, expanding the offices and showrooms. The Midway Café was purchased and removed for additional space.

As some of the grandchildren grew older they too became involved in the business, George, Aaron’s son and Garry,Ralph’s son, began working after school washing cars and sweeping the lot. Following graduating from high school in1973, George attended GM College and focussed on sales and management while Garry began working in the shop as a mechanic.

In January 1976 Harold under wentby-pass surgery and was advised to limit his activities in the company. Health problems continued to plague the brothers when Ralph was involved in a near fatal automobile accident on September 4, 1976. Due to his injuries, Ralph was unable to return to work. He felt it necessary to sell his stock back to Marlow Motor Company and retire in January 1977. Harold’s health did not improve and he too found it necessary to retire and sell his stock later that year.

In July 1979, George decided to invest in the company, purchasing his first block of stock and becoming Vice President and Secretary of the Corporation with Aaron as President and Treasurer. The following month, Garry was killed in an automobile accident on

Lantana Road.
August 29, 1990 is remembered by many in Crossville, especially by Marlow Motor Company. It was on this day, in mid afternoon, a dark cloud covered the County. Winds up to 80 miles per hour and golf ball to baseball size hail pounded anything in the storm’s way. In less than an hour a path from Dripping Springs to Big Lick was carved by the storm. Marlow Motor was in the middle of the path. The building was secure with damage to the roof and several broken windows, but nearly all the car inventory was totaled from this natural disaster. Through the assistance of General Motors, the hail-damaged vehicles were donated to safety testing and for educational purposes. Slowly the new inventory began to arrive and business continued.

Aaron began having some health difficulties. He noticed some shortness of breath and chest pains. On May 23, 1996 Aaron had by-pass surgery. When he returned to the business the doctors suggested he reduce his work hours, turning more of the day to day operations over to George. In January 1998 Aaron developed a cold he couldn’t seem to shake. Near the end of January he discovered he had lung cancer. After a brief battle with the disease he died on March 14, 1998. Shortly afterwards Aaron’s brother, Ralph discovered a tumor in his throat. He too lost his battle on March 31, 1998.
Great story Dave.
 

stoker

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Here is part of my family history. Book is from around 2000. AandE also has an hour long documentary that plays every once and a while.
View attachment 923080
If you see a Hairston almost a guarantee they can be tied to this family tree.
Our family history is also related to Daniel Boone. Gov. of Missouri during the Civil War.
I am also related to Daniel Boone by marrag. Also related to one of the signers of the Declaration of Independence along with Reese Witherspoon.
 

C-2

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Awesome SoCal Dave!

My father's side of the family can be traced in this country back to about the early 1800's, with family member soldiers in the Mexican-American war and later, in the Civil War. My "modern" family hails from McKinney, Texas circa about 1900.

Our family was lucky, during the depression the Feds started numerous programs to stimulate the economy and to keep people working. One such program was the "Works Progress Administration" and they commissioned a study to document early Oklahoma history named the "Indian-Pioneer History Project for Oklahoma." They sent workers to interview residents to document history (kind of like the census does) and we had two family members interviewed. Both filed for allotments of land during the OK land lottery but did not draw claims. Every now and then I read their interviews that talk about wagons and ox teams, Indians in the Indian Territory, and other details of early Oklahoma life. Most importantly, the interviews led to information on other family members. I have the interviews in PDF format.

By chance and on Facebook, my brother found a guy in Oklahoma who shares my brother's name. Over the years they exchanged small talk, but the interviews we found (discussed-above) connected all the dots between our two families and although we have not done DNA, we believe we are in fact related. One time my brother sent me a photo of who I thought was my nephew - but it was the Okie's kid; my nephew and him look like twins! Heck, recently my nephew moved to OK and is in a business venture with the Okie family, lol.

My great, great grandmother moved back to McKinney/Sherman, TX on/about 1900.

My grandfather told me as a young man, he had to pay a dowry to my grandmother's father in order to remove her from the farm and marry her! He saved money for 2-years to afford her.

