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Holy shit. I-695 bridge in Baltimore collapse.

dread Pirate

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Some of the most beautiful women I've ever seen were in that place back in the 90's into mid 2000's, few that I hooked up with didn't discuss their employment.
I think at one point a lot of talent was coming from the Deja Vu chain.
Sometimes end my night at the Crazy Horse where the rules ;) were a little more lax. I wasn't really a strip club guy, once or twice a year deal.
Funny deal, only room I could get when I landed one night was the Super 8 on Spenard, next door was a club (Shithole), wandered over for a beer and it was fetish night, all of the strippers were pregnant. o_O

That's enough internet for the day thank you,,,,,,, :oops:
 

monkeyswrench

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So, the news stated that 23 people were on board the ship at the time.
20 Indian nationals, two harbor pilots...

So, was the captain an Eastern European? Seem really stupid to list 22 of the 23 aboard....
 

rrrr

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Man oh Man do I have stories, the strippers in Anchorage can spot a fisherman with cash in his pocket from a hundred miles. ;)
How many drunk fishermen and construction workers have discovered a bottle of champagne costs $200?

😁
 

poncho

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How many drunk fishermen and construction workers have discovered a bottle of champagne costs $200?

😁
I'd try to tell them but the smokeshow in their lap rubbing away shuts off all brain functions. My advise is always take cash you wont miss and no debit or credit cards, some listen some don't, live and learn.
 

Wolskis

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Hazardous Material Containers 'Breached' During Baltimore Bridge Collapse: NTSB

teaser image
Singapore-flagged cargo vessel Dali had 56 containers of hazardous materials on board at the time of the incident.

FRI MAR 29, AT 2:15 PM


😆

Bathroom reading

 

monkeyswrench

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Why does this matter?
I don't really know if it does matter where he was from...it sure appeared to be a power outage situation, and there were reports the captain called a mayday type situation and tugboats minutes before impact. That said, why try and hide the captain's nationality? What purpose does it really serve?
 

Taboma

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I don't really know if it does matter where he was from...it sure appeared to be a power outage situation, and there were reports the captain called a mayday type situation and tugboats minutes before impact. That said, why try and hide the captain's nationality? What purpose does it really serve?
According to Synergy Marine Group, the company who manages the Dali, all crew of 22, were from India.
Baltic Shipping, the company that's maritime hiring service, shows that 52 yo Ukrainian reported as the captain, was the ship's Master back in 2016 when the ship was owned by another company.

Information directly from the Ship's management company, can be found here.

 

500bbc

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How far would that vessel travel to drift to a stop if it lost all power at 8 knots?
 

monkeyswrench

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According to Synergy Marine Group, the company who manages the Dali, all crew of 22, were from India.
Baltic Shipping, the company that's maritime hiring service, shows that 52 yo Ukrainian reported as the captain, was the ship's Master back in 2016 when the ship was owned by another company.

Information directly from the Ship's management company, can be found here.

That makes sense. Some of the articles are leaving out one, which is odd, instead of saying they don't know. They also point out where the rest were from. It's like they are trying to bait.

The first news was flagged from Singapore, operated by a different company and contracted by Maersk. It could be in rush to be first reporting, the early info was found by looking up the ship's name...

Or, it was Russia...a "bridge for a bridge" 🤣
 

Nordie

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DirtyWhiteDog

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Help me out here. I've read that they dropped their port anchor when they first lost power to try and slow the ship. In the videos , the ship is turning to the right as it hits directly into the pylon
 

Pattle

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Help me out here. I've read that they dropped their port anchor when they first lost power to try and slow the ship. In the videos , the ship is turning to the right as it hits directly into the pylon

Are you asking why it wasn't turning to port, due to the anchor? Anchor by itself won't do much. It's the heavy chain that really does the work. Unfortunately, not enough distance for chain to pay out before hitting the bridge.
 

lbhsbz

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Help me out here. I've read that they dropped their port anchor when they first lost power to try and slow the ship. In the videos , the ship is turning to the right as it hits directly into the pylon
It ain't like in Pirates of the Carribean when they dropped anchor and it did something....If they did drop it underway (which I doubt they did) it would have simply snapped the cable off as soon as it caught something on the bottom. Anchors are not brakes, they are to hold the ship in place once it's already stopped.
 

DirtyWhiteDog

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Are you asking why it wasn't turning to port, due to the anchor? Anchor by itself won't do much. It's the heavy chain that really does the work. Unfortunately, not enough distance for chain to pay out before hitting the bridge.

Yes, that was my. Question. I understand that it would just create drag at best, but the ship does move to the right when it is a few hundred yards from the bridge. No conspiracies, just wondering
 

Wolskis

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Navy story:
We were anchored out of a port in South Korea back in 87 when during the night winds picked up enough to start dragging anchor towards land. The ship was in a Hot Iron status meaning 2 electrical generators online along with other auxiliary equipment.
Around 0200 things got fun, word came down from the captain to fire up at least 1 gas turbine, clutch into the reduction gear so the ship had propulsion. I slept thru this event but had qualified people in the right spot to complete the order within 10-15 minutes.
Getting the ship on main propulsion:
Verify main control room (CCS) had throttle controls
Someone in CCS qualified to start an engine
Someone in the engine room to monitor and verify status
Start or verify fuel pump running
Start or verify lube oil pumps running
Start or verify hydraulic pump running
Take shaft off turning gear
Verify fuel head tank level
Open bleed air from running generator or line up high pressure air to start gas turbine
Start gas turbine
Verify compressor speed at ~7000 rpm
Clutch in power turbine to reduction gear
Verify shaft rotation
Now at single engine operation
Transfer throttle to bridge.
 