When I was a kid, my grandmother told me she worked at the courthouse in Sherman TX. She and my grandfather often recounted a story about a lynching in Texas that happened at the courthouse where she worked. I about crapped myself years later when I discovered their account of events was factually correct and their details spot on: https://www.tshaonline.org/handbook/entries/sherman-riot-of-1930

My grandparents were racist. Great people; I chalk it up to a different time and era as they really meant the derogatory comments they often made about back people. I sometimes wonder if they ever looked down on my mom, or even me, because of our Mexican ancestry. Ironically, it was a black nurse who was my grandfather's last confidant, and I think by that time, his beliefs had changed.

My 17-year old daughter flips out when I tell her our great, great uncle established the Colin County, TX KKK. I tell her it's part of our nation's history and part of our history too, but we don't talk about our TX roots that much, lol: https://texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth61096/m1/88/

My mother's father was Mexican, so the tree/trail for her family stops there, lol.

When I retire, I plan on digging further and verifying the origins of our surname, which I know originated in a small village in northern England. The funny part is, I don't look anything like my Irish, Scottish and English ancestors. I'm run of the mill half-Mexican with dark hair and eyes and complexion. To see my distant family members, they would probably think I'm full of crap, lol. :oops:🤘
 

stephenkatsea

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Been able to trace way back on my Mom's side. Particularly my maternal grandmother's family, the Barrett and Rousch families. First to arrive in America was 26 yr old Thomas Barrett. That was just a few years after the Pilgrims arrived. Thomas had no family here or with him. He may have been an indentured servant. He lived in the Massachusetts Colony. He was born in Thornbury England in 1609. He flourished in the Massachusetts Colony and married a Margaret Huntington. There were a number of Barrett's spread throughout the Colonies. Many of my ancestors fought in the Revolutionary and Civil Wars. I was able to trace the Barrett side back to my 17th Grandfather who was born in Suffolk England in 1356. His name was Galfrid Baret. Records show the family name originally had that simplistic spelling. By 1400 the spelling had become Barrett. Our grandson in NYC was given Barrett as his middle name. Twins were common in the Barrett's. One family had 15 children, which included 3 sets of twins. Our youngest daughter has twins. My heritage on my Mom's side is English and German. I was able to trace the Rousch family back to my 16th grandfather, Johan C Rousch. He was born in Zweibrucken Germany in 1400. My father's heritage is German and Irish. Not many records available for his family.

Interesting side story on my Mom's parents. Her Dad was Karl F Knetsch, a successful owner of a door and window manufacturing company in Los Angeles. Her Mom was Eva Knetsch (Barrett). She was extremely patriotic. She dedicated her life to aiding US Veterans, including the last Civil War survivors. My Grandfather had a legal financial case that made it all the way to the US Surpreme Court, he lost. Something to do with disallowed insurance interest on his IRS filings. It immediately pops up when googled as "Knetsch v. United States". The complete title of the case includes my Grandmother's name. She would have strangled my Grandfather had she known her name will be forever listed as having a Surpreme Court Case against the United States.
 
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dribble

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My grandparents on my mothers side immigrated from Italy in 1915. My grandmother died in 1926 when my mom was three. My grandfather was arrested by US Treasury agents in 1930 for counterfeiting with the mob and running liquor across state lines. He served time in Federal Prison, then was deported back to Italy. My mom and her two sisters were raised in a Catholic orphanage. My grandfather died in Naples in 1942. I know almost nothing about my grandparents on my father's side other than my grandfather died when my dad was five and his mother died when he was nineteen.
 

old rigger

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My mom was into genealogy, traced us coming to America in 1643.
John Putnam came from England with I think 6 kids and settled in Salem Massachusetts. There’s a college back there named after him.

His daughter Ann was the little bitch that lied about the whole Salem Witch thing. After 16 or 18 people were killed for practing witchcraft, she admitted she made the thing up. My youngest daughter was horrified to learn we were related to her when we went back to Salem a few years ago.

By the way, some of these people were stoned to death which might sound like a group of people throwing rocks at you until you die.
No.
Stoning is when the lay you down, presumably tied up somehow, and they place large rocks on you one at a time until you’re finally crushed to death.
 

C-2

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Cool stories guys, great thread SoCalDave.

Ancestry.com is awesome for finding, or piggy-backing onto research done by other family members you may not be aware of. Ancestry has pics of draft cards, city directories, Ellis Island registrations, high school yearbook photos, headstones from other states, all kinds of cool stuff. DO NOT GET IT CONFUSED WITH THE DNA SECTION of their company, the genealogy info they maintain is insane and you can spend mass amounts of time on there; well worth subscription fee. A while back, BC put a post up about Mohave County Sheriff looking for next of kin from a murder in the 80's at the river - and using Ancestry I found a living sister within a half hour. But, somebody else had already found her too, most likely using the same resources!

In fact where is BC, he has an awesome family tree to share?
 

SoCalDave

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Cool stories guys, great thread SoCalDave.

Ancestry.com is awesome for finding, or piggy-backing onto research done by other family members you may not be aware of. Ancestry has pics of draft cards, city directories, Ellis Island registrations, high school yearbook photos, headstones from other states, all kinds of cool stuff. DO NOT GET IT CONFUSED WITH THE DNA SECTION of their company, the genealogy info they maintain is insane and you can spend mass amounts of time on there; well worth subscription fee. A while back, BC put a post up about Mohave County Sheriff looking for next of kin from a murder in the 80's at the river - and using Ancestry I found a living sister within a half hour. But, somebody else had already found her too, most likely using the same resources!

In fact where is BC, he has an awesome family tree to share?
Thats exactly where she started it from. Took her almost two years to complete. The registry section startimg with my great grandparents in 1809 to 2002 was like 123 pages long. Every detail of each individual. Had to been a crazy amount of time she spent on that part alone. I’ll post up a link to it later.
 
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buck35

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My wife's dad was a wallace from Scotland. She was born in Canada as was he.

My dad had a bunch of ancestor's from there as well . My mother's side is a mystery as her mom passed when she was 2 and her dad went on the gold rush while in california and Alaska passing her off to my great aunt in the 20s. He was never heard from again..

My mom is 95 to put this in perspective. Her uncle? Was a partner with Sam Hill when the railroad came thru our town in the early 1900s.
 

BoatCop

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I did both mine and my wife's genealogy. Most of mine is kinda dead ended in the mid-late 1800s. My Dad is mostly Swede and Norse, with his grandfather coming over in 1860. Primary name there is Nelson and Anderson. And if you don't know about Scandinavian names, it was always done by (if it were me): given name - Alan, father's name - Nils (or Nels). So I would be known as Alan, Nels' son. Same as our host here, would be David, John's son. My great Grandfather, John Peter Anderson was a Fisherman from Sweden who settled in Marquette, MI and established one of the largest commercial fishing operations on Lake Superior, The Anderson Fish Company. My great grandfather is standing on the stern of the fishing boat in the bottom picture.

FI-147.jpg


m-miscfish-001.jpg


Being master mariners, my Swede and Norse ancestors gravitated toward maritime careers. John Peter's daughter, my great Aunt Lena Anderson, married another Scandinavian, John Arndt Anderson, but he from Norway, rather than Sweden. He was a master mechanic, builder, and mariner. He was Assistant Keeper at the Marquette Life Saving Service Station, and later was Keeper at other Lake Superior USLSS Stations. He and the Marquette Keeper, Henry Cleary, were the first to put an engine in a Surf Rescue Boat, and revolutionized maritime rescue. Their design and engineering was adopted for surf boats Nationwide. When the Coast Guard was established in 1915, he was commissioned a Captain and was the first Commanding Officer at a new Coast Guard Station in Mackinac, Mi. Here's a link to his story that I posted here several years ago. John Also built several homes and cottages in Marquette, that my family lived in, up until a few years ago.

 

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All I know is my great great grandfather on my dad side was hung for stealing a horse.
 

PlanB

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A relative on my fathers side spent five years traveling the US and Europe tracing our family tree. I have a relative that fought in the Battle of Lexington and Concord. She actually had documents that showed his pay that he received for his travel to and from the battle. She also found a relative that fell at the battle of Gettysburg fighting for the North. She had binders of some really interesting stuff, but after my father died I lost contact with her. I wish I had copies of her binders.
 