Pattle

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Wow good memory. I was on a gas turbine ship from '92-96 and I wouldn't have remembered all those steps.
 

monkeyswrench

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Navy story:
We were anchored out of a port in South Korea back in 87 when during the night winds picked up enough to start dragging anchor towards land. The ship was in a Hot Iron status meaning 2 electrical generators online along with other auxiliary equipment.
Around 0200 things got fun, word came down from the captain to fire up at least 1 gas turbine, clutch into the reduction gear so the ship had propulsion. I slept thru this event but had qualified people in the right spot to complete the order within 10-15 minutes.
Getting the ship on main propulsion:
Verify main control room (CCS) had throttle controls
Someone in CCS qualified to start an engine
Someone in the engine room to monitor and verify status
Start or verify fuel pump running
Start or verify lube oil pumps running
Start or verify hydraulic pump running
Take shaft off turning gear
Verify fuel head tank level
Open bleed air from running generator or line up high pressure air to start gas turbine
Start gas turbine
Verify compressor speed at ~7000 rpm
Clutch in power turbine to reduction gear
Verify shaft rotation
Now at single engine operation
Transfer throttle to bridge.
There are no less than 5 ways I could screw that up. I have trouble remembering to fire the motor when trying to steer away from the edge or idiots floating down river.
 

Wolskis

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Typically while underway the engineering department had a 3 hour window after dinner to conduct drills for training of the new guys, qualify for the next position and to just keep sharp at the current position. A team would initiate a simulated casualty and the team would monitor how it was handled. I must have seen the 15 or so possible casualties several hundred times. The first 5-6 steps to control the situation must be memorized. That's the high level of it.
If the decision was made to simulate a major fuel or lube oil leak that went into a fire, General Quarters (GQ) went down, all hands main their battle stations. Now repair locker 5 was manned by the engineering department to simulate fighting the fire. Tracking the manning and steps taken to fight a fire is on a whole other level.
 

RitcheyRch

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BOMBSHELL REPORT: Synergy Marine Group managed the ship that hit the Baltimore bridge and has a STRONG BUSINESS RELATIONSHIP with China – It specializes in REMOTE SYSTEM monitoring.
"Synergy provides ship owners with mission-critical services including full technical management (e.g. regulatory compliance, maintenance, procurement, and remote systems monitoring), crew management (e.g. sourcing and training of seafarers and services like payroll) as well as marine services, (e.g. decarbonization services, seafarer health and wellness, new building design and supervision and project management including for the installation of energy-saving devices)."


434749269_7636054536404883_2959695768309581311_n.jpg
 

BabyRay

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BOMBSHELL REPORT: Synergy Marine Group managed the ship that hit the Baltimore bridge and has a STRONG BUSINESS RELATIONSHIP with China – It specializes in REMOTE SYSTEM monitoring.
"Synergy provides ship owners with mission-critical services including full technical management (e.g. regulatory compliance, maintenance, procurement, and remote systems monitoring), crew management (e.g. sourcing and training of seafarers and services like payroll) as well as marine services, (e.g. decarbonization services, seafarer health and wellness, new building design and supervision and project management including for the installation of energy-saving devices)."


434749269_7636054536404883_2959695768309581311_n.jpg
Source?
 

monkeyswrench

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I especially liked the part about how the ship "made a hard right turn".

Maybe it was actually a Stoker, disguised as a container ship?

🤔
All things are relative. After reading what C'ya said about how far a ship like that could coast due to mass, maneuverability doesn't seem like a strength those things have.
 

RichL

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All things are relative. After reading what C'ya said about how far a ship like that could coast due to mass, maneuverability doesn't seem like a strength those things have.
Having had the opportunity to spend a few hours of wheel time on something roughly 2/3 the size of this ship I can guarantee you maneuverability is not a strength. Just saying.
 

monkeyswrench

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lbhsbz

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Wonder if this is a new thing, or something that happens often? Can't remember what the verticals are like on the Vincent Thomas, but could you imagine someone taking out the Golden Gate? If not for anything else, just how iconic it is.
My Dad retired as the assistant chief harbor engineer for the Port of LA....I was discussing this with him. ]He said any bridge pilings that are in the water have islands built around them anymore to prevent this sort of thing. When the baltimore bridge was built, ships were relatively tiny and wouldn't have done this sort of damage....so back then they did it differently. I don't think anyone back then could imagine ships would get this big.

The St. Vincent Thomas bridge doesn't have any structure in the water...so it's a different animal. The main channel at POLA is only about 1000ft wide also....not anywhere near the Baltimore span.
 

monkeyswrench

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My Dad retired as the assistant chief harbor engineer for the Port of LA....I was discussing this with him. ]He said any bridge pilings that are in the water have islands built around them anymore to prevent this sort of thing. When the baltimore bridge was built, ships were relatively tiny and wouldn't have done this sort of damage....so back then they did it differently. I don't think anyone back then could imagine ships would get this big.

The St. Vincent Thomas bridge doesn't have any structure in the water...so it's a different animal. The main channel at POLA is only about 1000ft wide also....not anywhere near the Baltimore span.
That was a neat job your dad had. I went over those bridges a bunch, but never really payed attention to them, such as where the verticals landed. It is crazy to think of the mass being propelled through the water now.
 
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