BoatCop

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My wife's dad was a wallace from Scotland. She was born in Canada as was he.

My dad had a bunch of ancestor's from there as well . My mother's side is a mystery as her mom passed when she was 2 and her dad went on the gold rush while in california and Alaska passing her off to my great aunt in the 20s. He was never heard from again..

My mom is 95 to put this in perspective. Her uncle? Was a partner with Sam Hill when the railroad came thru our town in the early 1900s.
My wife is Scottish, through one Ludovic Grant, of the Scottish Grant Clan, and is direct descended from the Stuarts/Stewards, including King James, I through V (albeit from a concubine). And through that line is also a direct descendant of Robert the Bruce. Ludovic was banished from Scotland in the 1700s, due to disloyalty to the Crown. He settled with the Cherokee and "married" a Cherokee maiden. That side of her family married with another Cherokee line, that of "Nanyehi" aka Nancy Ward, Beloved Woman of the Cherokees. Her great (x3) grandmother walked the Trail of Tears in 1835 at 7 years old. Kathy is related to such Cherokee notables as Sequoyah, Wil Rogers, and Sam Starr (Husband of outlaw Belle Starr, of the James and Younger gangs).

The other side of her family was an Original Settler family of the South. Her side was fairly easy to trace and research, as Cherokee ancestry and history is very well documented, as was the Settler (actually hillbilly) "Caudill" (her maiden name) lineage. (If you watch the movie Coal Miner's daughter with Sissy Spacek, in the scene where she tells Tommy Lee Jones that she's pregnant, in the background there's a General Store that says "Caudill Store" on the window.) Yep. One of her ancestors.
 

Hypnautic

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We always heard the rumor as kids, but...

My Dad was able to find a Great grandfather’s two families.

Yup, had one in England and then sailed over to Canada and started another.

Doing his research on the free trail period of Ancestry. He was contacted online from a lady in England saying that she has pictures of the man my Dad was researching. And it was her Grandfather! They were told he died in Canada as he was in the Military, but had rumors he was still alive.

Dad put all families in contact (with their permission) and even meet the family from England when they were on vacation in the US.
 

highvoltagehands

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I’ve done DNA tests with National Geographic Genographic2.0 and 23 & me, But I felt building the family tree on Ancestry.com was way more interesting. About every 6-12 months I’ll buy a full 1 month subscription to see if any new info has been added to net. I built or piggy backed my dad’s side of family tree back to 1700’s Spain and my moms side back to 1600’s Germany. Building and researching one’s Family Tree search is a both fascinating and sometimes frustrating rabbit hole. To be accurate you need to build it going backwards and proof it going forwards. Beware of piggybacking, it’s a great source of true and false info, and spellings in Census Reports. Here’s a few of my most interesting ancestors so far.

My Great Grandfather Samuel Hudelson 1874-1946 was Teacher, Archeologist & Building Supt for NM Palace of Governors. He taught Industrial Arts at Indian Schools. He helped dig out and rebuild historical NM ruin sites like Chaco Canyon and Gran Quivera. He helped build the NM POG and most of it’s furniture.
Supposedly he was buried on the NM POG grounds in 1946. (I think the burial site might be a family fib, but we’ve been unable to find a different burial site.)
https://www.yumpu.com/en/document/view/29133751/furnishing-the-santa-fe-style-el-palacio-magazine

My Great, Great, Great Grandfather Auguste LaCome was a Mountaineer, Trapper, Tracker and first Licensed Indian trader in New Mexico. He’d also been a Indian fighter & bounty hunter so Gov James Calhoun sent him to investigate the White Massacre. He petitioned the campaign against the Apache which Foreshadowed the Jicarilla War. I think the coolest thing was He and Kit Carson were pretty tight And he has a Wiki-page.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Auguste_Lacome

I have a Great Uncle by marriage who did time in Alcatraz. I haven’t been there yet to confirm or get a picture but his name “Donaldson” is carved into cell wall.
625148E0-80ED-4F16-A1A2-0C5B04EFEA17.jpeg
 
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DaveC

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We don’t talk about my paternal grandmother’s family much outside “the family”

They were working for some rather large well dressed Italian gentlemen in Cicero IL during prohibition.(outside of Chicago) The kind of guys that had no necks and wore pinky rings.

They produced a certain distilled adult beverage for these gentlemen.

Anyway all that was said about the incident was that one day they had an unfortunate explosion. They felt it was a good time to move on after the incident and get out of town. Good thing too before the “boss” found out what happened to his still.

they have not been back

Thats all we are allowed to say outside the family.

Capice!!!
 
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BoatCop

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One of the few parts on MY direct line that I was able to research before the late 1800s, was my maternal Grandfather's. Their last name "Royea" was French Canadian, and migrated to the Upper Peninsula of Michigan from Quebec. It's believed that the name was originally "Roy", that translated to "Royea" by census takers and government officials, due to the emphasis placed on the "y" in French speech.

Although I didn't have access to Canadian records, one area where I was able to trace was his Grandmother, My great great-Grandmother, a Margaret Helen Gauthier. She is daughter of a Joseph Gauthier, who's mother was an Ottowa-Menominee Native slave on a French Plantation. Joseph's father, was Claude Charles Gauthier deVierville, the nephew of the Plantation owner, at the ages of 13-16 "debauched" numerous slaves of the plantation. Joseph Gauthier was the product of that rape. The Ottawa woman Sho-Sha-Qua was of the "Caron" family, granddaughter to Claude Vieux "Old War" Carron who lived 1710-1782 in the Green Bay, WI area. He was head war-chief and the head speaker for the Menominee, in the French-Indian war vs. the Pontiac. I traced the Caron name, given to Claude "Old War" by his father's involvement* with a Native woman, back to the 1500s in France.

* marriage wasn't a term used for White-Native relationships back then. French Settlers, Traders and Military traveled frequently back to France, spending about 1/2 the year at home and half in the New World. They almost always had two families. The French one and the New World, Native one. Wives and families were not permitted to migrate to the New World, but single females, mostly prostitutes and other women of ill repute, were often shipped over like cattle to meet the needs of the Frenchmen.

It is surprisingly easy to trace French-Canadian family history from the upper mid-west to Quebec region. The Church at that time kept meticulous records, as the settlers and native alike, were baptized into the Church HQ'd at Michellimakcinac (Mackinac, MI), recording parental names, birth and death dates, etc. Often the natives were "baptized" into the Church following their deaths to "save their savage souls". The mixed settler and Native Offspring were called the Metis people.

If you watched the National Geographic Series "Barkskins", those are the stories of the people that I'm descended from. French settlers, soldiers, and Native traders in the French held regions of Canada and upper mid-west of what's now the United States.
 

Wolskis

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Fathers side came from Karnitz Germany, arrived in Baltimore 1870. Soon to Milwaukee for 3 years and the railroad was expanding north to Lake Superior so they settled in Butternut WI around 1873. Not much on my mom's side. The little girl in front of August was my grandpa's little sister who lived to 104, still living in the woods until she was 99. I saw here chase a black bear from her bird feeder with a broom. Very funny at the time.
Wegners 1913 0001.JPG
 

bocco

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We don’t talk about my paternal grandmother’s family much outside “the family”

They were working for some rather large well dressed Italian gentlemen in Cicero IL during prohibition.(outside of Chicago) The kind of guys that had no necks and wore pinky rings.

They produced a certain distilled adult beverage for these gentlemen.

Anyway all that was said about the incident was that one day they had an unfortunate explosion. They felt it was a good time to move on after the incident and get out of town. Good thing too before the “boss” found out what happened to his still.

they have not been back

Thats all we are allowed to say outside the family.

Capice!!!
Great story. My grandfather was a truck driver in Chicago in those days. He got offered a side job delivering said adult beverages for possibly the same guys. He declined the job do to having a family and concerns that he may not come home one night. He them moved to San Francisco for the better weather.

Yes, I capice.
 

Carlson-jet

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My Mother researched our family history and anyone connected to the family by marriage for about 13 years. I have 2, 4" tall filling cabinets and many gigs plus a bookshelf of albums. She created specific albums for each member of the family for them to keep. All the cousins and nieces etc.
When you start getting into the maternal and paternal sides of a big tree it gets very complicated.
I'm The last in line with my name. Have kids while you are young. Too many in my generation waited.

I will say I'm 4th Generation Arizonan on my Dads side starting from 1890's. My great great Grandfather Micheal Eugene Burtcher (https://www.geni.com/people/Michael-Burtcher/6000000002442041210 ) lived in Texas and a cattle rancher. Birthdate: January 17, 1815 Birthplace: Ste Genevieve, Ste Genevieve Co, MO. Death: January 18, 1864 (49) Blanco Co, TX

My Great Grandfather Virgil Eugene Burtcher continued the cattle ranching and owned land on both sides of the river in Lordsburg NM and AZ. My Great Grandmother from Illinois ( Troy Grove) [Matty May McLaughlin] was a hell of a pioneer. She drove a car from Il. to AZ in the 19th century. My Grand father was born in Duncan while AZ was still a territory in 1905. Papa was the 5th Operating engineer in AZ. His first drivers license was a coin. My Dad was born in Morenci. The hospital he was born in would be many hundreds of feet in the air now. The joke is he was born in a hole in the ground.
All came from Europe at one time.
I have more Family information then I know what to do with. The Pictures are overwhelming along with all the names.
Crazy stuff if one dives deep into it. It was My Moms passion until her death.
The really sad part is Nobody cares to hold onto this information and when I'm gone will most likely be discarded.
 

Danger Dave

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I didn't research anything but from watching CNN I have surmised that I am a direct descendant of slave owners who helped institute the systemic racism that is ruining this country.
 

BoatCop

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As I mentioned above, my wife's line in the USA goes back pre-revolution. The Caudill family arrived in the US in the early 1700s and her family fought in every war since the Revolution. Below is a picture of her Great-Great Grandfather, James Aaron Caudill (on right) and another Great-Great Grandfather, Alfred Holland. Alfred Holland married Margaret Adair, half-blooded Cherokee. Alfred and Margaret's daughter, Lou Holland married James Aaron Caudill's son, James Watson Caudill. Both James Aaron Caudill and Alfred Holland were in the Civil War, serving for the duration.

1a633d87-4517-4db4-9fb0-eca46a611b83.jpg


The below 1907 photo is of the Holland family, with Alfred Estes Holland far left and Margaret Elizabeth Adair, to his left. The elderly woman towards the middle is Susannah Deborah (Bean) Adair. She (Susannah) was the child who walked the trail of tears at age 7. Far right, seated, is Kathy's Great Grandmother, Lou Holland, with Kathy's grandfather, J Holland Caudill, seated between her and Susannah. The other children are various brothers, sisters, nieces, and nephews.

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Susannah Deborah Bean married James Warren Adair. James was also 1/2 Cherokee and walked the Trail of Tears at age 8. He also served in the Civil War and died in 1876 of complications from wounds received in the war. Below is a photo of the two of them. James is the son of Walter Scott "Red Watt" Adair and Nancy McCoy Harris. The Adairs were descended from the Irish Adair family. Nancy Harris was descended from Englishman John Harris and Lucinda "Lucy" Fields.

7ea9abb8-8b90-42bb-971b-c85dbcf244a2.jpg


I could go back several generations from this point, that is a mixture of Scottish (as described in a previous post), Cherokee, Military, Traders, and Southern settlers.
 

mjc

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My wife has some of her family working on this. But I just found this last week in my mother stuff. The original wedding invitation for my dad's parents.
20200917_194655.jpg
 

DaveC

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Probably a good move.

Funny. My relatives escaped..... errrr. I meant ..... moved to Tampa. Then moved to North Beach in San Francisco.

its among the Italians

Great story. My grandfather was a truck driver in Chicago in those days. He got offered a side job delivering said adult beverages for possibly the same guys. He declined the job do to having a family and concerns that he may not come home one night. He them moved to San Francisco for the better weather.

Yes, I capice.
 
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